Menu

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

In association with ISA Logo Irish Sailing

Displaying items by tag: National Yacht Club

With the confirmation that Kinsale Yacht Club will be hosting the Half Ton Classic Worlds from August 14th to 18th 2017, Irish interest will intensify further in a class which already attracts much favourable attention. W M Nixon tells us more about a popular boat type which will have a defending champion from Ireland when the Worlds get under way in Falmouth in Cornwall in a week’s time.

If today’s newcomers to sailing find the resurrection of old offshore racing classes which are apparently only identified by specific weights a bit bewildering, then they can blame the first Commodore of the National Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire.

The first Commodore of the NYC in 1931 was the Earl of Granard. The club had been founded in 1870 as the Kingstown Royal Harbour Boat Club, and in 1901 it became the Edward Yacht Club in honour of one of Queen Victoria’s many offspring. But with the new mood of the times after Irish Independence in 1922, such a name just wouldn’t do. Nevertheless it was a very sporting gesture when one of the landed aristocracy proposed the new no-nonsense name in 1930, giving it a fair wind by agreeing to be Commodore the following year.

Thus the big change to becoming “The National Yacht Club” was made respectable. But then, the Earl of Granard was a well-respected sailing man in his own right, despite the fact that his ancestral pile in County Longford was about as far from the sea as you can get in Ireland.

Admittedly there was sailing nearby with the North Shannon Yacht Club on Lough Forbes, which incidentally is named after the earl’s family – they were connected to the Forbes of the famous business magazine in America. However, despite the joys of sailing on Lough Forbes, the Earl had long been into bigger things on the international scene, though his interest still had an inland waterways aspect. In 1899 he’d presented a magnificent silver cup to the leading French sailing club, the Cercle de la Voile de Paris (CVP) for an international competition, to be sailed on the River Seine near Paris or on the Solent at Cowes, with the racing between boats which weighed one ton.

Although the trophy’s official name was the Coupe Internationale du Cercle de la Voile de Paris, it soon became known as the One Ton Cup, and continued to be so named even when racing was between yachts of the International 6 Metre Class, despite their weighing several tons apiece.

One Ton Cup 2The cause of all the trouble – the One Ton Cup was presented to the CVP by the Earl of Granard, future Commodore of the National YC, in 1898, and was first raced for in 1899.
The magnificent cup remained as beautiful as ever, but with World War II it became almost forgotten until 1965, when the CVP proposed using it for an inshore-offshore international series for yachts rating at 22ft under the RORC rule, which worked out to be boats around the 36-37ft mark. The idea took off like a rocket - level-rating racing among diverse boats was an idea whose time had come. Very quickly, a whole range of additional international rating levels arose, with Two Tonners around 40-42ft, Three Quarter Tonners around 34ft, Half Tonners around 30ft, Quarter Tonners around 25ft, Mini-Tonners around 21ft, and they even had Micro-Tonners at about 18ft.

Ton Classes 3The Ton Classes at their peak

It all worked very well for twenty years and more in some cases (the last Half Tonner was built in 1992), with the boat sizes staying broadly the same size range, but with the ratings changed to accommodate the RORC rule being replaced by the IOR. And Irish sailing certainly had its moments in this continuing circus of various offshore racing acts. In 1974 the Ron Holland-designed, Cork–built 36ft Golden Apple somehow became more famous than the winner by being runner up the One Ton Worlds. But then in 1976, Harold Cudmore and a youthful crew from Cork put all questions aside by managing to get the new race-prepared Ron Holland-designed 30ft Silver Shamrock to Trieste for the Half Ton Worlds, and he won in style, famously celebrating by sailing up the Grand Canal in Venice with spinnaker set.

