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Displaying items by tag: Laser Radial

Laser Radial racing commenced on the third day of competition at Hempel World Cup Series Genoa and Line Flem Høst (NOR) and Switzerland’s Maud Jayet took the first race wins of the series to share an early lead. It wasn't a particularly auspicious start for either of the Irish Radial sailors Aisling Keller (yellow fleet) and Aoife Hopkins (blue) who finished 22nd and 34th respectively. Full results are here.

Of Ireland’s 13 Irish Sailing athletes attending the third event in the World Cup of Sailing series, only the two of the three Men’s 49er skiff crews had a race, while the Women’s Laser Radial event finally got underway but only completed one race.

Laser Radial 17042019The Laser Radial fleet (blue)

Aisling Keller from Tipperary had a 22nd place, while Howth’s Aoife Hopkins faltered at the start in the near flat calm conditions and placed last in the race. Her form recovered to the top 10 in the subsequent race but this was abandoned when the breeze died completely.

Both Women’s Laser Radial single-handers are sailing their first competitive event in six months following their winter training.

In the 49er skiffs, Howth’s Robert Dickson with Sean Waddilove, from Skerries, were penalised for premature starting in their only race of the day. Sean and Tadgh Donnelly, from Dun Laoghaire, had a 28th in the same race, while Ballyholme’s Ryan Seaton and Seafra Guilfoyle, from Cork, had no racing in their flight due to the conditions.

More light winds are expected for Thursday, meaning that the reserve days and weekend will be used to catch-up and deliver on the qualification rounds before Gold and Silver fleet finals.

Radial Fleet Calibre

The 67-boat fleet is split into blue and yellow for the qualification series and the Norwegian triumphed over Greek favourite Vasileia Karachaliou in the blue fleet with Jayet defeating Rio 2016 bronze medallist Anne-Marie Rindom in the yellow.

Only the Laser Radial and the 49er yellow fleet managed to complete a race on Wednesday as a consistent breeze failed to develop. A 3-4 knot southeasterly breeze was just enough for the Laser Radial and 49er to sail. The 470s and Finn will have to wait another day to get their competition underway. Meanwhile, the Nacra 17 remain on three qualification races, the 49erFX on five and the Laser on two.

The calibre of competitors in the Laser Radial is extremely high with numerous Olympic, World Championship and World Cup medallists.

Mistakes can be punished quickly but racing in the yellow fleet, Jayet was near faultless, leading at every mark. “I started quickly,” commented Jayet, “I got out of the pack to sail at the front of the race and managed to beat Anne-Marie.”

Long waits on the water for a sailable breeze to develop can make the mind wander and when racing does start, concentration levels have to rise as the Swiss racer explained, “It is hard to keep focused when everything is going slowly. You have to learn to be patient. As soon as you lose focus you would lose your speed. In days like this, whoever is the most patient will be in front.

“From the start, I try to relax. Instead of running after the gusts, I just wait until I get one. It was one of those days where you could see girls on the other side of the course had more wind but by the time you would get there, it would go. You have to wait your turn and eventually it will come.”

The secret to mastering the conditions and maintain focus is simple, as Jayet continued, “You have to force yourself to sail and train in these conditions. Whenever people see light winds they might not train. You have to train in really light sessions and learn how to stay calm. It’s important to get used to it. None of us can choose what we sail in so we have to try and be good in strong and light winds.”

And as a Swiss sailor from Lausanne, sailing out of Societe Nautique de Geneve, has training and sailing on famous Lake Geneva helped? “I don’t sail on the lake much anymore,” she laughed, “but on days like this, I wish I did more often.”

Jayet took the race win ahead of Rindom with Canadian Olympian Isabella Bertold and Daphne van der Vaart (NED) following.

In the blue fleet, Flem Høst was equally impressive, leading from start, “I managed to separate well from the fleet so I could get some private wind,” explained the Norwegian. “Then it was about staying on top of everyone which I managed to do.”

On keeping focus, the Norwegian had a similar mindset to Jayet, commenting, “It is hard to keep focused. You see everyone coming from behind so it’s important to focus on doing the basics right and keeping calm. I just focused on myself and tried to forget about everyone else.

“You can train the technique in lighter winds, speed, tacks and gybes so you have the right technique but then it’s about breathing right and keeping your cool.”

Greece’s Karachaliou followed Flem Høst into the finish with the experienced Tatiana Drozdovskaya (BLR) and Carolina Albano (ITA) coming through in third and fourth respectively.

