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Displaying items by tag: National Maritime Museum

A new exhibition of classic racing boat paintings by Afloat.ie reader James Gilna opens today (Wednesday 18 September) at the National Maritime Museum in Dun Laoghaire.

And the artist himself will be in attendance to discuss the works included in The Windward Mark from 5.30pm this Friday 20 September as part of Culture Night activities nationwide.

Paintings in the exhibition, which runs until Sunday 20 October, feature classic sailboats such as the Dublin Bay 21s and Howth 17s racing at Kingstown Harbour and in various locations around the Irish Sea.

A maritime artist based in Dublin, James Gilna is an alumnus of Dun Laoghaire School of Art and Design and the National College of Art and Design. He also sails and races Erica, his classic gaff rigged boat which was designed in 1897.

Earlier this year, Gilna tipped us to the auction of a painting by renowned maritime artist Montague Dawson of a boat supposedly racing on Lough Derg.

The events depicted in the painting were subsequently questioned by a Lough Derg yachting historian, who raised a number of points where Dawson may have taken artistic licence with his work.

Published in Dublin Bay

#RMSconnaught - In 2018 is the centenary of the sinking of mail-boat RMS Leinster off the Kish Light by a German U-Boat in WWI, what is less well known is the sinking of sister RMS Connaught on 3 March 1917.

To mark the historic occasion the National Maritime Museum of Ireland, Dun Laoghaire is to host a lecture about the event by distinguised author and historian Phillip Lecane.

The Lecture: "Leinster's Sister: The Sinking of RMS Connaught" is to take place in the Maritime Museum, Haigh Terrace on Thursday 2 March. 

 

Doors Open at 19.30 for lecture beginning at 20.00rs
 
Tickets cost €10.00 payable at door or by booking through Eventbrite which excludes a surcharge.
 
Also to this email: [email protected] and by contacting (01) 214 3964
 
 

 

 

Published in Coastal Notes

#MusicINmusuem – An evening of baroque music by Galerum Gabrielis is to be held in the National Maritime Museum of Ireland, Haigh Terrace, Dun Laoghaire on Thursday 11 June (8:00 pm - 10:00 pm)

A wonderful evening of the finest Baroque music will be given an unusual presentation in the venue of the former Mariners Church by Evin Kelly (Bayan) and Norah O'Leary (Baroque Cello).

The range of music will be from G.P. Telemann; G.B. Vitali; J.S. Bach; G. Frescobaldi and A. Vivaldi

Tickets available before the concert or at the door. €10.00 per head

The museum also has a gift shop and café. For further details and information visit: www.mariner.ie

Published in Boating Fixtures

#LectureLusitania – The Building of the Lusitania is the lecture topic that Cormac Lowth will present in conjunction with the National Maritime Museum of Ireland in Dun Laoghaire next Thursday, 30th April.

Cormac's illustrated lecture will tell the story of the building of the Cunard Line's RMS Lusitania's fateful last journey 100 year ago when she was struck by a U-Boat torpedo during WW1 off the Old Head of Kinsale on 7 May 1915. It is generally considered as being the most significant reason for the United States to finally decide to declare war on Germany.

In addition Cormac will delve into the mysteries of her alleged cargo, the second explosion, salvage attempts and the Special Preservation Order.

Lecture Information: Admission is €10.00 (payable at door from 7.30pm) followed by the talk at 8.00pm. Bookings can also be made be email: [email protected] or Tel: (01) 2143 964

The Maritime Institute of Ireland museum on Haigh Terrace, Dun Laoghaire will also staging a special exhibition on the disaster during the month of May.

The museum also has a gift shop and café. For further details and informantion visit: www.mariner.ie

Published in Boating Fixtures

#McNamaraConcert - Frank McNamara, will play a once-off concert next month in the National Maritime Museum of Ireland, Dun Laoghaire.

The internationally known arranger, conductor, composer, and pianist would be familiar to many as the Musical Director of the Late Late show for over 20 years.