Half Ton World champion Silver Shamrock 4The 1976 Half Ton World champion Silver Shamrock, getting an end-of-season lift-out at her current home port of Penzance in CornwallSilver Shamrock sailing 5 See the conquering heroes come…….Silver Shamrock sailing up the Grand Canal in Venice after winning the Half Ton Worlds 1976 in Trieste under Harold Cudmore’s command. Ronnie Dunphy on left, Killian Bushe on foredeck

In 1981 he was back on top again, winning the One Ton Worlds at Crosshaven with the Castro-design Justine IV owned by Frank Woods (NYC). But by this time the boats involved were very different in form from those skinny-sterned designs which had dominated in the earlier 1970s, as a fresh wave of New Zealand designers like Bruce Farr and Laurie Davidson had been showing what could be achieved with broader sterns and better offwind performance.

The Half Ton Worlds was won in 1977, ’78 and ’79 by Kiwi boats of this type. But though she was not the overall winner, Ian Gibbs’ Farr-designed Swuzzlebubble was the one everyone remembered best, as she was on the podium one year as a centreboarder, and back there in the top three the year after, but this time as a keelboat.

Swuzzlebubble 1976The new wave arrives from New Zealand – Swuzzlebubble in 1979
The following year she arrived in Ireland in the ownership of Bruce Lyster of Royal St George in Dun Laoghaire, and he won the ISORA Championship in 1980, plus ISORA Week and just about everything for which the boat was eligible in Cowes Week.

He had an exceptional crew of all the talents with Robert Dix, Drewry Pearson and Des Cummins, and Dixie remembers her as one of the most wonderful boats he ever sailed: “She found her own way to peak performance so effortlessly that you’d almost be scared to do anything which might adversely effect the trim” he quips.

He continues to say that even though Bruce Lyster sold Swuzzlebubble to Greece at season’s end, as you simply couldn’t improve on a season like they’d had in 1980. The Three Musketeers meanwhile transferred aboard Ken Rohan’s 40ft Regardless, with which they won their class big time in the 1981 Fastnet.

Regardless would be on most people’s short list for the greatest Irish racing yacht ever, yet Robert Dix remembers the previous season with Swuzzlebubble with even more enthusiasm. So it’s intriguing that at next week’s Henri Lloyd Half Ton Classics Worlds, the new wave of Irish Classic Half Ton sailors will be taking on Swuzzlebubble for the first time.

The story of her re-birth is typical of the modern revival of the very best of the old Ton Cup boats, with the One Ton Championship itself being revived for its Golden Jubilee in New Zealand in 2015 with a classic fleet. As for Swuzzlebubble, she was discovered in a very poor way indeed in a Greek boatyard in 2012, but was brought back to life by the King of Cowes, Peter Morton, who duly won the Half Ton Classics Worlds in Brittany in 2014 with her.

Swuzzlebubble wreck 7Next stop, the landfill site? Swuzzlebubble as she was found in Greece in 2012
half ton Swuzzlebubble restored 8Swuzzlebubble restored, on her way to winning the Half Ton Classics in Brittany in 2014

However, Swuzzlebubble wasn’t campaigned in the 2015 series in Belgium, when Dave Cullen took the trophy for Ireland with Checkmate XV. So there has been an air of unfinished business about these two rather special boats floating about the ocean without actually locking horns, but that’s all going to be changed in Falmouth.

Dave Cullen Checkmate XV 9Dave Cullen on the helm as Checkmate XV makes a start to die for at the Half Ton Worlds in Belgium, 2015Dave Cullen crew 10Winners take all – Dave Cullen and his crew with the trophy after victory last year

In fact, it has become Howth versus Falmouth, as Swuzzlebubble is now Falmouth-owned by Gregory Peck who, in a very varied sailing career, was one of the crew with Dickie Gomes aboard the 83ft catamaran Novanet when a new Round Ireland Record was established in November 1986, but that’s another story altogether.

However, in Falmouth there’ll be other boats involved too, as the word is they might muster as many as 30 entries, which is as big a fleet as anyone could reasonably wish for. The remarkable Howth/Fingal contingent will be there in full strength, as Checkmate XV will be taking the road with Jonny Swann’s Harmony, Michael and Richard Evans’ The Big Picture, and the David Kelly and Patrick Boardman team from Rush SC with King One, Half Ton World Champion in 1981.

It’s an intriguing mixture of nostalgia and modernity, as the boats get revamped to new ideas, yet they always carry their history lightly but definitely with them. In the case of the Howth boats, much of the technical work in revamping is done by ace boatbuilder Alan Power of Malahide, who appropriately is a powerboat nut himself, but his ability to think outside the usual boat-building box makes him the ideal man to undertake crazy notions for addicts of old but still potent offshore racers.

Half tonners Big Picture Checkmate XV 11Preparation zone…..The Big Picture (left) and Checkmate XV undergoing modifications with Power Marine in Malahide back in April. Photo: W M Nixon

In line with this aim of maximising performance, the Howth/Fingal crewing lineup will include some formidable talent from all over Ireland, with Dave Cullen leading the charge with his 2015 crew of Johnny Murphy, Gary Cullen (no relation), Aidan Beggan, Mark Pettit, James Hynes and Andy George.

The crew on The Big Picture meanwhile have roped in Mark Mansfield of Cork, who is having a great year of it in a variety of boats, while the jockey for King One is young Marty O’Leary, one of the bright new talents to emerge in recent years from Courtown in County Wexford.

Down Falmouth way, it’s going to be Classic Half Ton Racing at its classic best. And if you wonder why it is that the Half Tonners seem to have been the most successful of all the Ton classes in reviving themselves after more than fifty years, perhaps the answer is that at 30ft they’re big enough as boats to be taken seriously, yet small enough to be a manageable proposition for keeping in top order and raced keenly.

half ton Classics fleet 12The contemporary Half Ton Classics lineup – the boats are big enough to be taken seriously, yet small enough to be manageable

Published in Half Tonners

Yesterday's Laser Leinster Championships at the National Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire has started a two week period of Laser dinghy racing action on Dublin Bay in advance of next week's KBC Laser Radial World Championships.

Yesterday's prizegiving saluted winners in Standard, Radial and 4.7 divisions.

For a report and results click here

 
Published in Laser

This year’s National Yacht Club Nippers course at the East Pier at Dun Laoghaire welcomed the largest group of eager children than ever before to the club. Over six weeks in May and June, adventurous 6-8 year olds dipped their toe into sailing, many of them for the first time writes the club's Fiona Staunton.

The NYC Nippers course is based on the Cara na Mara curriculum. Cara na Mara provides a child-centred approach to introducing children to sailing and the marine environment. The programme allows children to discover, explore and practise the skills and knowledge they will need as sailors.

For two hours on a Wednesday evening, the children took turns on the water every week in a range of crafts, Optimists, Fevas, kayaks and paddle boards, either individually or in small groups. And whilst the Nippers spent most of their time on the water, the programme is not just about sailing.

The curriculum also covers safety at sea, sailing skills, weather and the marine environment. Indeed, a favourite with the Nippers is ‘water theory’, as invented by NYC’s brilliant instructors, where children are asked a range of questions about boat handling and safety at sea and the ‘punishment’ for giving a wrong answer is to be pushed off the pontoon…to delighted squeals from each child as it splashes into the water!

The NYC Nippers is a great way of introducing young children to sailing and fostering a love and respect for the sea. It would not be nearly as much fun without NYC’s fantastic instructors or the older children for the NYC’s Junior Section who helmed the various boats and actively encouraged their young friends to have a go. As always, it would not be possible without the parents who volunteered for ‘shore duty’ on the night and Sarah and Henrietta who organised the programme.

A big shout out goes to the Dun Laoghaire fire brigade who provided the star attraction on the last night. Their visit to the NYC gave each Nipper a chance to take the wheel of a real fire engine and turns at sounding the (very loud!) sirens. Now that was an experience that will take some beating!

We hope that many of our 2016 Nippers will return next year to build on their sailing skills and rekindle the friendships they made over the last six weeks.

Published in Youth Sailing

The National Yacht Club's new initiative to encourage more ladies sailing showed the level of its success with its all female crew entry in the 1720 Europeans held recently on Dublin Bay. The team consisted of a group of mums who either wanted to get back into sailing again after a few years break or those who were completely new to racing but wanted to give it a try. They chartered the club 1720 and trained hard coming up to the event competing in the DBSC newly created Sportsboat class on Tuesday evenings. The event, won by Royal Cork's Anthony O'Leary attracted sailing Olympians and the standard of competition is always extremely high in these fast exciting boats, so it was a steep learning curve for the NYC team. They have had lots of fun along the way with new friendships made and a big sense of achievement when those starts and gybes go just right!

The next plan is to travel further afield and enter the 1720 Nationals in Kinsale later this season. As word has spread the club now also has a ladies boat competing in the clubs RS Venture and aims to expand this further as demand among their members grows. By supporting this Women on the Water project the NYC now has a thriving group of new female sailors.

 

Published in National YC

Last weekend's National Yacht Club regatta on Dublin Bay provided racing for cruisers, keelboats and dinghies across 27 classes. Full results in each class are downloadable below class by class. Check out our photo gallery slideshow by Joe Fallon below too! Next up in the Dubin Bay regatta season is tomorrow's Royal Irish YC regatta.

Published in National YC
Tagged under

Running on the same day as the Round Ireland Race from Wicklow, June 18th's National Yacht Club regatta at Dun Laoghaire Harbour incorporates an appropriate Bloomsday theme for its day long festivities. Featuring two races back to back, 22 classes will race on three courses starting from 11.30 am. Ashore, a Midsummer BBQ, a Black Tie ball and regatta prizegiving are pitched as a summer highlight of Dun Laoghaire's waterfront activities. Download the Notice of Race and flyer below. 

Published in National YC
Tagged under

Irish boats took a class win and a second in class at this year's Silvers Marine Scottish Series that ended yesterday. The National Yacht Club's John and Brian Hall won IRC Class 2 in an incredibly tight class across the whole weekend. It couldn't have ended any closer with just one point separating the top three boats. See IRC2 results below.The Hall's pulled out all the stops on J109 Something Else to net a second and third which was enough to end the day on top of the table. The Dublin Bay SC boat ended the regatta on equal points with the brilliantly sailed Sloop John T and Iain Thomson, who came into Monday topping the leader board, but who failed to capitalise on their advantage. And we have to also give mention to Christine Murray and Triple Elf who sailed a great regatta to come in third overall. Last year's champion, Fools Gold from Waterford finished eighth from 12.

In IRC Class 3 the very well sailed J/97 Lambay Rules by Stephen Quinn from Howth Yacht Club was second overall to Roddy Angus and Dan Challis who continued their domination of this class securing a first and a second in the day's two races to end the event a point and a half clear of second place. Darge Black McVey and Phoenix took a well deserved third place in the class.

Having a perfect regatta is never easy, and when, you add a regatta as prestigious as Silvers Marine Scottish Series to the mix, it's an almost impossible feat. However, Dara O'Malley and Seaword from Port Edgar Yacht Club achieved just that, taking not just their class win but also lifting the Silvers Marine Scottish Series trophy.

Sailing in the Hunter 707 class Seaword finished the weekend with a near perfect scoreline, so impressing Silvers Marine Scottish Series Event Chairman David Denholm and his committee, that they awarded them the top prize.

Other prizewinners were:

Callum Bell who takes home the Crawford McInnes Trophy for Best Under 25 Helm, sponsored by Hempel Paints.
Hempel Paints Youth Prizes went to: Callum Tait; Jake Miller; Janey Campbell and Tony Fitzgerald.
Rose Bowl awarded to the yacht which in the opinion of the Race Committee has given the best performance in the IRC handIcap classes in the Series – Aurora
The Tarbert Shield awarded to the yacht which, in the opinion of the Race Committee has given the best performance in the CYCA handicap classes in the Series – Thrust
The Anchor Hotel Trophy awarded to the yacht which, in the opinion of the Race Committee has given the best performance of all competitors in the One Design classes in the Series: Seaword
The Lemarac Tankard awarded to the yacht which, in the opinion of the Race Committee has given the best performance of all competitors in the Restricted Sail classes in the Series – Brave
The Sinbad Trophy awarded to the best family yacht, regardless of class or results, as judged by representatives of the organising committee – Chaos
The Causeway Cup awarded to the entry from Ireland which in the opinion of the Race Committee gives the best performance of the IRC classes in the Series (other than the winner of the Sail Scotland Trophy and the Silvers Marine Scottish Series Trophy, if appropriate) – Something Else
The Sail Scotland Trophy awarded to the yacht normally based outwith Scotland which in the opinion of the Race Committee gives the best performance of all yachts in the Series (other than the winner of the Silvers Marine Scottish Series Trophy, if appropriate) – USA208 VXI Ovington Boats
The Silvers Marine Scottish Series Trophy awarded to the yacht which, in the opinion of the Race Committee has given the best performance of all competitors in the Series - Seaword
IRC Class 1 Having sailed a near perfect regatta, Rod Stuart and Bill Ram's Aurora secured a first and second place today to seal victory and end the regatta five points clear of Silvers Marine Scottish Series sponsor Jamie McGarry and Colin Moore's Eala of Rhu. And, with a second and a first today Prime Suspect and Charlie Frize take third spot. This has been a hugely entertaining battle to watch and, going into the final day, there was still all to play for.

CYCA 5 There will be celebrations in Oban Sailing Club tonight as Richard Shellcock and Thrust top the table in CYCA 5. Their first and third today made sure they ended the regatta five points ahead of last year's class winner Alan Dunnet and Valhalla of Ashton. Having a great day out on the water today, taking a second and a first, saw John Corson and Salamander XXII end the regatta in third place.

CYCA Class 8 Well done to David and Karen Parker's Slippi Gin who slid into first place, winning their race today to end the weekend on top. There's been a real battle between Slippi Gin and Brian Robertson's Celtic Spirit who went into the final day leading the table. However, it wasn't their day and, with Owen Mcmanus and Jochr taking a second place, they made sure they ended up where they were last year, in second spot, with Celtic Spirit in third.

CYCA Class 9 Ken Allan and S Shearer's Brave have looked like class champions from the start of the weekend, with a perfect scoreline. They are worthy winners, with Silvers Marine Scottish Series sponsor Boyd Tunnock in Lemarac picking up second and Honey Bee and Iain Cameron in third.

Sigma 33 There were no surprises today in the Sigma 33 class with James Miller and Mayrise holding onto the top spot, ahead of Harper and Robertson's Leaky Roof 2 and Donald McLaren's Sigmatic.

National Sonata One Design Series The first and third places of Douglas Paton and Edgy, were enough to edge their way to victory in the class today. This has been a very exciting class to watch all weekend as B Wiseman and Guy Neville's Virtuoso sailed an equally consistent race. Ross MacNeish and Old School had a good result to take third place overall.

VX One In the end Brian Bennett and Ovington Boats had the upper hand, and securing two first places today go on take the class. Jono Shelley and Abracadabra ran out of magic and will have to be content with a solid second place ahead of the Lead Sled and Neal Piper in third.

Hunter 707 Class winner and Silvers Marine Scottish Series champions Dara O'Malley and Seaword just haven't put a foot wrong this weekend and, with two wins today end the series six points clear of John and Stewart Robertson's Cacciatore who were, in turn, six points clear of Neil McLure's Blue Funk.

Published in Scottish Series

Royal Cork's Nick Walsh was the winner of the Irish Laser Master Championships at the National Yacht Club at the weekend. The Crosshaven man beat local Dublin Bay Sailing Club's Dan O'Connell on the tie break rule after both sailors finished on the same nett points of 14 after six races sailed. In third place in a 26–boat fleet was Royal St. George Yacht Club helmsman Sean Craig on 19 points. Paul Ebrill of Wexford Harbour Boat Club was the winner of a five boat Radial fleet. Results are downloadable below. 

This popular event, open to Lasers Sailors aged 35 and over, is now in it's 10th year and firmly positioned as an annual favourite with the class members.

This year the fleet was bouyed by many new faces and a fledgling radial fleet both of which are very positive future signs.

Cork as usual sent a strong contingent, Wexford too was represented, Galway provided some of the new faces and Ballyholme sent a boutique but talented squadron of challengers. From closer to home it was great to see support from Howth YC. The RStG really padded out the numbers with a large showing and local boats also launched from the RIYC, DMYC and Coal Harbour for a total of 35 racing.

Ron Hutchieson was, as usual, officiating shoreside ably assisted at registration by Sandra Moore.

On day 1 a brisk SW'ly met the sailors as they ventured out towards Seapoint. It was looking a lot like a tough day on the bay. Before Race 1 got underway the breeze had moderated a little but the course was still being raked by strong gusts. Choosing which side of the bay to aim for was going to be crucial.

The fleet was very eager to get away and there were two general recalls before PRO Con Murphy unleashed the fleet and let them at it. The inner loop trapezoid course is very popular with the Laser sailors as it provides a good W/L course complete with 2 and a quarter beats alongside a sprinkling of blast reaches thrown in for good measure.

In race 1 Nick Walsh laid down a marker to take the bullet and begin his quest to reclaim the title he lost to Roger O'Gorman in Ballyholme 2015. Nick wasn't having it all his own way and it was a hard fought race with big wind pressure changes and shifts. 'Head out of the boat' was the order of the day. Second was Dan O'Connell and Paul Keane opened his account with a 3rd.

In race 2, David Hillmyer visiting from Sarasota Sailing Squadron in Florida showed great mental reserve to hold his lead to the finish from the marauding pack who were chasing him down after the breeze shut off. Sean Craig scored a handy 2nd while Daragh Sheridan bagged the last podium place. Front runners Dan O'Connell and Nick Walsh had a 6th and 7th respectively.

Race 3 (part #1) was going all the way of Ross O'Leary and Shirley Gilmore in a radial who were launched on the paying side of a huge shift before Con, cruelly perhaps but demonstrating why he is so respected as a PRO, abandoned the race to reset the course. The wind had other ideas and disappeared completely so Con weighed anchor to head into the bay in search of some new pressure. Summer turned into an Autumn gale as a strong line squall found the fleet. When the squall abated Con was able to reset a course and the fleet was quickly off again.

Race 3 (part #2) went to Nick Walsh to put him in the overnight lead. Dan O'Connell was 2nd and Robert Howe began to find his form with a third. Points wise it was very close at the top and a good indicator of things to come.

Saturdays Master Class dinner in the National YC was a perfectly tempered meal. Tired sailors caught up over a delicious meal provided by Louise and her A-Team of helpers.

Sunday morning dawned bright and sunny with a mysterious, light, but very raceable westerly breeze in place of the pessimistic soft forecast. The breeze held nicely for the first race though it was hard going keeping the concentration on the beats and torturous body positions downwind.

Sean Craig revels in the light air and the more twisted the turns in conditions the better. In Race 4 he stamped his mark, and his larger intentions, on the fleet with a convincing win. With Dan again in 2nd and Nick bagging a 3rd the leaderboard was getting tighter and tighter at the top.

Race 5 went to Rob Howe who was on a bit of a charge as he tried to negate a heavy DNF from Saturdays racing. Ross O'Leary popped up in 2nd and Nick posted a 3rd against Dan's 11th.

After race 5 the wind abrubtly but simply shut off! Con, with his usual instinct for detection of the slightest zephyr, upped sticks and set off into the bay in search of breeze. He really should play the lottery as a perfect sea breeze duly arrived as if by magic from 155deg.

His very experienced mark laying team led by Dave Morley were quick to take advantage of the cards they had been dealt and set up a course in record time. And so Race 6 was quickly underway in a sunny glamour 12-14kts, perfect champagne sailing (with a little lightning and thunder across the bay) for the fleets last hurrah.

At the first mark it was neck and neck between O'Connell, Craig, Rice and Keane who all rounded in unison. It was Keane who got a lucky break and the inside berth on the downwind to lead at the bottom. He held the lead for the remainder of the race and despite a strong challenge by O'Connell on the finish line took the bullet. Rob Howe finished in 3rd with Craig in 5th and Nick back in 6th.

As the sailors headed towards the harbour the conversation on the water turned to maths. Incredibly Nick and Dan were tied for 1st on 14 points and 3rd place was a tie three ways between Sean Craig, Rob Howe and Paul Keane on 19. The top slot in the radial too was a tie between Paul Ebrill and Shirley Gilmore.

Ron applied the various countbacks as dictated by the SI's and the leaderboard took on it's final shape. Nick Walsh is again Masters Champion and Paul Ebrill Champion in the radials. The complete and official results can be viewed below

Published in Laser

Solo sailor Finn Lynch (20), returned home from the Laser World Championships in Mexico last night to the National Yacht Club and a hero's welcome. The Dun Laoghaire clubhouse was packed to cheer the ground breaking achievemements that saw the U21 Laser world champion claim the single Rio berth ahead of London 2012's James Espey of Belfast. Lynch, originally from Carlow, is a member of The National Yacht Club and is the youngest ever Irish helmsman to qualify for the Olympics. Read more on his qualification victory here

View the photo gallery below by Joe Fallon:

 
Published in Olympic

Laser sailor Finn Lynch will be given a hero's welcome when he arrives back to the National Yacht Club (NYC) this evening. The Dun Laoghaire club gave its full support to the teen's campaign that ended with Olympic nomination success on Wednesday.

Lynch secured his selection over boat qualifier James Espey (the London 2012 representative) and fellow trialist Fionn Lyden on the final day of the Laser Worlds in Mexico. Lynch was the only sailor to make gold fleet.

David O'Brien in the Irish Times this morning noted the fledgling campaign was only kept afloat by club fundraisers, spearheaded by NYC doyen Carmel Winkelmann. A point also noted on Lynch's Facebook page (below).

Tonight, the NYC is getting ready to hear Finn's story first hand when it toasts both Lynch and his clubmate Annalise Murphy who will both be flyng the NYC ensign in Rio in August.

Lynch will become Ireland's youngest ever Olympic helmsman at age 20, eclipsing Malahide Finn sailor David Burrows who sailed in Sydney 200 aged 22 and Malaide club mate Robert Dix who sailed in Kingston in 1976 aged 23.

Rising star Lynch has had a meteoric rise to his this weeks Olympic place.

Finn Lynch's Road to Rio

2008 Selected for ISA Topper Squad (age 12)
2009 Topper World Championship Silver Medal
2011 Selected ISA Academy
2012 ISAF Youth World Championships Silver Medal
2012 u17 Radial European Champion
2013 u21 Radial World Champion
2013 Radial World Championship Bronze Medal
2014 u19 Laser World Champion
2015 u21 Laser World Championships 4th
2016 Wins Irish nomination trials for Rio Olympics

Published in Olympic
Page 10 of 26

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

mgm sidebutton
bjmarine sidebutton
xyachts sidebutton

Featured Associations

ISA sidebutton
ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Events

tokyo sidebutton
sovscup sidebutton
vdlr sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
viking sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
sellingboat sidebutton

Please show your support for Afloat by donating