Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: RS200

#RS SAILING - UK RS Association chairman Pete Vincent will be running another RS200 and 400 demo day from the Royal St George Yacht Club on the weekend of 24-25 March.

The well-known expert on RS boats is being brought to Dublin by RS400 owners Richard Tate and Emmet Ryan, who are "really keen to get an RS fleet up and running" in Dun Laoghaire.

"After the huge attention our boats have drawn both ashore and on the water, we feel there is already a keen interest from a broad cross section of sailors to learn something more about these incredible hiking dinghies," says Tate.

"There is a ready-to-race format for both RS200s and 400s to have a full season of racing every Tuesday and Thursday in Dublin Bay right from the go."

The RS200 is described as a "natural progression" from the RS Feva, while the RS400 "takes the concept one step further and way beyond". Both classes provide high performance assymmetrical racing for all age groups.

If you are thinking about moving into an RS200 or 400, this is the perfect opportunity to help you make your decision.

All demo sails must be booked in advance by contacting Pete Vincent directly at +44 7812 899 043 or [email protected]

Published in RS Sailing
This Saturday's inaugural RS400 & RS200 Sprint Trophy hosted by the Royal St George Yacht Club, sees the regular contenders face off in this season's finale against some formidable additions to these growing classes.

In the RS200 class National Champions Roy Van Maanen and Glen Reid will come into the event as favourites. However, the entry of the husband and wife team of Sean and Heather Craig of the Royal St George is sure to mix up the class status quo.

Heather Craig has already scored a very impressive 2nd at this year's RS200 Nationals, which were held at Cushendall. Sean Craig is sure to apply all of the asymmetric spinnaker skills, which he has honed in the Sb3 class to full affect on home waters.

The unassuming young Greystones pairing of Sean Cleary and Steven Tyner are the dark horses of RS200 fleet. They have been gradually climbing the ranks of the class since they made the transition up from RS Feva. They have already applied what they have learned in the Fevas at this years Nationals in Cushendall taking 3rd place overall.

In the RS 400 fleet, a strong contingent from the Royal North of Ireland Yacht Club is expected to put up a challenge to the dominance of the Greystones based National Champion Simon Herriott. The Royal North pairing of Michael McAllister and Michael Patton are sure to feature, after finishing 2nd at the Nationals. Michael McAllister is on winning form. He was part of Peter Kennedy's team, which won last weekends Sb3 Midland Championships.

Liam Donnelly and Andrew Vaughan have plenty of experience onboard and will relish the prospect of the breezy forecast.

There are also some new faces making their debut the 400 class. Wayfarer national champion Trevor Fisher has teamed up with the very capable Selina Dicker. This team could prove to be a potent combination. Selina has a wealth of asymmetric experience from her time on the UK Laser 5000 circuit.

Bernard Fitzpatrick of the Royal Cork Yacht will also make his RS400 debut. Bernard was a vital part of Mark Mansfield's 1720 European Championship winning crew and has spent the last four seasons as bowman on the international Melges 32 circuit. He is looking forward to the event as his first chance to race in the RS400.

Making his long awaited return to the RS400 class is Dave Cheyne. Dave is looking forward to combining next years RS Traveller series with his Sb3 class commitments.

Please see these Youtube videos below, which give an idea of what to expect from the RS boats. However the weather featured in the videos is unlikely to be repeated for this weekend. See if you can spot the cameo from our own Dave Cheyne in the RS400 clip.

RS400

RS200

For information on the RS Sprint Trophy e-mail [email protected]

Published in RS Sailing
Tagged under

There has been a call for the Irish Sailing Association (ISA) to take a lead in the big decisions that face youth sailors on what classes to sail to after they leave the ranks of the Optimist, Topper and Feva classes. The call comes from a leading junior organiser who does not wish to be named.

Although youth sailing is buoyant in Ireland it is known there is a 'high attrition rate' among teenagers. The lack of transfer in to senior dinghy classes has been a cause of concern for many clubs around the country.

The comments follow a recently published  article on Afloat.ie promoting the RS 200 dinghy as a progression boat for juniors.

"We need a class that will keep youths engaged. The 420 and 29er are great boats but require higher levels of boathandling, are much more competitive and tend to attract the top sailors"

"While the ISA's Olympic ambitions are great to see, it will fail the sport as a whole if it does not tackle this gaping need, the organiser says.

Read the RS 200 article by Ciara Byrne and the junior organiser's comments here

Published in Youth Sailing

The 2011 RS400 and RS200 Traveller Series draws to a close this weekend with the National Championships taking place at Cushendall Co. Antrim.

Two strong fleets of over 40 boats in total are expected.

In the RS400's Simon Herriott of Greystones SC, who scored some very impressive top ten results in the 86 boat UK Nationals is going to have some notable competition with the recently crowned Irish Fireball National Champions and Cushendall locals Barry McCartin and Conor Kinsella rumoured to be entered.

junior_stacker

 Greystones SC is bringing five 'under 18' boats and more boats for sailors in their late teens /early twenties to Cushendall this weekend. The Club's hard work getting kids into fast doublehanders is bearing fruit.  See more on this initiative here. Photo: Sarah Byrne

Also bolstering the fleet is multiple Laser regional champion Paul McMahon, who also has plenty of asymmetric experience from his time in the SB3 fleet. Along with the Irish contingent some of the hotly contested UK fleet may make the trip across.

In the RS200 fleet the season long battle between Greystones rivals Roy Van Maanen and Graeme Noonan is set to continue. But the Wicklow 200's may not have it all there own way, with Clive Coffey and Emily Smith sure to be contention.

Published in RS Sailing
Tagged under

Questions over the next step for juniors after the RS Feva point to the bigger RS200 writes Feva sailor Ciara Byrne

The RSFeva has become the world's best selling two-person dinghy in recent years with fleets also growing in clubs all over Ireland. It is fast becoming the most popular and widespread choice for teenagers and youth sailors who enjoy competitive, active and exciting sailing.

However many questions were being asked recently at the RSFeva Nationals, held in Crosshaven, Co. Cork, regarding the next step for young, talented sailors who wish to continue racing in large fleets without the difficult transition of transferring from the Feva into a larger, unfamiliar dinghy. This uncertainty has led to many sailors dropping out of sailing altogether, while the remainder have split the fleet into Lasers, the 420/470 or moved on to cruisers.

However these dinghies require a lot of time and effort of getting used to, leaving some sailors frustrated and also, less motivated. To avoid this altogether, there is one simple solution: the RS200.

The RS200 is a spacious, one-design, double-handed, hiking, high-performance dinghy which has developed a huge following at club, circuit and championship level in the UK with a growing fleet in Ireland. A pivoting centreboard and rudder allow easy launch and recovery with a thwart giving the crew a comfortable position for light winds. With the asymmetric spinnaker, similar rigging and a similar design, it can be considered as a larger and faster Feva which makes for an easy changeover and the most logical and simple step up.

The ideal weight for an RS200 is 115-145kg (18-23 stone) which allows people of all ages to sail and race effectively in this dinghy. Ideal for teenagers emerging from the Feva, parents, youths, couples, friends and relatives can also come together which enhances the family and social scene.

Even though the 420 has a larger total sail area, the RS200's asymmetric spinnaker of over eight square metres, with a smoother single line hoist and drop system, similar to the Feva's. makes for a faster boat and requires greater tactical and more exciting downwind sailing. This encourages competitive racing and enhanced racing skills.

RS200greystones

An RS200 at full speed off Greystones. Photo: Fiachra Etchingham

A maintenance free hull, made of lightweight polyester GRP ensures a long competitive life and second hand boats can be in very good condition so that older hulls are without the disadvantage experienced in fleets such as the 420. Furthermore, every hull comes from the same manufacturer giving no subtle advantage to any one boat; therefore racing just comes down to the sailors' tactics, boat handling and general knowledge of sailing and racing.

While the RS200 is not an Olympic class, there are large UK and Irish fleets which are active and competitive. Johnathan Lewis, a UK Feva coach and RS200 sailor, strongly encourages Feva graduates to move into the RS200 as it is an easy transition and makes for fun and exciting sailing. RS200 fleets are strong in Irish clubs such as those in Northern Ireland including Ballyholme, Newcastle and Cushendall as well as Greystones Sailing Club in Co. Wicklow.

Greystones Sailing Club boasts probably the largest asymmetric dinghy fleet in Ireland with fifty five asymmetric dinghies, twenty one of those being RSFevas and the majority of the remainder being RS200s. Recognising the RS200 as the natural progression from the Feva, ages range from fifteen to fifty five across the RS200 and RS400 fleets in the Club, with most of these boats competing in national events in Ireland, and some in the UK and further afield.

RS200heeling

Rounding a mark in the RS200. Photo: Fiachra Etchingham

As fleets build in Dún Laoghaire and Howth yacht clubs, the RS200 is gradually becoming a popular progression from the Feva, and with the RS400 as a follow on boat for larger crews, young sailors can remain involved and spirited in asymmetric racing. The RS200 satisfies a thirst for speed and pace which generates more exciting, competitive and enjoyable sailing for those emerging from Feva fleet.

A Dublin Sailor (who has asked not to be named) has sent us comments on this story:

As one involved in junior and youth sailing at club level, one of the big decisions that faces youths is where to go after junior classes such as Optimists, Toppers, Fevas. Like any other sport, there is a high attrition rate after the age of 14 / 15, especially among girls which is an even greater shame as they can compete on a par with the guys.

We need a class that will keep youths engaged. The 420 & 29er are great boats but require higher levels of boathandling, are much more competitive and tend to attract the top sailors. They also suffer from an inability to match up crews who will stick together - teenagers chop and change all the time and its difficult to race a boat like a 420 / Fireball / 29er wihout a constant crew partnership.

We need a boat/class that:
  1. Enables swapping around of crews without a major impact on the boathandling / teamwork. A sailor's plans for the weekend / event / season are not scuppered because of crewing issues.
  2. Does not need a highly competent crew (e.g. ability to trapeze and fly / gybe a kite etc.) so that sailors can sail with their mates who may not necessarily be top-notch sailors but who can acquit themselves well in a slightly less complex boat.
  3. Has a good mixed social scene which is the most important element of any class, youth or otherwise.
  4. Does not cost the earth in terms of purchase price, is easy on wear & tear on kit (hence replacement & upgrade costs) or does not go soft and become uncompetitive needing a new hull after three to five years etc
  5. Has international competition that is closeby (UK, FR, Bel, Ned etc) for those aspiring to a bit more
  6. Has a motiviated class structure to help grow the class.

The fear is that we are starting out another class that will dilute the current youth class efforts. However I believe that the 420 and 29er will hold their own and continue to attract top sailors with ISAF ambitions.

On the other hand, if we continue to support these we will continue to lose the middle ground (and majority) of young sailors from our sport. Youths are fickle enough and if its too much hassle to deal with all the challenges of getting afloat they just won't bother - sad but true.


The ISA needs to take a lead in this and while its Olympic ambitions are great to see, it will fail the sport as a whole if it does not tackle this gaping need in its portfolio of support.


I believe that the RS200 and R2400 provide the best solution to these challenges. They appear well-built and the manufacturer certainly appears well organised and gets involved.


Looking from outside and without any vested interests (other than the health of junior and youth sailing) the RS's get my vote as a class that can make a radical difference.

Published in RS Sailing
A competitive sailing fleet of twenty-three boats turned out for this year's RS400 and RS200 Southerns hosted by Greystones Sailing Club.

Both competitors and organisers were not very optimistic on Friday evening with an ominous forecast on the Windguru web site of gusts up to a maximum of "5 knots". Thankfully even the Internet can get it wrong sometimes and everyone was pleasantly surprised when they were greeted with a steady 12 to 15 knots Southerly outside Greystones Harbour. The blue sky and sunshine providing the welcome bonus of an early sea-breeze.

With a strong tide which apparently runs South for ten hours of every twelve hour tidal cycle, judging lay-lines both up and down wind on the windward leeward courses was tricky to say the least. Though it was fair to say all crews were happy to have the tidal push for the up wind beats as it was full hiking conditions for all of day's four lap races.

In the 400 fleet Liam Donnelly took race one of the day. Greystones SC Commodore Simon Herriott suffered a breakage in race one but recovered in style to win the next two races.

In the 200 fleet Roy Van Maanen posted a perfect score card winning all three races of the day.

On day two a short postponement was followed by two light air races. Finding some pressure and managing to stay in it was the priority. This led to some dramatic place changes particularly on the down wind legs, were calling a gybe at the correct time was the difference between getting to the bottom mark in first or last place.

The sea-breeze kicked in just in time to provide plenty of excitement for the final race of the series. Amongst the 400 fleet there were four boats with the potential to take the event going into the last race. In the end Liam Donnelly and his crew, Andrew Vaughan from the Royal North prevailed in the stronger breeze taking the 400 Southerns trophy North.

In the 200's Roy Van Maanen had the luxury of discarding a 2nd to win the event comfortably. The battle for second was a little tighter with Graeme Noonan taking second place on count back from Sean Clery.

RS400 Results:

1st Liam Donnelly

2nd Simon Herriott

3rd Michael McAllister

RS200 Results:

1st Roy Van Maanen

2nd Graeme Noonan

3rd Sean Clery

Next up for the Irish RS fleet is Newcastle Co.Down. Check out www.irishrs.com for more information or to arrange test sail in an RS200 or RS400.

Published in Racing
Page 5 of 5

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating