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Displaying items by tag: Harland & Wolf

Harland & Wolff, the iconic shipyard with over 160 years of maritime and offshore engineering pedigree, is delighted to announce it has signed a framework agreement with the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) for the haul-out, repairs, maintenance, refurbishment and associated works for the RNLI's fleet of lifeboats.

Under the terms of this framework agreement, Harland & Wolff (Appledore) will be responsible for the repairs, maintenance and other works programmes defined by RNLI for its fleet of lifeboats and other vessels. This agreement will span multiple years and each docking will be priced as a bespoke agreement based on the scope of works required to be performed on each vessel.

As part of this agreement, Harland & Wolff will also support the RNLI with free bi-annual haulouts and wash down of its Appledore lifeboat.

The RNLI currently has a fleet of 431 lifeboats and 238 lifeboat stations that will require repairs and maintenance on a regular basis in order to keep them active and ready for deployment. Its Appledore yard will be working in conjunction with RNLI's internal team to perform defined works programmes.

John Wood, Group CEO of Harland & Wolff, commented: "I am delighted that Appledore has signed this framework agreement with the RNLI. The RNLI is a much-respected institution, and we are privileged to be hosting its vessels at Appledore. Our capacity, capability and proximity to the RNLI's main centres of activity has been crucial to the award of this contract. This, once again, demonstrates that our strategy to be geographically diverse in order to attract local business is sound and bearing fruit. I look forward to a long-standing and growing relationship with the RNLI in the months and years ahead and will be looking at opportunities to support them, not only from Appledore, but also from all our sites across the UK."

Harland & Wolff is a multisite fabrication company, operating in the maritime and offshore industry through five markets: commercial, cruise and ferry, defence, energy and renewables and six services: technical services, fabrication and construction, decommissioning, repair and maintenance, in-service support and conversion.

Its Belfast yard is one of Europe’s largest heavy engineering facilities, with deep water access, two of Europe’s largest drydocks, ample quayside and vast fabrication halls. As a result of the acquisition of Harland & Wolff (Appledore) in August 2020, the company has been able to capitalise on opportunities at both ends of the ship-repair and shipbuilding markets where there will be significant demand.

In February 2021, the company acquired the assets of two Scottish-based yards along the east and west coasts. Now known as Harland & Wolff (Methil) and Harland & Wolff (Arnish), these facilities will focus on fabrication work within the renewable, energy and defence sectors.

Harland & Wolff is a wholly owned subsidiary of Harland & Wolff Group Holdings plc (previously known as InfraStrata plc), a London Stock Exchange-listed firm. In addition, it also owns the Islandmagee gas storage project, which is expected to provide 25% of the UK’s natural gas storage capacity and to benefit the Northern Irish economy as a whole when completed.

Published in Shipyards
Tagged under

Shipyard owners of Harland & Wolff, InfraStrata has reported "steady progress" in the first months of its financial year.

In a Q1 trading update, the business said it has booked about £6.5m in the eight months to 31 March 2021, with further growth expected this year.

Its cruise and ferry market has broken even after larger contract wins were established.

InfraStrata acquired the assets of the Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast from administrators in 2019.

It then further invested in the business by acquiring the Appledore shipyard in North Devon.

Insider has more here on this story. 

Afloat adds that InfraStrata in recent weeks acquired the assets of Scottish based Burntisland Fabrication Ltd from the administrators. 

These facilities will trade under Harland & Wolff brand and represent the final fabrication piece of its UK footprint.

This will position the company to fully deliver on its existing strategy quicker than it would have done with only its two existing sites: Harland & Wolff (Belfast) and Harland & Wolff (Appledore).

Published in Shipyards

Shipyard Harland and Wolff in Belfast Harbour has secured a £2m (€2.35m) asset backed term debt facility.

Funds raised writes Independent.ie, will be used for working capital purposes, according to a statement from InfraStrata, the company which agreed to buy the Belfast shipyard last year.

The facility is for a period of two years, with the main amount repayable as a lump sum payment at the end of the period.

The loan carries a coupon of 13.2pc per year, payable in equal monthly instalments.

As previously reported on Afloat last week InfraStrata is behind a gas storage project in Larne Lough. 

For more click here on this financial development at the yard.

Published in Belfast Lough

Shipyard Harland and Wolff has won its first contract since it was taken over by the London-listed group InfraStrata.

