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Displaying items by tag: Lucifer Bank

#buoys – A vital Aid to Navigation buoy deployed by the Commissioners of Irish Lights to mark the Lucifer Bank on the South East Coast of Ireland has sustained significant damage due to a collision with an unidentified vessel on 13th May 2014. The day mark's electric system received extensive damage causing the lights to fail on the buoy.

Ireland's economy relies heavily on trade as approximately 95% of our imports and exports are carried on ships. Aids to Navigation such as Buoys, Beacons and Lighthouses are critical to the safety of all mariners, essential for our economy and are an integral element in the transport chain. These aids protect life, property, business and the marine environment while keeping the sea routes safely open and running smoothly. A missing aid can put lives at risk and unreported damage to these aids can have significant consequences.

Appealing for more responsible behaviour from seafarers, Captain Robert McCabe, Director of Operations and Navigational Services of the Commissioners of Irish Lights commented; "I am horrified to think that any seafarer would leave a damaged aid to navigation unreported. Such disregard for fellow seafarers is entirely at odds with our training and tradition. I appeal to mariners to report such incidents; the cost of repair will never outweigh the potential cost of a human life".

The tradition at sea has always been to immediately report damage so other users are notified and the aid can be restored without delay to its full working capacity. In a number of mounting cases, rogue mariners have damaged buoys and failed to take responsibility for their actions. The risk to such irresponsible action posed by these mariners dwarfs any potential cost to the perpetrators.

The Merchant Shipping Acts make provision for the imposition of a fine on any person who wilfully or negligently runs foul of, or makes fast to, any Buoy or Beacon, and for the recovery of the expenses for repairing any resulting damage. Mariners are requested to immediately report any defect in any Aid to Navigation either to the Commissioners of Irish Lights 24-Hour Monitoring Centre, telephone number +353-1-2801996 or to the nearest Coast Radio Station.

Published in Lighthouses

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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