Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: RORC

The Royal Ocean Racing Club’s (RORC) De Guingand Bowl Race started in light conditions, with the wind speed increasing later in the race to about 15 knots and veering south.

The top three boats overall were all racing in IRC Four. The overall winner was Jonathan Rolls’ classic S&S Swan 38 Xara.

Second overall was Chris Choules Sigma 38 With Alacrity. French JPK 10.10 Gioia, sailed by Etienne Pinteaux, was third.

In IRC Zero, David Collins Botin IRC 52 Tala took Line Honours for the race. 

Jonathan Rolls’ classic S&S Swan 38 Xara © Paul WyethJonathan Rolls’ classic S&S Swan 38 Xara © Paul Wyeth

“It was a funny old race, and I am sure the crew are very pleased, I think we are a bit lucky really,” commented Xara’s Jonathan Rolls. “We didn’t do anything particularly special to be honest. It was good fun, we are a bit knackered, but it seems that the conditions really suited Xara. I suspect we surprised one or two of the better boats. We are old fashioned amateurs, very definitely not professional, The crew are all family and friends, Tom (Rolls) is the navigator, and very good at it.”

Xara has a long history in the Fastnet Race, including surviving the tragic 1979 edition. In recent years, under the ownership of Jonathan Rolls, Xara has achieved the distinction of achieving Best Swan Overall in the 2017 and 2019 Rolex Fastnet Race.

“We intend to race with the RORC to St. Malo this July, and then the Fastnet this August. I am an ancient gentleman, but the crew look after the old man. For this race, I think that luck played its part, giving us fair winds and following seas.”

A light north easterly breeze freshened as the fleet passed PortsmouthA light north easterly breeze freshened as the fleet passed Portsmouth Photo: Paul Wyeth

The 114nm race started off the Squadron Line to the east on a favourable tide. A light north easterly breeze freshened as the fleet passed Portsmouth. Teams eased sails as they bore away south into the English Channel, where a cross-tide came into the strategy. Once past a virtual line of latitude, the RORC fleet hardened up for a 30 mile beat to Shoreham Outfall. A downwind leg back towards the Solent, following the setting sun, was followed by a manoeuvre-testing chicane, before finishing in the Solent at Mother Bank.

Full Results here

IRC ONE
Ed Fishwick’s GP42 Redshift took line honours and the class win from Rob Bottomley’s Mat 12 Sailplane. David Cummins’ Ker 39 Rumbleflurg, sailed by Harry Bradley, was just 77 seconds behind Sailplane after IRC time correction.

IRC TWO
Ross Applebey’s Oyster 48 Scarlet Oyster was the class winner by just over three minutes after IRC time correction. The current overall leader for the RORC Season’s Points Championship, Thomas Kneen’s JPK 1180 Sunrise, was second in class. Ed Bell’s JPK 1180 Dawn Treader was third in class for the race. Capstan Sailing’s Skylander, skippered by Yuri Fadeev, won the battle of the First 40s, and placed fourth in class.

IRC THREE
James Harayda’s Sun Fast 3300 Gentoo, racing Two-Handed with Dee Caffari, was the class winner. Second was the full crew of the Army Sailing Association, racing Sun Fast 3600 Fujitsu British Soldier and skippered by Henry Foster. Rob Craigie’s Sun Fast 3600 Bellino, racing Two-Handed with Deb Fish, was third.

IRC TWO-HANDED
20 teams entered racing in IRC Two-Handed, the majority racing in IRC Three and Four. Richard Palmer’s JPK 10.10 Jangada chalked up another narrow victory. Sailing with Jeremy Waitt, Jangada beat Gentoo by 83 seconds after IRC time correction. Bellino was third. All three of these teams have now completed three races in the RORC Season’s Points Championship, with less than 19 points separating them.

Published in RORC

The Royal Ocean Racing Club Season’s Points Championship continues with the De Guingand Bowl Race, which will start on Saturday June 26th from the RYS Line, Cowes. The course will be 110-160 nautical miles around marks with a finish in the Solent or adjacent waters. 75 boats have entered the sixth race of the RORC Season’s Points Championship, racing under IRC and Class40 Rules.

Favourites for Line Honours include David Collins Botin IRC 52 Tala, VME Racing’s CM60 Venomous, skippered by James Gair, and Ed Fishwick’s GP42 Redshift. Class40s in action include Marc Lepesqueux’s Sensation, sailed by Eric Bredeka with and all French team and Greg Leonard’s all-American Kite, which will be crewed by the Leonard family.

