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Displaying items by tag: Lifeboats

A man found clinging to his capsized boat off Dalkey yesterday afternoon (Monday 15 July) was rescued by Dun Laoghaire’s RNLI lifeboat.

The volunteer lifeboat crew were requested by the Irish Coast Guard to launch their inshore lifeboat at 3.52pm following a report that a boat had capsized and a man was in the sea off Dalkey.

Several members of the public had reported seeing the man in difficulty and raised the alarm.

The lifeboat launched immediately and on arrival at the scene observed that a local fisherman was assisting the casualty by keeping him afloat from his 5.5m boat with the aid of a boat hook.

The crew proceeded to take the man out of the water and assess his condition before administering casualty care.

The coastguard helicopter Rescue 116 from Dublin was also tasked and met the lifeboat crew at Coliemore Harbour in Dalkey, where the man was given more casualty care.

A local doctor was also present at the scene and assisted the casualty until the ambulance arrived minutes later. He was subsequently transferred to St Vincent’s Hospital for further treatment.

Commenting after the callout, Dun Laoghaire RNLI helm Gary Hayes said: “This was a tremendous effort from all involved. We would like to extend our praise to the members of the public who alerted the emergency services as quickly as they did.

“We also want to thank the local fisherman for his help in this rescue and for his efforts to saving a life.”

Locals and visitors will have a change to celebrate the lifesaving work of Dun Laoghaire’s RNLI volunteers at the lifeboat station’s open day from 1pm this Sunday 21 July.

The station at Carlisle Pier will host tours of the all-weather lifeboat Anna Livia, while the inshore lifeboat Realt Na Mara will be on display at the old boathouse beside Rogan’s Slipway on the East Pier.

Souvenirs in support of the charitable work of the RNLI will be on sale in the station shop throughout the afternoon.

And special guests will be visiting the RNLI station during the afternoon, including Stormy Sam and the Dalkey Ukulele Klub.

Stephen Wynne, Dun Laoghaire RNLI lifeboat operations manager, said: “We are delighted to welcome everyone to inspect the lifeboats and meet the volunteer crew members and get an insight to what they do!”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Skerries RNLI helped rescue a woman and two children yesterday afternoon (Wednesday 10 July) after they were stranded on Shenick Island having been cut off by the rising tide.

Shortly after 3pm, the Irish Coast Guard tasked the north Co Dublin lifeboat station to investigate reports of a person waving for help on Shenick Island off Skerries.

The volunteer crew launched their Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat Louis Simson and rounded the headland at Red Island before proceeding to Shenick, where they found that lifeguards from the South Beach had reached the island in their dinghy and were checking on the woman and children’s wellbeing.

The three had walked to the island and had been cut off by the rising tide. They mentioned that they were beginning to feel cold so the crew transferred them to the lifeboat and returned to the station to warm up before a volunteer crew member drove them home.

Speaking about the callout, volunteer press officer Gerry Canning said: “It can be tempting to walk out to Shenick Island when the tide is low enough. However, the window for the tide is quite short and the island is bigger than it looks.

“We’d remind anyone walking along the coast to check the tide times and be aware of the risk of getting cut off. Always tell someone where you are going and ensure you have a means of contacting the shore.”

Published in Rescue
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Donaghadee RNLI’s volunteer lifeboat crew put to sea on Wednesday night (3 July) to rescue three adults and two children who had become stranded on the Copeland Islands following problems with their jetski.

The group had gone to the Co Down islands while the sun was still out but were stranded in the early evening when their jetski began to have mechanical issues.

They used a mobile phone to try and contact both Donaghadee and Bangor lifeboat stations before contacting a crew member on their mobile phone.

Paged at 7pm, the volunteers and made good speed in calm conditions in the RNLI Trent class lifeboat Saxon to Chapel Bay on the Big Copeland Island.

The lifeboat’s smaller XP boat, an inflatable tender carried by Saxon, was launched to go to the shore and bring the casualties to the warmth and safety of the larger lifeboat.

A towline was secured by the volunteer crew and the lifeboat returned to Donaghadee Harbour where the casualties were passed to the care of the coastguard.

Speaking following the callout, Donaghadee RNLI coxswain Philip McNamara said: “I feel we got to the casualties just on time, they were starting to feel the cold after spending quite sometime in the sunshine. They didn’t have any water to hydrate or clothing to keep them warm.”

In other news, Donaghadee’s crew joined tributes to an American couple with strong Northern Ireland roots for a generous $74,000 donation which will help the RNLI to continue saving lives at sea.

The late John Bradley, who grew up and worked in Co Tyrone, and his wife Sally Sue, who he met as a pen pal, donated $37,000 each to Bangor and Donaghadee lifeboat stations, while Tower Lifeboat Station, based next to Waterloo bridge in East London received $5,000.

John, who died on 1 July aged 81, leaves a lasting legacy to the RNLI, with the Bradleys’ donation to be used for vital volunteer crew kit and training.

Peter Irwin, Donaghadee RNLI lifeboat operations manager, said: “We are so grateful and would like to sincerely thank Sally Sue and John, and remember John for his amazing support of the RNLI. We are saddened to hear of John’s death and extend our sympathies to Sally Sue and the Bradley family.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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A man was taken to hospital with hand injuries by Irish Coast Guard helicopter after a Mayday call on a yacht off Kilmore Quay on Saturday (29 June).

The local RNLI lifeboat crew were en route to another vessel that had requested a tow when the call came in from a 12m yacht some 13 miles south-west of the Co Wexford village.

It was reported that as the yacht’s crew were adjusting a sail, a piece of rigging had parted and seriously injured the skipper’s hand.

The lifeboat arrived just after the Waterford-based coastguard helicopter Rescue 117, whose crew determined the best course of action was to transfer the casualty to the lifeboat for pain relief.

He was subsequently winched to the helicopter and flown to Waterford University Hospital for further treatment.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Baltimore RNLI launched yesterday morning (Friday 28 June) after a yacht became propped on a pot buoy two miles south of Mizen Head off the coast of West Cork.

The all-weather lifeboat launched at 10.03am following a request by the Irish Coast Guard to assist the 30ft yacht with one person aboard, which had been on passage from Baltimore to Bere Island.

Arriving on scene at 10.47am in misty and foggy conditions with an easterly Force 3-4 wind, the volunteer crew made a quick assessment of the situation, and launched the smaller Y-class lifeboat to try to free the yacht from the pot buoy while the all-weather lifeboat established a tow.

The pot line was cleared within a few minutes, and after the RNLI crew assessed that all was fine with the vessel, the tow was disconnected and the yacht continued on its journey to Bere Island.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Aran Islands RNLI rescued two sailors after their 38ft yacht got into difficulties off Gorumna Island in Co Galway yesterday morning (Thursday 27 June).

The station received the shout at 7.27am and the lifeboat David Kirkaldy launched under coxswain Tommy Dirrane with a full crew, heading straight for the 38ft yacht that had got tangled in lobster pots in the North Sound.

Conditions on the water were choppy with moderate seas and a 1.5m swell, and an east to north-easterly wind.

Once on scene, the lifeboat crew established contact with the two people aboard the yacht, and found that a local fisherman in the area had freed the vessel from the tangled lobster pots.

The lifeboat then escorted the yacht, which was under sail, as far as the mouth of Kilronan Harbour, where a tow line was established due to steering issues to guide the yacht alongside the pier.

Speaking after the callout, Dirrane said: “Thankfully, this was a good outcome to what could have been a different situation and we would like to commend the local fisherman who also helped.

“As we enjoy the good weather and the summer months ahead, we would like to remind anyone planning a trip to sea to always respect the water.”

“CarrybridgeCarrybridge RNLI with the grounded vessel close to the Share Discovery Village | Photo: RNLI/Carrybridge

Elsewhere, Carrybridge RNLI launched its inshore lifeboat yesterday afternoon to aid a vessel with five on board that had run around around a mile north-west of the Share Discovery Village on Upper Lough Erne.

All on board were found safe and well, and wearing lifejackets. Their vessel was not taking on water, so a tow line was set up to refloat it in deeper water.

After checks for damage gave the all-clear, the vessel was allowed to continue its journey.

Lifeboat operations manager Stephen Scott added: “We would remind all users that before going afloat they should always carry a means of communication and to plan their voyage using relevant charts.

“If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is: 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Portrush RNLI’s volunteer crew were requested to launch at 6.03pm last night (Tuesday 25 June) to reports of two swimmers in difficulty in the vicinity of Dunluce Castle.

Belfast Coastguard’s initial request to launch was based on reports of a man in the water who was unable to get back to shore.

The inshore lifeboat (ILB) crew who were already at the station to undergo assessments launched immediately, and arrived on scene at 6.15pm to discover that there were actually two people in the water.

The second person had entered the water to try to rescue the first swimmer, but was unable to get him back to shore because of the strong tidal stream.

However, the second person was able to keep the first above water until the volunteer crew arrived.

The ILB crew got the two casualties into the lifeboat and transported them back to Portballintrae, where the Northern Ireland Ambulance Service was waiting along with the Air Ambulance NLI. RNLI lifeguards were also in attendance, along with the coastguard.

Keith Gilmore, lifeboat operations manager at Portrush, said: “The swimmer was very lucky that there was someone on scene to assist while the inshore lifeboat launched and arrived on scene.”

He added: “This is the classic scenario that we train for each week, and the crew are very skilled and highly trained for this type of rescue. We would like to wish the two casualties a speedy recovery.”

The condition of the two casualties is unknown at this time.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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The first of three callouts in 24 hours for Baltimore’s RNLI lifeboat volunteers was yesterday morning (Tuesday 25 June), when the all-weather lifeboat was launched to provide medical assistance and evacuation to a man on Cape Clear Island.

The lifeboat arrived at North Harbour in Cape Clear at 11.27am, 20 minutes after launch. The casualty was brought onboard within three minutes and the lifeboat returned to station in Baltimore, handing the casualty over to the care of the waiting HSE ambulance crew at 11.56am.

Baltimore RNLI was called out for a second time in the afternoon to a pleasure boat with engine trouble near the Kedge, east of Baltimore Harbour.

The inshore lifeboat was launched at 3.34pm at the request of the Irish Coast Guard to assist the 31ft pleasure boat, with two onboard, that had broken down east of Kedge Rock which is one mile south-east of the harbour entrance.

The lifeboat, helmed by Kieran Collins with crew members Ian Lynch and David Ryan, reached the casualty vessel at 3.45pm and immediately secured a tow line to its bow.

After confirming the two people onboard were safe and well, they towed the vessel back to its own mooring within Baltimore Harbour.

The third callout came early this morning (Wednesday 26 June) with another medevac, this time from Sherkin Island.

The Baltimore all-weather lifeboat arrived at Sherkin pier at 5.32am, just 10 minutes after launch, and the casualty as brought to the waiting ambulance crew in Baltimore at 5.48am.

Speaking following the callouts, Baltimore RNLI volunteer lifeboat press officer Kate Callanan said: “Our volunteer lifeboat crews are always ready at any time of the day or night to help people in need.

“If you find yourself in difficulty or in need of medical assistance at sea or along the coastline, call 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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This past Saturday 22 June, Larne RNLI opened its doors to the public to celebrate 25 years of saving lives at sea in the local area.

Since the station opened in in 1994, Larne lifeboat volunteers have launched 514 times, saving 34 lives and rescuing 454 people, with an average of 21 shouts per year.

Larne RNLI celebrated this 25th Anniversary milestone with its supporters who have made their work possible on a fun-filled family day with visitors from far and wide taking the opportunity to see the inshore lifeboat up close and meet the local crew.

Visitors — which included Mayor of Mid and East Antrim Maureen Morrow — also had the chance to see a video of recent rescue launches and training to get a real feel for what the Larne volunteers do on a weekly basis.

RNLI lifeguards also attended with their rescue boards and sea safety messages, teaching young and old how to enjoy a trip to the beach safely this summer.

“JuniorJunior crew Isla Kirkpatrick and Megan Ford-Hutchinson helming the inshore lifeboat | RNLI/Larne

Two Northern Ireland Ambulance Service paramedics brought along an ambulance allowing people to step inside, see the equipment they carry and try out being a patient.

Pets as Therapy UK also kindly attended with their dogs allowing peoples of all ages to hear about their work and meet the animals.

The open day was also a fundraiser for the lifeboat, and a total of £772.48 was kindly donated by visitors on the day. This money will go towards the work of Larne RNLI allowing the charity to continue to save lives at sea in the local area.

Phil Ford-Hutchinson, Larne RNLI’s deputy launching authority, said: “We would like to thank everyone who attended, very generously donated and helped make it a very special day.

“We would also like to thank all the local businesses who supported us and helped make our 25th anniversary open day such a success.”

Food was provided by Asda, Woodland Woodies, Creed, McDowells, Bake, Ann’s Pantry and Upper Crust. Got U Covered Gazebos provided shade from the sun, DJ Stephen Snoddy provided music, and Larne Port Ltd provided free parking for visitors. The event was also supported by Mid and East Antrim Borough Council and East Antrim Boat Club.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Kilkeel RNLI’s volunteer crew launched at 1.20pm yesterday (Sunday 23 June) to go to the aid of the 44ft French yacht with two people onboard that was stranded two miles off Annalong Harbour in Co Down.

In fresh conditions with good visibility, the lifeboat volunteers found that the yacht had become stranded due to a rope in the propeller.

The crew, with Gary Young as helm, managed to retrieve the rope and free the yacht.

A crew member went aboard the yacht to check everything was well and finding everything was in order, he returned to the lifeboat and the yacht went on its way to continue its journey north.

Speaking following the callout, volunteer press officer Leslie Campbell said: “As we approach the summer months, we would remind all sea users regardless of their activity to always respect the water.

“Always wear a lifejacket, always carry a means of communication and always let someone on the shore know where you are going and what time you will be due back.

“Should you get into difficulty or see someone in trouble dial 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Page 4 of 97

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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