The new parent company of the historic Belfast shipyard said that Harland and Wolff had secured a contract for the “dockings of two vessels for their owners to carry out their annual inspections and maintenance”.

No details of the organisation that owns the vessels or the value of the contract was disclosed.

But InfraStrata said it means the yard will be utilised from December 20th until the work is complete in January.

For more The Irish Times has a report

Published in Belfast Lough

Harland & Wolff's new owner is to take possession of the historic Belfast shipyard today as it pays £3.3m to the administrators of the business.

According to the Belfast Telegraph, Infrastrata plc plans to use the shipyard which built the Titanic for fabrication work in its underground natural gas storage project in Islandmagee near Larne.

Infrastrata chief executive John Wood has said that buying Harland & Wolff would save it £45m of a proposed spend of £303m on the Islandmagee project.

But it is also hoping to secure other shipbuilding projects in the future. At its peak, Harland & Wolff employed 35,000 people, and built 140 ships during the Second World War.

Infrastrata has already paid a deposit of £500,000 to business advisory firm BDO, which was appointed administrators to the yard in August.

Click here to read more on paying additional costs of the marine engineering facility.  

Published in Belfast Lough

London-listed company, Infrastrata that is taking over Harland & Wolff, could bring major shipbuilding projects back to Belfast after confirming plans to work with Navantia, the Spanish state-owned shipbuilding company.

According to The Irish Times, Infrastrata has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Navantia which it intends to follow up with a more formal teaming agreement. That could result in both organisations working together on a number of infrastructure and marine projects.

Navantia is among companies tendering for a £1.5 billion fleet contract with the UK defence ministry.

Earlier this month, Infrastrata raised £6 million (€7 million) via a share issue to complete its acquisition of the historic east Belfast shipyard that built the Titanic. The company still needs final approval from its shareholders to acquire the assets of Harland & Wolff, which it will seek at a meeting on November 29th.

More reading on the story here. 

Published in Belfast Lough

An energy firm, BBC reports, that agreed to buy the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast has raised the money it needs to complete the deal.

InfraStrata raised £6m through a share issue on Monday.

The east Belfast shipyard, best known for building the Titanic, was agreed for sale to the London-based firm last month.

It went into administration in August, putting 120 jobs at risk, after its Norwegian parent company collapsed.

InfraStrata shareholders need to approve the deal at a meeting on 29 November.

More here on this story. 

Published in Belfast Lough

The Belfast shipyard that built the Titanic, Harland and Wolff is according to the Sunday Times, set to be rescued tomorrow in a £6m deal.

AIM-listed company, InfraStrata has agreed to buy the historic shipyard out of administration, will tap investors for the money tomorrow via a share placing. It is understood to have signed a conditional contract to buy Harland and Wolff from administrator BDO.

InfraStrata will use the shipyard to supply a £265m gas storage facility it is building north of the city, preserving the jobs of the 79 remaining workers.

Harland and Wolff, which employed 30,000 people in Belfast’s industrial heyday, fell into administration in August after its Norwegian parent company, Dolphin Drilling, failed to find a buyer.

For more to read, click here. 

Published in Belfast Lough

According to the News Letter, hopes that the troubled shipyard of Harland & Wolff can be rescued were rising (yesterday) after a weekend of intensive negotiations.

The iconic company based in Belfast Lough entered administration last month after its Norwegian parent company, Dolphin Drilling, failed to find a buyer.

Spurred on by support from the public, the remaining workers staged a round-the-clock occupation of the site as part of a high-profile campaign to save the yard.

They have also maintained pressure on the government in the hope that the business could be nationalised.

Click here for more on the story. 

Published in Belfast Lough
Tagged under

Workers at Harland & Wolff have seen a deluge of support - from donations of suncream and food to performances by local celebrities.

As the Belfast Telegraph reports, the workforce continue their occupation of the historic shipyard even as the firm is placed into administration, there has been a steady stream of supporters arriving with donations and words of encouragement.

Newry singer Tommy Sands donned a Harland & Wolff cap as he performed a number of songs at the gates of the shipyard yesterday, including one he had written for the workers.

Unite shop steward and Harland & Wolff steel worker Joe Passmore thanked Mr Sands, saying his performance had made the hairs on the back of his neck stand up.

"Fantastic, I'm sure every shipyard worker here had the same feeling, I know you did actually," he said.

More can be read here on the story of the shipyard which as previously reported drew calls for it to be nationalised. 

Published in Belfast Lough
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The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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