Ed Fishwick’s GP42 Redshift © Rick Tomlinson/RORCEd Fishwick’s GP42 Redshift © Rick Tomlinson/RORC

IRC ONE

Redshift is the scratch boat in a 12-strong class. Mark Emerson’s A13 Phosphorus II will be defending their class win in 2019. Proven race winners in IRC One include: Andrew Hall’s Lombard 46 Pata Negra, Rob Bottomley’s Mat 12 Sailplane, and David Cummins’ Ker 39 Rumbleflurg as well as Michael O’Donnell’s J/121 Darkwood which leads IRC One for the 2021 RORC Season’s Points Championship.

Mark Emerson’s A13 Phosphorus II © Paul Wyeth/RORCMark Emerson’s A13 Phosphorus II © Paul Wyeth/RORC

Ross Applebey’s Oyster 48 Scarlet Oyster © Paul Wyeth/RORCRoss Applebey’s Oyster 48 Scarlet Oyster © Paul Wyeth/RORC

IRC TWO

14 are entered, including a number of teams from yacht charter companies. Ross Applebey’s Oyster 48 Scarlet Oyster, overall winner of the De Guingand Bowl Race in 2019, will be racing. Six Beneteau First 40s will be in action including Ronan Banim’s Galahad Of Cowes, Capstan Sailing’s Skylander and three entries from Hamble based race training school, Sailing Logic: Lancelot II, Merlin and Arthur. Thomas Kneen’s JPK 1180 Sunrise is the overall leader for the 2021 RORC Season’s Points Championship and will continue their duel with Ed Bell’s JPK 1180 Dawn Treader.

Sailing Logic's First 40 Arthur © Paul Wyeth/RORCSailing Logic's First 40 Arthur © Paul Wyeth/RORC

IRC THREE

23 teams are expected to be racing in IRC Three, including many teams racing Two-Handed. Fully crewed entries include Trevor Middleton’s Sun Fast 3600 Black Sheep, skippered by Jake Carter. Six J/109s will be racing fully crewed, including the current leading J/109 for the season, Kevin Armstrong’s Jazzy Jellyfish. Rob Craigie’s Sun Fast 3600 Bellino, racing with Deb Fish, was the class winner for the race in 2019.

Trevor Middleton’s Sun Fast 3600 Black Sheep © Paul Wyeth/RORCTrevor Middleton’s Sun Fast 3600 Black Sheep © Paul Wyeth/RORC

Nigel Goodhew’s Sun Fast 3200 Cora © Rick Tomlinson/RORCNigel Goodhew’s Sun Fast 3200 Cora © Rick Tomlinson/RORC

IRC TWO-HANDED

20 teams are entered racing Two-Handed, the majority racing in IRC Three and Four. The top two teams for the season so far will be in action. James Harayda’s Sun Fast 3300 Gentoo, racing with Dee Caffari, and Rob Craigie’s Bellino. IRC Four season leader, Nigel Goodhew’s Sun Fast 3200 Cora will be racing with Mark Heuchan. Cora won IRC Four for the De Guingand Bowl in 2019. The current runner-up in IRC Four, William McGough & Christian Jeffery, will be racing J/109 Just So. Class winner for the Morgan Cup, Richard Palmer’s JPK 10.10 Jangada, will be in the action racing with Jeremy Waitt.

Jonathan Rolls’ Swan 38 Xara © Paul Wyeth/RORC

IRC FOUR CLASSICS

22 teams are entered in IRC Four, including a number of classic yachts: Mike Greville’s Bowman 44 Skadi, Giovanni Mazzocchi’s Swan 44 Ithaka, Stephen Brookson’s Swan 411 Kiswala, Jonathan Rolls’ Swan 38 Xara, and Stuart Greenfield’s S&S 34 Morning After. Three Contessa 32s will have their own private battle. Rob Windsor & Stephen Davies racing Colemere, Roger Shapland & Mark Himsworth racing ATV and Christophe Declercq racing Lecas.
Yachts taking part in the De Guingand Bowl Race will start to gather off Cowes Parade from around 0700 on Saturday 26th June. The full entry list and AIS tracking link can be found at https://yb.tl/dgbr2021 and also via smartphones with the YB App. Results will be available with live updates at www.rorc.org

Published in RORC
Tagged under

Time and tide wait for no man - with the faint zephyrs of wind failing to stabilise, there was no racing on the final day of the Royal Ocean Racing Club UK IRC National Championship. The IRC Class leaders after six races remain unchanged.

IRC 1
Niklas Zennstrom's FAST40+ Rán won IRC One by a single point from Peter Morton's GP42 Jean Genie. Hamilton & Gillon's GP42 Khumbu was third, just a point behind Jean Genie. Ed Fishwick's GP42 Redshift finished the regatta in fourth. Rán retains the class win from 2020, and this is the fourth occasion that Rán Racing has won at the RORC IRC National Championship.

Niklas Zennström’s FAST40+ Rán Photo: Paul WyethNiklas Zennström’s FAST40+ Rán Photo: Paul Wyeth

IRC 2
Stuart Sawyer's J/122 Black Dog was the winner ahead of Rob Bottomley's Mat 12 Sailplane. Russell Peters' Cape 31 Squirt finished the regatta in third place for the class. The 16-strong class was very competitive with six boats scoring race-podium finishes including, Michael Blair's King 40 Cobra, Mills 39 Zero II sailed by James Gair, and Lance Adams' Cape 31 Katabatic.

Adam Gosling JPK 1080 Yes! with RORC Commodore, James Neville. Photo: Paul WyethAdam Gosling JPK 1080 Yes! with RORC Commodore, James Neville. Photo: Paul Wyeth

IRC 3
Adam Gosling's JPK 1080 Yes! scored four race wins to become the IRC National Champion for IRC Three. Gosling has won class at the IRC Championship a record five times. Howell & Newell's A35 Arcus, reigning IRC Overall National Champion, was class runner up this year. McNamara & Lowe's First 40.7 Incognito was third in class. John Cooper's J/112E Jooped missed the podium by just half a point! The 12-strong class saw seven boats score race-podium finishes including, John Allen's X 302 Antix, Bruce Huber's J/112E Xanaboo, and Toby Gorman's Sigma 33 Stan The Boat.

Detailed Results here

Racing with the Royal Ocean Racing Club continues offshore with the RORC Season's Points Championship. The De Guingand Bowl Race is scheduled to start on Saturday 26th June from the RYS Line in Cowes.

Published in RORC
Tagged under

The Royal Ocean Racing Club’s IRC National Championship is underway in the Solent. Two windward-leeward races, followed by a reaching start for a two-hour round the cans finale, gave the RORC fleet a variety of racing. A fresh northerly breeze of 15-20 knots, with pulses of rain showers, produced difficult conditions. Crew work, tactics and strategy were all in the mix for a top performance. The IRC Class leaders after three races: Niklas Zennström’s FAST40+ Rán, Stuart Sawyer’s J/121 Black Dog, and Adam Gosling’s JPK 1080 Yes!

Detailed Results here 

IRC ONE

Niklas Zennström’s FAST40+ Rán scored a 1-2-1 today to lead the high performance IRC Class. Peter Morton’s GP42 Jean Genie won Race 2 to finish the day in second place but only on countback. Hamilton & Gillon’s GP42 Khumbu is tied on points with Jean Genie, only missing out win in Race One, by 24 seconds after IRC time correction. “Khumbu is going really well after some upgrades, we were very close to winning the first race but Ran hit the ‘turbo button’ to stay ahead.” Commented Khumbu’s Guy Gillon.

RORC Commodore James Neville is racing his HH42 Ino XXX in IRC One, their main focus this year is the Rolex Fastnet Race. However, racing at the IRC National Championship is very much part of the programme. “Inshore and offshore racing are very different disciplines but racing against the top inshore boats in the Solent really sharpens up our performance, and that fine tuning of our boat trim and sail handling works very well offshore.”

Stuart Sawyer’s J/122 Black Dog, overall winner in 2019 © Paul Wyeth/RORCStuart Sawyer’s J/122 Black Dog, overall winner in 2019 © Paul Wyeth/RORC

IRC TWO

Stuart Sawyer’s J/121 Black Dog came out fighting hard for the opening day of the championship, scoring straight bullets to take a five point lead from Rob Bottomley’s Mills 41 Sailplane. Mills 39 Zero II, skippered by James Gair is lying third in class. Blair & Beckett’s King 40 Cobra came close to spoiling Black Dog’s perfect score, just 14 seconds behind in Race Three after time correction.

Adam Gosling’s JPK 1080 Yes! © Paul Wyeth/RORCAdam Gosling’s JPK 1080 Yes! © Paul Wyeth/RORC

IRC THREE

Adam Gosling’s JPK 1080 Yes! scored a hat trick of wins today to lead the class. However, it was far from an easy day for Yes!, each race was won by about a minute after IRC time correction. Bruce Huber’s J/112E Xanaboo is second, three points ahead of McNamara & Lowe’s First 40.7 Incognito. 

Racing at the Royal Ocean Racing Club’s IRC National Championship continues Saturday 19th June. 

Published in RORC
Tagged under

The first edition of the RORC IRC National Championship was held in 1999 and for over 20 years a huge variety of yachts have enjoyed success winning the right to be named national champions.