Just one 49er race was completed and Croatian World Champions Sime and Mihovil Fantela clinched it, securing their second race victory from three completed so far. Their remaining race result is a disqualification that they picked up in the opening race.

The blue race was the third of the series and does not yet count on the overall leaderboard as the yellow were unable to complete a race on the water. Once their third race is completed the scores will be combined.

Racing is scheduled to continue at 11:00 local time on Thursday 17 April with additional races planned for all fleets in a bid to catch up on those lost.

Published in Tokyo 2020

Two of Ireland’s most promising sailors in Aoife Hopkins and Katie Tingle have been the subject of separate profiles in recent days.

Katie Tingle has been making her big comeback after a broken arm put her and Annalise Murphy’s 49erFX training regimen on pause last autumn.

But it’s also been part of a longer return for the Cork sailor, who swapped competitive racing for coaching after success in the Optimist class as a junior last decade.

A reconnection with former junior peer Annalise on the Wednesday night scene in Dublin led to a fateful phone call a year ago, from the Olympic silver medallist to the primary school teacher: did Katie want to join her 49erFX Olympic campaign?

“I don’t think she’d have asked me if she didn’t think I could do it and I wouldn’t have said yes if I didn’t think deep down that I could do it either,” Katie tells The42.ie.

The 29-year-old was already deep into training and conditioning when Annalise returned from her stint in the Volvo Ocean Race, and the two started getting to grips with their new boat on Dublin Bay — the Olympian learning from Katie who had previous experience in two-handed dinghies.

However, a freak incident just weeks into training left Katie with a broken arm — and out of the water for four crucial months.

As needs must, Annalise shortly after resumed training over the winter in the warmer climes of Portugal, with Adam Hyland in Katie’s stead — while Katie hit the gym as soon as doctors allowed get back on the road to sailing fitness.

Earlier this year Annalise and Katie, how fully healed up, reunited and got back in their groove with the challenging 49erFX as their first big test — and first Tokyo 2020 qualifier — looms in Genoa just two weeks from now.

“AoifeAoife Hopkins weight training | Photo: Irish Sailing

Another young sailor who faces a big test in Genoa is Howth Yacht Club’s Aoife Hopkins.

The Laser Radial ace not only steps into the significant gap left by Annalise Murphy, whose Rio 2016 silver medal was in the class — she’s also in competition with teammate Aisling Keller for the single slot available to Ireland.

Aoife tells The Irish Times how she juggles the training regimen of her Tokyo 2020 campaign with the demands of her maths degree at Trinity College, not to mention the various expenses associated with performance sailing at the highest level.

In a boost to their aspirations, Aoife and her fellow performance sailors now benefit from Irish Sailing's new Performance Headquarters in Dun Laoghaire, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Published in Olympic

As the days tick down to Christmas 2018, CH Marine Chandlery still has some special deals on Laser dinghies — but act fast as these offers are only available till Monday 24 December.

For just €6,950 (£6,185.50) including VAT you could have a standard Laser, Radial or 4.7 with XD rig and composite upper.

And that’s not all, as the price includes a trolley, top cover and foil bag, with sails fully numbered.

These popular packages have been selling fast and as of this morning (Thursday 20 December) there is only one Laser 4.7 deal remaining. If it’s what you’ve been looking for, don’t be disappointed this Christmas!

Be sure also to check out CH Marine’s daily deals on Facebook in the run-up to Santa’s arrival. Today you could save €70 on a Crewsaver Ergolift Offshore Lifejacket Auto 190N with light and hood.

Shop online at CHMarine.com or in store in Skibbereen, Cork and Newtownards — open from 9am to 2pm on Christmas Eve for any last-minute stocking-stuffers!

Published in CH Marine Chandlery

More than 40 Lasers have been registered thus far for the DMYC Frostbites, with entries still open online ahead of the series kickoff this Sunday 4 November.

The tally of 46 pledged for the latest Dublin Bay winter series is already way up on last year’s total — and even more interesting is that 24 of them are Laser Radials, showing a boost of interest among women, older and youth sailors.

In particular, the Dun Laoghaire Combined Clubs’ youth training programme is sending as many as eight Radials to this year’s Frostbites, along with a group of 4.7s.

It’s being hailed as a positive sign for the class which has long experienced difficulty in persuading parents and coaches to encourage their children to compete in local racing rather than training.

The impact of the recent Laser Master Worlds in Dun Laoghaire will also be felt with a strong contingent of older sailors in the Radial class this year.

With the final numbers looking to be a field that’s one-third Laser Radials, it could be marking the resurgence of the class often thought of as only a youth boat as one for all ages.

Published in DMYC

#Laser - Fionn Conway, Chris Bateman and Atlee Kohl top the tables of their respective fleets in the final Laser class national rankings for 2018.

In the standard rig, the National Yacht Club’s Conway stormed ahead of names very familiar to Afloat.ie readers, from Liam Glynn (3rd) to Ewan McMahon (11th) and Johnny Durcan (14th), to list but a few.

In the Laser Radial, Royal Cork sailor Chris Bateman’s strong results at this year’s regionals put him clear of a strong youth fleet — Jamie McMahon (5th), Aisling Keller (7th), Michael Carroll and Michael O’Suilleabhain (2nd and 9th) included.

And in the Laser 4.7, Bateman’s 29er partner Atlee Kohl ends the year eight points ahead of class newcomer Alana Coakley.

Published in Laser

#Laser - A 12-strong team is representing Ireland at the Laser Radial Youth Worlds in Kiel, Germany which kicked off over the weekend.

Best of the bunch thus far is Nell Staunton of the National Yacht Club, fresh off her eight-place finish in last month’s Youth Sailing Worlds in the US, who stands in 18th place in the girl’s division on 23 points after two races.

Clare Gorman, also of the NYC and the only other Irish girl in Kiel, is in 67th after a black flag in her first race.

Leading the Irish contingent in the boys’ division is Hugo Kennedy (Royal St George), who holds 32nd place on the leaderboard on 22 points after two races.

Geoff Power (Waterford Harbour; 47th) and Tom Higgins (RStGYC; 49th) are the closest Irish boys, with Toby Hudson-Fowler (RStGYC) in 81st despite an impressive eight-point score in his second race; Dan McGaughey (Donaghadee SC) 132nd; Peter Fagan (Skerries SC) 138th; Henry Higgins (RStGYC) 148th; Jack Fahy (Lough Derg YC) 178th and Paddy Cunnane (Dingle SC) trailing at 207th with a disqualification in his first race.

Those struggling down the table have four more qualifiers to go before the big fleet races later this week.

Published in Laser

The National Yacht Club's Nell Staunton continues to race in the top ten of the Laser Radial Girls class of the 2018 Youth Sailing World Championships at Corpus Christi Yacht Club in Texas. The Dublin school girl had another solid performance yesterday, scoring eight and 11 in the two races sailed. 

46 are competing in the girls class.

Overall, after four races Staunton drops one place from her eighth position after day one

In the boys Laser Radial class, Jack Fahy of Lough Derg and the Royal St. George Yacht Club drops back slightly from 19th to 22 from 58.

Results are here.

Ireland is competing in two single-handed classes at the Youth Worlds in Texas, there is no Irish representation in any of the double-handed classes.

In winning all three races by comfortable margins, Argentina's Nacra 15 crew of Teresa Romairone and Dante Cittadini have forged a comfortable lead in the open multihull class at the 48th Youth Sailing World Championships.

Romairone and Cittadini have posted the low score of eight points, good for a 13-point lead over Germany's Silas Mühle and Romy Mackenbrock. The German duo is tied with Belgium's crew of Henri Demesmaeker and Frederique van Eupen but hold the tiebreak advantage with two first-place finishes to the Belgians' one.

The day, however, belonged to the Argentinians.

"I think we managed to have good speed and to be consistent," said Romairone. "We didn't have great starts but we were fast and played the gusts well."

Romairone sailed the Youth Worlds last year in the 29er Class and placed 18th. She switched to the Nacra 15 at the behest of Argentina's sailing federation in preparation for the Youth Olympic Games, which will be held in Buenos Aires in October.

"This is very exciting," said Romairone. "There are so many different people, it's very fun and good preparation for the Youth Olympics."

After two days of racing with anywhere from four to six races completed, the top three in many classes have started to separate from the pack after being tightly bunched yesterday. It's a testament to the good sailors figuring out the racecourse and how to keep their boat moving in the choppy waters and gusty winds.

Romairone and Cittadini weren't the only ones to put forth great efforts today. Norway's Mathias Berthet and Alexander Franks-Plenty moved into the lead in the Boys' 29er Class by posting a 2-1-1. They now have the low score of 11 points and lead Seb Lardies and Scott Mckenzie of New Zealand by five points with Australians Henry Larkings and Miles Davey another two points behind.

Berthet and Franks-Plenty also represented Norway at last year's Youth Worlds in the 29er, where they won the silver medal. They got off to a slow start this year with a 6-8 in the first two races, but in the four races since then have found a faster gear.

"Yesterday we weren't very satisfied with our speed. We weren't used to the choppy conditions," said Berthet, the 17-year-old skipper. "Today we had good starts and a really good feeling on the upwind legs. It was a very good day for us."

"We're really happy about today," said Franks-Plenty. "We were sailing it low and fast, Aussie style. It paid off to go right and we started banging the right on every upwind leg. I'm not sure if it was the wind or waves or current, but the right was good. Maybe the wind was a bit stronger."

In the Girls' 420 Class the reigning gold medalists, Carmen and Emma Cowles of the U.S. stubbed their toes in one race then bounced back to win the second by a large margin. Since they've completed more than three races they're permitted to discard their worst finish. That means that the Cowles are counting three first-place finishes and lead the class by 4 points over Vita Heathcote and Emilia Boyle of Great Britain. Spain's Julia Minana Delhom and Silvia Sebastia Borso di Carminati are third with 8 points.

"We just jumped the line a bit in the first race," said Carmen Cowles, the skipper. "If we keep cool and collected in the boat, it'll be fine. The event's still up for grabs, so we'll have to stay conservative on the start line. We can give up a half length to not worry about being over."

The Cowles twins won the class last year by 26 points, counting all firsts and seconds and discarding a disqualification. And although they now have recorded a discard, Emma Cowles, the crew, complemented her sister for keeping the boat moving fast.

"After the start we're focusing on keeping the bow down and going for the pressure," said Emma Cowles. "Carmen's doing well with the controls in the boat and making sure we have max power."

Elsewhere in the fleet, Geronimo Nores of the U.S. continued to lead the way in the Boys' RS:X Class. The tall, 6-foot, 6-inch sailor added a 1-2 to yesterday's three first-place finishes, while discarding a fourth, and has six points in five counted races. He leads Italy's Nicolo Renna by four points and France's Fabien Pianazza by seven points.

In the Girls' RS:X Class last year's bronze medalist, Girogia Speciale of Italy, has taken the lead after winning all three races today. Speciale leads New Zealander Veerle ten Have by one point and Islay Watson of Great Britain by two points. The top three have separated from the pack as fourth-placed Weronika Marciniak of Poland is 15 points behind Watson.

Published in Youth Sailing

After two races sailed at the 2018 Youth Sailing World Championships at Corpus Christi Yacht Club in Texas, Ireland's Nell Staunton of the National Yacht Club lies in eighth position from 46 overall in the Laser Radial girls Class. 

In the boys Laser Radial class, Jack Fahy of Lough Derg and the Royal St. George Yacht Club is 19th from 58. 

Results are here.

More than 30 years have passed since the Youth Sailing World Championships have been held in the U.S.A, but if the week continues as it started for Team USA this regatta will long be remembered by the 14 American teenage sailors.

Following on from last evening's splendid Opening Ceremony hosted by 11th Hour Racing and The Harte Institute, a blustery southeasterly breeze allowed for the full complement of 23 races scheduled among the nine classes.

Team USA leads three classes-the Boys' RS:X and 420 and Girls' 420-and is placed second in another-the Girls' Laser Radial.

No one on the US team shone brighter today than Geronimo Nores, the 18-year-old representative in the Boys' RS:X Class. Nores won all three races and leads with the low score of 2 points. (Each crew in every class gets to discard its worst finish after three completed races.)

"I'm pretty surprised, it's very exciting," said Nores, whose first name is from his Argentinian mother and not a reference to the legendary American Indian. "It was a combination of good wind, being well rested and energized, and sailing well."

Energy has been lacking for Nores in the past year. It was one year ago when he was diagnosed with diabetes while racing in France. It turned out to be such a severe case that he has a canine working dog, a 20-month-old yellow Labrador named Luna, by his side at all times to alert him if his blood sugar levels drop to dangerously low levels. Luna even goes on the coach boat to monitor Nores in between races.

"I spent a week in the hospital in France," said Nores. "This year has been about recovering and getting back to sailing. I've had a difficult time competing, being on the water. It's amazing to see the progress I've made pay off on a day like today."

Although Nores put forth a commanding performance, the Boys' RS:X Class is tightly bunched. Second-placed Nicolo Renna of Italy has four points, third-placed Aleksander Przychodzen of Poland has seven points, fourth-placed Fabien Pianazza of France has eight points, while Leonidas Tsortanidis of Greece and Jim van Someren of the Netherlands each have nine points.

Every class is tightly packed after the first day, a result of just one day of racing but also of well-prepared sailors. In the Boys' 420 Class, JC Hermus and Walter Henry of the U.S.A. lead by five points, but second through 10th are separated by just seven points.

"It felt good today," said Hermus, the skipper who is on leave from the U.S. Naval Academy. "It was pretty fluky, there were some big shifts and some puffs came out of nowhere, so I'm happy for the consistent scores. We were just trying to stay out of the fray and survive the first day."

In the Boys' Laser Radial Class, Argentina's Juan Cardozo and Norway's Uffe Tomasgaard each have eight points, but Cardozo holds the tiebreaker by winning the second race. Australia's Zac Littlewood and New Zealand's Josh Armit are also tied with nine points, but Littlewood holds third place over his trans-Tasman Sea rival by winning the first race.

In the Girls' 29er Class, Norway's Pia Andersen and Nora Edland have three points, followed by Russia's Zoya Novikova and Diana Sabirova with four points, Germany's Maru Scheel and Freya Feilcke with six points, Italy's Michelle Waink and Claudia Gambarin with six points, and the USA's Berta Puig and Bella Casaretto with seven points.

The Girls' RS:X Class sees New Zealander Veerle ten Have in the lead with two points, followed by Islay Watson of Great Britain with three points and Italy's Giorgia Speciale with five points.

The Girls' Laser Radial Class is led by Emma Savelon with three points, followed by Charlotte Rose of the U.S.A and Poland's Wiktoria Golebiowska, tied on five points. Rose, the gold medalist in the class last year, won the second race to hold the tiebreaker over Golebiowska.

Another returning gold medal crew, Carmen and Emma Cowles in the Girls' 420 Class, picked up where they left off last year. The sisters won both races and lead the class with two points. Great Britain's Vita Heathcote and Emilia Boyle, Spain's Julia Minana Delhom and Silvia Sebastia Borso di Carminati and Switzerland's Solene Mariani and Maude Schmid all have six points apiece for second, third and fourth place, respectively.

In the Nacra 15 Class, Germany's Silas Muhle and Romy Mackenbrock lead with two points from their three completed races. Belgium's Henri Demesmaeker and Frederique van Eupen have three points, Argentina's Teresa Romairone and Dante Cittadini have five points, Laila Van der Meer have and Bjarne Bouwer of the Netherlands have eight points and Arnaud Grange and Marie van der Klink have nine points.

The Boys' 29er Class was the last one off the water this evening and Australians Henry Larkings and Miles Davey lead with the low score of three points in another tightly packed class. New Zealanders Seb Lardies and Scott Mckenzie hold second with four points, Italy's Federico Zampiccoli and Luca Fracassi are third with six points.

Racing is scheduled to resume today with another 23 races planned among the nine classes.

Published in Youth Sailing

#Laser - Irish Laser Radial Olympian Ciara Peelo will be head coach for the Irish Laser Class Association’s upcoming training weekend on 24-25 March.

The Beijing 2008 flag-bearer will offer her guidance especially to lighter and female Laser sailors over the weekend, which is hopeful for a big turnout spurred on by the ‘Annalise Effect’.

Find out more about how to take part on the Irish Laser class website HERE.

Published in Laser

#LaserRadial - National Yacht Club sailor Loghlen Rickard was a close second in the Laser Radial at this past weekend’s Leinsters in Rush.

It’s the latest strong result for the youth sailor who recently took his talents some 7,000km west for the Laser North American Championships in Vancouver, Canada.

Racing was held over for days of varied light to medium winds at the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club on English Bay from 21 June. 

Loghlen started strong with a bullet in race one, and had eight top-five finishes in the 12-race event.

The NYC sailor and Fort Lauderdale’s Sophia Reineke came off the water after 12 races tied on points in first and second respectively.

But a controversial protest saw them both disqualified from the last race, resulting in Vancouver’s own two-time Olympian Luke Ramsay taking the top step of the podium and Loghlen slipping to sixth after discards.

Nevertheless, it was a remarkable showing from the Dun Laoghaire stalwart, who also recently competed at the Radial Youth Euros in Poland.

Published in Laser
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