Tickets for the evening two-hour concert (8-10pm) on next Saturday, 30th May cost €20.

They are available through either [email protected] or Tel: 01 2143 964

For further information in general about the Maritime Institute of Ireland's museum on Haigh Terrace, Dun Laoghaire which has also a gift shop and café visit: www.mariner.ie

Published in Boating Fixtures

#LectureLusitania – The Building of the Lusitania, that's the title of the next lecture to be held in National Maritime Museum of Ireland in Dun Laoghaire next Thursday. 30th April.

The centenary lecture beginning at 8:00pm is to be presented by Cormac Lowth, who will accompany the talk with illustrations.

Lowth's Lusitania lecture running for two-hours is been held in conjunction with an exhibition in the Museum's beautiful restored former Mariners Church building.

The exhibition tells the story of her last fateful journey, the mysteries of her alleged cargo, the second explosion, salvage attempts and the special preservation order.

Lecture Information: Admission is €10.00 (payable at door from 7.30pm).

Bookings can also be made be email: [email protected] or Tel: (01) 2143 964

For further information about the Maritime Institute of Ireland's museum (including a gift shop and cafe) on Haigh Terrace, Dun Laoghaire, visit: www.mariner.ie

Published in Boating Fixtures

#LectureDublinPilot – The Story of a Dublin Port Pilot, that's the title of the next lecture to be held in National Maritime Museum of Ireland in Dun Laoghaire next Thursday.

The two-hour lecture starts at 8:00 pm and will be presented by Captain Jim Kennedy, a retired Pilot from Dublin Port. Kennedy will talk about the interesting, exciting and amusing account of life guiding the great ships into Dublin Port in all weathers.

Over the years on Afloat.ie we have mentioned the port's current pair of Safehaven Marine built Interceptor 42 class pilot cutters as they head out into Dublin Bay to transfer pilots to and fro from ships.

The names given to the Youghal built cutters Liffey and Camac and others have over the years been named after the famous river and tributaries.

Camac and Liffey were launched into service as part of a new suite of port work related vessels that featured in Afloat magazine (May 2009) issue. In addition for a photo of Camac as she prepares to come alongside a container vessel departing Dublin Bay, click here.

Lecture Information: Admission is €10.00 (payable at door from 7.30pm) followed by the talk at 8.00pm. Bookings can also be made be email: [email protected] or Tel: (01) 2143 964

For further information in general about the Maritime Institute of Ireland's museum on Haigh Terrace, Dun Laoghaire which has also a gift shop and café visit: www.mariner.ie

Published in Boating Fixtures

#LectureSailing - Sailing the World: The First Leg Ireland to New Zealand will be a fascinating fundraiser lecture held in aid of the National Maritime Museum of Ireland, Dun Laoghaire.

The talk presented by Pat & Olivia Murphy is next Wednesday 25 February.

The Murphy's will recount all the drama as the intrepid voyagers experienced many an adventure. The presentation will also be accompanied by a slide-show lavishly illustrated with high-quality photos.

The First Leg – Ireland to New Zealand starts with the voyage across the Atlantic, the transitting of the Panama Canal, turtle-watching and the crocodiles!

In addition to coveraing their adventures to the Galapagos Islands, Polynesia & The Cook Islands and encountering a storm on the Tasman Sea.

Lecture Information: Admission is €10.00 (payable at door from 7.30pm) followed by the talk at 8.00 pm

Bookings can also be made be email: [email protected] or Tel: 01 2143 964

Tea and Coffee will be served before and after the talk.

For further information in general about the Maritime Institute of Ireland's museum on Haigh Terrace, Dun Laoghaire which has also a gift shop and café visit: www.mariner.ie

Published in Boating Fixtures

#Wine&TableQuiz- Come along for a fun night combining a Table Quiz & Christmas Wine Tasting on Thursday 11 December (doors open 7.15pm) at the Eblana Club (off Marine Road) in Dun Laoghaire. The festive evening is to raise funds for the local National Maritime Museum of Ireland.

A selection of wines to match your Christmas feast will be available to taste.

Following this there will be the Table Quiz (8.30pm). The familiar mix of obvious and obscure questions are guaranteed to infuriate all who take part.

Tickets for the festive fundraiser event are €10.00 each and available from the door. In addition for more information on bookings made by email [email protected] or by contacting (01) 2143 964

Published in Boating Fixtures

#islandnation – Why is it that women have been written out of the history of the Irish fishing industry and that in Ireland we ignore the economic opportunities which can be obtained from associating with pirates?

Those are two of the fascinating questions which arose at the symposium about the Irish Sea held in the National Maritime Museum in Dun Laoghaire on Saturday.

The "History, Culture, Environment" of the Irish Sea and whether it should be considered a place, a sea, or a connecting corridor of social, economic and trade importance between the people on both sides of the sea, would that seem a topic of general or limited interest to you?

It should be and what emerged during the day-long symposium was fascinating.

For example, they liked their smugglers in Rush in North County Dublin, so much that in the 1800s the Revenue could only get one man to remain in the village for any length of time before he was chased out, as the locals preferred the smugglers. But why, Joe Varley of the Institute asked, when presenting research done by Maighread Ní Murchadha about the Irish Revenue Boatmen from 1684-1766, do we Irish not make more of the opportunities which the maritime history about smugglers now makes available?

"I think we are a bit behind in the way we develop that. You go to Devon and Cornwall there is every escapade, whether real or made up, about smugglers. There are Smugglers' Coves, Smugglers' Inns, festivals about smuggling and they all attract people into the areas, so there is a great commercial potential. So why in the various parts of Ireland where there are smugglers' traditions, is that not used?

"They loved their smugglers in Rush. There were seven Revenue Boatmen in Skerries, seven in Portrane, eight or nine down in Malahide, all around the same area, in the 18th and early 19th centuries, which was the golden age of smuggling, but always just one brave soul in Rush and he wasn't very welcome! Indeed the locals weren't very welcoming to the Revenue generally and used them for their own purposes. In some areas those who operated as smugglers even gave them accommodation in their own homes as lodgers, so they would know when the Revenue were out on patrol and they could time their smuggling for when the Revenue were ashore!"

IRISH_SEA_SYMPOSIUM.jpg

So, just think of all the opportunities around the coast to benefit from historical smuggling – not mind you the current type we have seen in recent years with drugs smuggling!

In the 18th century Rush (pictured below) was regarded as a "Smugglers' nest." One of the most well-known smugglers from there was Luke Ryan, born locally in 1750. He emigrated to France and obtained a commission as a Lieutenant in Dillon's Irish Regiment. After some time he returned to Rush and began operating as a smuggler between Ireland and France.

RUSH_HARBOUR_DUBLIN.jpg

From 1775 until 1783 France sympathised with the Americans during the War of Independence and the French government commissioned Ryan as the Commander of a privateer, The Black Prince, which for several years plundered English ships around the English coast. In 1782 English forces captured Ryan and he was convicted in the Old Bailey in London on charges of piracy, smuggling and treason and condemned to death. He had a charmed life, however. Ordered to the gallows four times, four times he was reprieved. At the conclusion of the war, the French intervened on his behalf and secured his release. Unfortunately, his nest egg, some £70, 000, a lot of money at the time and which he had amassed from smuggling and privateering, was appropriated by French bankers. He died in a debtors' prison in 1789, where he was detained for a debt of £200.

Another Rush smuggler was Jack Connor, a native of Wexford, who practised his trade from what was known as 'The Smugglers' Cave,' located between Loughshinney and Skerries. Described as a "romantic and swashbuckling character," he was popular in high society and it was believed his cave held rich treasures taken during smuggling, but that it was guarded by a green serpent. The cave has never been properly located!

WOMEN CARRYING MEN ON THEIR BACKS

The women of the Claddagh in Galway were so powerful physically, that they often met their men at the boats when they came back from fishing and carried the men ashore on their backs, as well as setting the prices for the fish, cleaning and selling them.

"They were big, powerful women, the Claddagh women," Jim McLaughlin, a political geographer and social scientist, who has lectured at UCC for over 25 years, described them when he made the point that it was strange, because the fishing industry depended upon them, that women had been written out of its history.

"In old photographs you can see fish piled up on the pier, the women cutting and filleting them, the men in black suits who were the merchants looking on, ready to buy the fish."

But the women were disregarded as lower-class because they were doing the tough, dirty job of filleting the fish, blood and guts around the place and they were considered a bit wild. So is that where the 'fishwife' derogatory term came from?

"Women who worked in a men's world were considered of dubious background and quality and were crossing barriers. They were treated badly and their story should be told, perhaps starting with the photographs from around the fishing ports, but there is a huge job of research work and I don't see too many people rushing to do it, but women have been badly treated in the history of the fishing industry."

Professor John Brannigan of UCD's School of English, Drama and Film, one of the organisers of the symposium said he was surprised that, as Ireland had such a wonderful maritime heritage, we have no developed sense of studying that history. Maritime history is not an academic subject, whereas in the UK there are well-developed centres of maritime heritage.

"I am curious why that is the situation when people like to live by the sea, there is a clear value commercially from the sea, which is all very important to an island community which we are in Ireland, so there is a vast amount of research work to be done."

On the way back into Dublin on the DART from Dun Laoghaire I could see occasionally the Dublin Bay sailing fleet on the water for Saturday racing. But quite regularly it was cut off from vision by the high walls around the track and at stations. Unfortunate for a railway running alongside the Irish Sea.

TWO_HEADED_DOLPHIN.jpg

TWO-HEADED DOLPHIN

Scientists have not been able to come up with a reason for a dead two-headed dolphin that washed ashore in in Izmir in Turkey, only the fifth known case of conjoined twins in dolphins. The rate of conjoined twins in marine mammals is less than one percent.

USS_JAMES_WILLIAMS.jpg

US NAVY SACKS MISSILE DESTROYER OFFICERS

The US Navy is continuing investigations into the situation that emerged aboard its missile destroyer, the USS James E. Williams, part of the 6th Fleet operating with the US Africa Command. The ship's Commanding Officer, Executive Officer and Command Master Chief, effectively the entire command leadership, were fired from their posts in a rare move, while the vessel was at sea, as a result of what has been described as "an on-going climate investigation." The ship departed her homeport of Norfolk on May 30 for an eight-month deployment.

RADIO_OFFICERS.jpg

FIRST FOR IRELAND BY RADIO OFFICERS

Since its foundation in 1994, the Radio Officers' Association, for the former 'Sparks' of the sea waves, has grown to 400 members worldwide. For the first time, Ireland has been selected for a re-union of its members. This will take place in Dun Laoghaire on the weekend of November 21/22.

WHAT_DO_YACHTIES_WANT.jpg

WHAT DO 'YACHTIES' WANT?

Fáilte Ireland is examining the coastal infrastructure in Ireland to find out what the expectations of sailors are. The tourist industry organisation has begun a market research initiative on consumer preferences for sailing, focusing on the infrastructure, facilities and services required to make Ireland a more attractive destination for sailing amongst domestic and overseas sailing enthusiasts.

LIMERICK A SLAVE PORT

While Ireland was never known to have been involved in slaving or having slave ships, research shows that in 1784 Limerick was the first Irish port to attempt to develop a slave-trade company. And in July 1718 a Limerick ship transported 96 slaves from Africa to Barbados, while two Dublin-based ships, the Sylva and the Sophia, were recorded slaving in the Gambia in May 1716. Africans being transported to Jamaica on the Sophia revolted, killing all of the crew except the Captain, according to historical reports.

So, a lot of maritime history this week.... Until next week, the usual wish of .....
"fair sailing..."

Email: [email protected]
Twitter:  @AfloatMagazine @Tom MacSweeney

Published in Island Nation
Page 1 of 2

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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