For the 2021 regatta, over 40 teams will be competing for three days of thrilling racing in the Solent. Up to eight races will be fiercely contested with the fleet split into three IRC Classes.

The overall winner will be awarded the RORC IRC National Championship Trophy and together with IRC Class winners, they will celebrate at the RORC Clubhouse in Cowes.

Niklas Zennström’s FAST40+ RánNiklas Zennström’s FAST40+ Rán

IRC One

Niklas Zennström’s FAST40+ Rán, will be defending their class win in 2020, Zennström’s team also won the class with TP52 Rán in 2008 and 2009. Peter Morton will be racing his GP42 Jean Genie. Morton has helmed three boats to class victory of the years: IC45 Yes (2001), Half Tonner Swuzzlebubble (2014) and FAST40+ Girls on Film (2019). IRC One will also feature the first encounter between two IC37s in the Solent with Ian Atkins’ Icy and Bertie Bicket’s Fargo going toe-to-toe.

Stuart Sawyer’s J/122 Black Dog, overall winner in 2019 Photo: Paul WyethStuart Sawyer’s J/122 Black Dog, overall winner in 2019 Photo: Paul Wyeth

IRC Two

Five Cape31s are expected for the IRC Championship, the first time that the Mark Mills designed pocket rockets have been racing at the event. Stuart Sawyer’s J/122 Black Dog, overall winner in 2019, will be racing with his West Country team. A past winner under new ownership is the Mills 39 Zero II, skippered by James Gair.

IRC Three

The 2020 overall IRC National Champion is back to defend the title. Howell and Newell’s A35 Arcus posted a perfect scoreline to win the championship. Adam Gosling’s JPK 1080 Yes! is the scratch boat for the class. Statistically, Gosling is the most successful skipper in the history of the event, having won class four times in various boats, all called Yes! (2009, 2011, 2016, 2017). In 2016, Adam Gosling’s Yes! had the unusual distinction of a tie for the overall win with Dunkerque - Les Dunes de Flandre. Giovanni Belgrano’s one-off classic Whooper will also be racing this year, hoping to emulate their overall win in 2017.

Giovanni Belgrano’s one-off classic Whooper Photo: Paul WyethGiovanni Belgrano’s one-off classic Whooper Photo: Paul Wyeth

Published in RORC
Tagged under

One hundred and twenty five boats started the 230 nautical-mile RORC Myth of Malham, held over the Bank Holiday Weekend. High pressure at the start of the race, delivered light to moderate conditions with brilliant sunshine for a magnificent spinnaker run down the South Coast of England. On the morning of Day Two, as the majority of the fleet were rounding the Eddystone Lighthouse, the wind speed increased to over 20 knots from the northeast. A feisty beat in confused seas lasted for about seven hours. The wind faltered later in the race creating calm seas, which combined with a strong unfavourable tide, to slow the progress of the smaller boats.

David Collins’ Botin IRC 52 Tala. Photo: Paul WyethDavid Collins’ Botin IRC 52 Tala. Photo: Paul Wyeth

David Collins’ Botin IRC52 Tala took Line Honours and the Myth of Malham Cup for the best corrected time under IRC. Congratulations to all of the class winners including Orange Mecanix2 skippered by Maxime de Mareuil, Gilles Fournier & Corinne Migraine’s Pintia, Louis-Marie Dussere’s Raging-bee², Tim Goodhew & Kelvin Matthews racing Cora, James Harayda & Dee Caffari racing Gentoo, Charles Emmett’s Virgin Media Business, and James Holder’s Slinky Malinki.

Full Results

“It’s been a long time and great to be back, the last distance race I did was the Fastnet 2019,” commented Tala’s navigator Campbell Field. “Thankfully the South Coast turned on some beautiful weather with a little bit of bash and crash on the way back to the finish. Tala is not putting much emphasis from this result towards the Fastnet in August. If the Myth of Malham had been run seven days earlier, the systems coming through would have created a different story. It was nice to sharpen our act a little, get the team together for some beautiful sailing, and we have found a few things to improve our performance.”

James Harayda’s Sun Fast 3300 Gentoo, racing with Dee Caffari. Photo: Paul Wyeth/RORC   James Harayda’s Sun Fast 3300 Gentoo, racing with Dee Caffari. Photo: Paul Wyeth/RORC  

IRC Two-Handed

Thirty-Eight Two-Handed teams competed in the race, James Harayda’s Sun Fast 3300 Gentoo, racing with Dee Caffari, was the winner of the Ville D’Hyeres Trophy. Kelvin Rawlings’ Sun Fast 3300 Aries, racing with Stuart Childerley, was second. Henry Bomby & Shirley Robertson racing their Sun Fast 3300 were third. The first IRC Two-Handed team to finish the race was Rob Craigie’s Sun Fast 3600 Bellino, racing with Deb Fish. Bellino was fourth after IRC time correction.

Tired but elated, James Harayda and Dee Caffari spoke dockside: “The race was delayed by about 30 minutes because of a ship coming through the Solent, which threw off our plans for the tidal gates. We got a good start and there was a big transition at The Needles but the big boats in front of us gave a good indication of what was to come.” After tight racing all the way down the South Coast, there was little separating the leaders. “It was literally a traffic jam as we rounded the Eddystone Lighthouse. We made sure we got our manoeuvres right and then the fun really started. After a wonderful ride downwind, we had a really messy sea state and 20 knots of wind as we beat back. Approaching Portland, we stayed offshore a little, hoping for more breeze which worked. It is never over until you cross the finish line, anything can happen, and at the end of a long race you can get tired and make a mistake, we had to race-clever all the way to the end.”

IRC One

The French xP44 Orange Mecanix2 skippered by Maxime de Mareuil, has won the Loujaine Cup. Orange Mecanix2 pulled off a tremendous finish to win IRC One from Michael O'Donnell’s J/121 Darkwood. Andrew Hall’s Lombard 46 Pata Negra made a big gain going into Lyme Bay on the return leg, finishing third after IRC time correction. Class Line Honours went to Ed Fishwick’s Farr 42 Redshift, after a close battle with RORC Commodore James Neville racing HH42 Ino XXX.

Gilles Fournier & Corinne Migraine’s French J/133 Pintia. Photo: Paul Wyeth/RORC   Gilles Fournier & Corinne Migraine’s French J/133 Pintia. Photo: Paul Wyeth/RORC  

IRC Two

Gilles Fournier & Corinne Migraine’s French J/133 Pintia won the class winning the Jamarella Trophy and placed second overall for the fleet. Thomas Kneen’s JPK 1180 Sunrise took Class Line Honours, was second in IRC Two, and third overall. Christopher Daniel’s J/122E Juno was third in class. IRC Two produced the most competitive contest for the podium with less than 20 minutes separating the Pintia, Sunrise and Juno, after 36 hours of racing.

“We are very pleased to race the Myth of Malham, our first race since Cherbourg in 2019,” commented Pintia’s Gilles Fournier. “We were very eager to come to England in spite of the pandemic. Even with all the safety measures in place, we received a good welcome in Cowes. For the race, we had friendly and well-sailed competitors, and Pintia is delighted to have won our class. On the way back, Portland Bill was tough with a lot of tide, and we were overtaken by our competitors, but we got back, which was so nice. Thank you to the RORC for a great race!”

IRC Three

French boats filled the class podium with Louis-Marie Dussere’s JPK 1180 Raging-bee² winning the taking Class Line Honours and the win after IRC time correction from the legendary Noel Racine racing his new JPK 1030 Foggy Dew. Maxime Mesnil’s J/99 Axe Sail, taking part in their debut race, was third by just 19 seconds. Raging-bee² wins the Maid of Malham Cup.

IRC Four

Tim Goodhew & Kelvin Matthews won a tight finish racing Two-Handed on Sun Fast 3200 Cora to win the Ernest Moore Plate. Emmanuel Pinteaux’s fully crewed French JPK 10.10 Gioia was second. The Two-Handed team of William McGough & Christian Jeffery, racing J/109 Just So was third, only three minutes behind after time correction. 

Myth of Malham Trophies and Medallions will be presented on Saturday 11th September at the RORC Cowes Clubhouse at 1930 hrs. All skippers and crews are most welcome.

The Royal Ocean Racing Club 2021 Season’s Points Championship continues with the East Coast Race, starting on Saturday 5th June. The race starting and finishing in Harwich, will pitch the RORC fleet in the North Sea on a course of approximately 125nm.

Published in RORC
Tagged under

The Royal Ocean Racing Club offshore programme is in full race mode this weekend with 127 boats expected on the Royal Yacht Squadron Line for the 230nm race around the Eddystone Lighthouse. The Myth of Malham Race is always an important event in a Rolex Fastnet Race Year, as it mirrors the start of the world-famous yacht race that will start from Cowes in August. Even more, importance is attached to the Myth of Malham Race for 2021.

Among the Irish sailors competing is Greystones, County Wicklow yachtswoman Pamela Lee on board Gilles Fournier and Corinne Migraine's J133, Pintia.

This will be the largest RORC fleet to set sail since the start of the pandemic. The forecast fair weather will make for an impressive spinnaker start off Cowes Parade.

Conditions at the start of the race may suit teams racing light displacement boats, especially those that can clear the tidal gate at Portland Bill. Among the favourites for Monohull Line Honours in IRC Zero are David Collins' Botin IRC52 Tala and CM60 Venomous skippered by James Gair. In IRC One the fastest boats will also challenge to be the first to finish, especially RORC Commodore James Neville's HH42 Ino XXX and Ed Fishwick's Farr 42 Redshift. James Holder's Dazcat 1295 Slinky Malinki is currently the only team racing for Multihull Line Honours. For overall victory under IRC for the Myth of Malham Trophy and victory in the six IRC Classes, the form book is wide open, especially as the wind is forecast to increase in speed for the slower boats.

Yachts taking part in the RORC Myth of Malham Race will start to gather off Cowes Parade from around midday on Saturday 29th May. The full entry list and AIS tracking link can be found here.

Additional reporting by the Afloat team

Published in RORC
Tagged under

The Royal Ocean Racing Club’s Vice Admiral’s Cup came to a conclusion on Sunday 23rd May after two days of racing in fresh to feisty conditions in the Solent. The final day of racing produced more challenging conditions for the high performance classes racing under IRC and One-design Class Rules. A gentle south-westerly wind with clear skies was soon replaced by a significant rain squall with over 20 knots of breeze, gusting over 25 on occasions.

Congratulations to the eight class winners: Niklas Zennström’s Rán, Rob Bottomley’s Sailplane 3, Glyn Locke’s Toucan, Sam Laidlaw’s BLT, Tony Mack’s McFly, David Richards’ Jumping Jellyfish, Russell Peters’ Squirt and Stephen Procter’s Xcellent.

FAST40+ Class

Niklas Zennström’s Rán won four out of six races to dominate the FAST40+ Class. Christian Hamilton & Guy Gillon’s Fast40+ Khumbu was second, just a point ahead of Peter Morton’s Jean Genie.

“Winning the first round of the FAST40+ circuit was our aim towards our goal of winning the season,” confirmed Rán’s Tim Powell. “We have a number of youth sailors, both female and male and it was especially pleasing today to have well-executed crew work in difficult conditions. The FAST40+ Class is very much about boats that are built to withstand heavy weather, but perfecting those manoeuvres is so important towards the performance. I think the competition in the fleet is getting closer. Khumbu has most definitely found another gear and the twin rudder set up on Ino XXX makes the team very quick at certain angles. Morty’s Jean Genie has had a number of modifications and I am sure after some fine tuning the boat will be very hard to beat.”

Performance 40 Class

Rob Bottomley’s Mills 42 Sailplane 3 continued their impressive form winning the Performance 40 Class with a race to spare. Michael Blair & Stevie Beckett’s King 40 Cobra finished off a highly consistent performance by winning the last race of the regatta to take second place for the class. David Cummins’ Ker 39 Rumbleflurg completed the podium just a point ahead of VME Racing’s Mills 39 Zero II.

“Sailplane is very much a team effort and we are delighted with our first win of the season against good opposition in the Performance 40 Class. I have to single out Nick Jones who has done an outstanding job in putting the programme together,” commented Sailplane’s Rob Bottomley. “Our next race will be the Myth of Malham and we have created a boat which is a good all-rounder for inshore and offshore racing. The two disciplines do help each other and we hope to put in a good start to the offshore race, buoyed by the confidence from this win in the Vice Admiral’s Cup.”

A lively day on the water for the Quarter Tonners, with Sam Laidlaw’s BLT winning the class © Rick TomlinsonA lively day on the water for the Quarter Tonners, with Sam Laidlaw’s BLT winning the class © Rick Tomlinson

Quarter Tonner Class

Sam Laidlaw’s BLT won the last race of the regatta to win the class. Held in over 20 knots of wind, the last race was full-on for the Quarter Tonners. Olivia Dowling’s Catch finished the regatta in second place with Julian Metherell’s Bullit third.

Sam Laidlaw was quick to mention that the biggest factor in BLT’s win was teamwork. “We have been racing together for about 10 years,” said Sam. “When you race these quirky boats in big breeze it requires a lot of know-how and understanding and when you get it right it is very thrilling! The Quarter Ton Class has a lot of well sailed boats that excel in different types of conditions so you really have to be at the top of your game. Many thanks to the RORC Race Team for providing great racing, especially on the first day. The fast race sequence allowed us to get four races in, which should be applauded.”

HP30 Class

Glyn Locke’s Farr 280 Toucan was the winner of the HP30 Class, retaining the title won in 2019. Toucan was pushed to the maximum by Jerry Hill & Richard Faulkner’s Farr 280 Moral Compass which finished the regatta just a point behind their rivals. Jonathan Powell’s Farr 280 Peggy scored a third place in the final race to claim third, just a point ahead of Jamie Rankin’s Farr 280 Pandemonium

Glyn Locke races Toucan with his two sons, Alex who drives and Anthony who trims upwind and downwind. The Locke family hails from Yarmouth IOW, giving a home victory to the team: “It was pretty full-on, fast and furious and we had a few scary moments and it was very, very wet!” commented Alex. “It’s an absolute blast,” smiled Glyn Locke. “The chit-chat and banter from the whole crew is so much fun.”

J/111 Class

In the J/111 Class, Tony Mack’s McFly held off a strong challenge to win the J/111 Class. Chris Jones & Louise Makin’s Journeymaker II won the last race to finish the regatta in second place ahead of Cornel Riklin’s Jitterbug.

J/109 Class

David Richards’ Jumping Jellyfish won the J/109 Class scoring three race wins including a full-blooded final race battle with Christopher Burleigh’s Jybe Talkin'. Mike Yates’ Jago was third.

J/109 winners: David Richards’ Jumping Jellyfish © Rick TomlinsonJ/109 winners: David Richards’ Jumping Jellyfish © Rick Tomlinson

Cape31 Class

Russell Peters’ Squirt has stamped their authority on the newly formed Cape 31 UK Class, winning five straight races to clinch the class win - the first round of the Cape 31 circuit. Lance Adams’ Katabatic was runner-up for the class and Simon Perry’s Jiraffe had a great final day at the Vice Admiral’s Cup, winning the last race to take third place for the class.

SB20 Class

Conditions were right on the edge for the SB20 Class with Stephen Procter’s Xcellent scoring their fourth win of the regatta to take the title by a handsome margin. Tom Neilson’s team was second, and an impressive final race for Lizzie Farrington’s Boomerang lifted the team to third, just one point ahead of Richard McAdam’s Breaking Bod.

Stephen Procter’s SB20 Class Xcellent scored their fourth win of the regatta to take the title by a handsome margin © Rick TomlinsonStephen Procter’s SB20 Class Xcellent

Racing with the Royal Ocean Racing Club continues next weekend with the 230nm offshore Myth of Malham Race. The first major offshore race of the year mirrors the start of the Rolex Fastnet Race. Well over one hundred boats are expected, which will be an impressive sight, starting from the Royal Yacht Squadron Line on Saturday 29th May.

Full results here

Published in RORC
Tagged under

Racing got underway at the Royal Ocean Racing Club’s Vice Admiral’s Cup on Saturday 22nd May with four highly competitive races for all eight classes. The gale that had blown through the Solent the previous day had passed, but there was a moody sky as the 55-strong fleet headed out to the combat zone. A gentle breeze from the southwest, oscillated during the day providing shifty conditions. The wind speed varied under a pewter sky with glimpses of sunshine breaking through.

Over 20 knots blasted in from the Western Solent for the final race of the day to create a thrilling, full-on foam up finale.

Quarter Tonner Class
Sam Laidlaw’s BLT leads the class having claimed two race wins today. Olivia Dowling’s Catch won the last two races to finish the day in second place. Julian Metherell’s Bullit is third. Stories resonate throughout the fleet, but one that really tells the tale behind the return to racing after lockdown, is from the Quarter Tonner Class.

Olivia Dowling’s Catch is a beautifully prepared yacht, but due to family commitments, she has not had the time to sail her for a while. Racing in the highly competitive fleet, Olivia was especially keen to get the better of her husband Niall Dowling (Royal Irish Yacht Club), racing Per Elisa in the same class.

Niall commented after racing: “I made the mistake of tacking on Olivia in the first race and that obviously got her going, because it was the last time we got anywhere near her for the rest of the day! I have to say a big ‘thank you’ to the RORC Race Team that produced a really professional performance in difficult conditions. 

Cork Harbour sailmaker Tom McWilliam (black hat, centre) on board Niklas Zennstrom's Rán. One point separates the top three in the FAST40+ fleet, with Rán holding onto top place after one day of racing Photo: Rick TomlinsonCork Harbour sailmaker Tom McWilliam (black hat, centre) on board Niklas Zennstrom's Rán. One point separates the top three in the FAST40+ fleet, with Rán holding onto top place after one day of racing Photo: Rick Tomlinson

FAST40+ Class
Niklas Zennström’s Rán won two of today’s races to finish the day top of the leaderboard. Peter Morton’s Jean Genie is in second place, no doubt enjoying his first race victory in his new boat, beating Rán by just over a minute in Race 3. Christian Hamilton & Guy Gillon’s Fast40+ Khumbu got off to a great start, taking line honours and the corrected time win in Race 1. Khumbu finished the day in third place, just two points ahead of Ino XXX, with RORC Commodore James Neville at the helm.

Performance 40 Class
Rob Bottomley’s Mills 42 Sailplane 3 had a spectacular day, scoring three bullets to top the class after four races. Michael Blair & Stevie Beckett’s King 40 Cobra is second having scored all podium finishes. David Cummins’ Ker 39 Rumbleflurg is third having scored a win in Race 2 by just nine seconds after IRC time correction. Andrew McIrvine’s Ker 39 La Réponse is just a point off the podium.

J/111 Class
Tony Mack's McFly leads the class by just one point from Cornel Riklin's Jitterbug with both boats scoring a pair of wins each. Chris Jones & Louise Makin’s Journeymaker II had a very consistent day to finish the day in third place.“We knew where we wanted to go on the racecourse and getting a good start in a one design fleet meant we didn’t have a bigger boat taking our lane,” explained Jitterbug’s Ritchie Hinde-Smith. Full credit to the race team for laying excellent windward-leeward courses which gave us all thrilling racing where you had to be at the top of your game. This is our fourth outing as a team this year and it all clicked together, plus our new North 1.5 headsail was really fast straight out of the bag.”

J/109 Class
David Richards’ Jumping Jellyfish leads the J/109 class after four races, finishing the day in style by winning the final two races. Christopher Burleigh’s Jybe Talkin' scored a second place in the final race to move up to second for the class. Mike Yates’ Jago was scoring well but had to retire before the start of the final race with a minor crew injury. Jago is third on countback from Mojo Risin' skippered by Rob Cotterill.

Cape31 Class
Russell Peters’ Squirt had a perfect start to the Cape 31 UK season winning all of today’s races. Lance Adams’ Katabatic came within 20 seconds of winning Race 2 and finished the day in second place. Simon Perry’s Jiraffe is third on countback from Tor McLaren’s Gallivanter III.

HP30 Class
Glyn Locke’s Toucan opened their defence of their Vice Admiral’s Cup title with three straight bullets. In the final race, a real ripper, with the HP30s planing at terrific speed. Jerry Hill & Richard Faulkner’s Farr 280 Moral Compass took the win to finish the day in second place. Three boats are within a point of each other for third. Jamie Rankin’s Farr 280 Pandemonium scored a third in the final race to place just a point ahead in the series from Lucian Stone’s Fareast 28 Vendetta and Jonathan Powell’s Farr 280 Peggy.

SB20 Class
The SB20 Class was an awesome sight today, especially in the final race, scorching downwind in a ball of spray. Stephen Procter’s Xcellent scored three race wins, but a seventh place in Race 3 means that Xcellent only leads the class on countback from Tom Neilson’s team. Richard McAdam’s Breaking Bod is third.

After racing, a dinner was held at the Royal Ocean Racing Club’s Cowes Clubhouse with social distanced dining for over 70 competitors, members and guests. The RORC Vice Admiral’s Cup will conclude on Sunday 23rd May.

Published in RORC
Tagged under

British sailing team Alex Thomson Racing will begin their 2021 competitive season with the Fastnet Race on August 8th.

Three months out from the start of the prestigious race, the team this week returned their IMOCA 60 yacht, HUGO BOSS, to the water, with training set to commence in the coming days.

As regular Afloat readers will know, Thomson, a pre-race favourite in the Vendee Globe, quit the round the world race last November due to rudder damage.

"The boat has had a full inspection, NDT and service, and two new rudders installed" said Skipper Thomson. "Restrictions here in the UK due to the pandemic have meant that we've worked at a steady pace to keep our team safe. Now, with the work complete and restrictions set to ease, we're looking forward to getting back out there to train again".

The 695 nautical mile Fastnet Race will begin on Sunday 8th August from Cowes, UK with a record 450+ boats - across multiple classes - set to compete. The fleet will sail via the Fastnet Rock off southwest Ireland and will finish, for the first time in the race's 96-year history, in Cherbourg, France.

Sailing onboard HUGO BOSS, Thomson - joined for the double-handed race by a co-skipper yet to be decided by his team - will aim to better his previous second-place finish in the race: "This will be my 11th Fastnet, I believe, so we've got a lot of experience in this race. I'm really looking forward to sailing the new course and finishing in Cherbourg. I think it adds a new tactical dimension to the race".

Published in Fastnet
Tagged under
Page 2 of 43

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating