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#portofcork – The Port of Cork today outlined plans for Phase 1 of the Bantry Inner Harbour Development which the Port of Cork will undertake on behalf of its subsidiary company, Bantry Bay Port Company.

The scheme marks the start of the regenerating of the inner harbour and is in keeping with the total Inner Harbour Development scheme which was developed by the Bantry Bay Harbour Commissioners in 2012 and planning permission was granted in 2013.

Now being advanced by the Bantry Bay Port Company, the scheme will provide a more sheltered harbour environment and marina with increased water depth and improved pier facilities which will promote fishing and tourism activities in the Bantry area.

Phase 1, which is likely to cost €8.5m, will consist of the following principal elements:
· 20 berth Marina (quayside pontoons)

· Dredging to a depth of 4 metres to allow vessels access to the inner harbour

· Remedial works to Town Pier (widening and extending)

· 4,000m2 of reclaimed landscaped amenity area

· Construction of 60m long floating breakwater pontoon

· Beach nourishment at Cove site

Commenting on the development, Brendan Keating, Chief Executive of the Port of Cork said that there are many benefits for Bantry and the wider Harbour area in undertaking such a project. "Works to the Town Pier will ensure improved longevity of the existing pier structure and improved access and facilities on the pier will facilitate existing activities and hopefully generate more commercial activity for Bantry Harbour. There will be improved berthage available for larger marine vessels and the Company would hope that this will lead to an upturn in marine leisure in and around Bantry Harbour" he said.

It is expected that construction will commence on the project in Q4 2015 and will be complete in Q1 2017. The work will be phased in order to minimise impacts to pier operations and to minimise traffic and amenity impacts for the town.

Bantry Bay is the largest of the long marine inlets in south-west Ireland. It is approximately 35 km long, running in a south-west to north-easterly direction. The entrance to the bay is approximately 10 km wide, steadily narrowing to 3-4 km at its head. Bere Island, situated on the north shore adjacent to CastletownBere, and Whiddy Island lying near the head of the bay on the southern shore are the two largest islands in the bay.

Published in Port of Cork
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#whitehavemarina – Whitehaven Marina in Cumbria, operated by specialist consultancy Marina Projects, has announced an increase in annual berthing numbers for 2015.  "Spring is in the air" which is traditionally the time of year when the majority of boat owners renew their annual berthing contracts. Whitehaven Marina are happy to report that their policy of continual investment in the marina and delivering consistent, professional yet friendly customer service has been recognised by an increase in berthing demand.

One of the few UK marinas last year to invest in additional berths, Whitehaven is delighted that demand is increasing too. Tony Taylor, the Marina Supervisor comments "berth holders are coming from all points of the compass but in particular from the Lakes, the East Coast around Newcastle and even as far as North Wales. It would appear that people are looking for new and exciting cruising grounds and Whitehaven is a great place for that. Last year we had 20 visiting boats from Ireland. Whitehaven is also a great spot to stop off before hopping over to the Isle of Man too"

In 2014 140 new berths were constructed in the West Stand basin. These berths have been popular with annual berth holders and visitors alike, and have proven to be particularly useful for events such as the Whitehaven Festival and Three Peaks Race.

The facilities and services at Whitehaven Marina have been dramatically enhanced in the last six years since Marina Projects Ltd took over the management. The Marina is now considered to be one of the best in the region and this is backed up by the healthy berthing numbers.

"Customer service is very important to our offer" comments Simon Morgan, Marina Manager for Whitehaven Marina. "We do endeavour to "go the extra mile" as we fully understand that our customers have the choice of other berthing locations. We appreciate our customers time in the Marina is precious leisure time so everything has to be safe, clean and well organised with a friendly smiling face!"

These are some of the many reasons why in the last completed customer satisfaction survey 99% of customers said they would recommend Whitehaven Marina to a friend!

Whitehaven Marina has links with Bangor Marina in Northern Ireland and Malahide Marina near Dublin through the TransEurope Marina Scheme.

For general enquiries about berthing in the Marina please contact [email protected]

Published in Irish Marinas
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#visitderry – Sail Ireland's North West and discover Donegal's rugged coastline and the River Foyle to the walled city of Derry~Londonderry, named by 'Lonely Planet' as one of the Top 10 Cities to visit in the World!

Follow the seaways from Scotland, England and Wales and, with good planning, the tidal streams will make light work of the passage across the North Channel and westward to the Foyle. Lying in wait is the fantastic coastline of Inishowen, with vistas of towering stacks, cliffs, beaches and a repertoire of heritage!

Sailing along the top of Ireland, take advantage of the sheltered delights of Lough Foyle and, at its mouth, the quaint village of Greencastle, the second-biggest fishing port in Donegal.

The harbour accommodates a wide range of yachts and a new permanent pontoon is planned for 2015. Trawlers from here ply as far as Rockall and the local mussel and oyster harvests supply restaurants across the region. Greencastle itself is home to a superb seafood eatery and its traditional Irish pubs are perfect places to relax and enjoy the 'craic' in this friendly village.

Visitors can also avail of a stunning shoreside walk and check out the Inishowen Maritime Museum – housed in the Coastguard buildings overlooking the harbour. Lough Foyle is shallow but a well-marked shipping channel runs all the way from Greencastle to Derry~ Londonderry's Foyle Marina, where two pontoons can berth up to 120 boats.

Named by acclaimed travel publication 'Lonely Planet' as a Top 10 City in the World, Derry is renowned as one of the finest walled cities in Europe and the defences celebrated their 400th anniversary in 2013 during Derry's iconic year as the inaugural UK City of Culture.

Take a trip back in time strolling along the famous 17th Century walls, and view one of the largest collections of original cannon in Europe, dating back to the days of the Siege. Or why not call in to one of the many museums and immerse yourself in the city's quirky history?

A hard day shopping and sightseeing is guaranteed to work up an appetite and whether you're looking for contemporary cuisine, a fine dining experience or somewhere to re-fuel the kids, you'll find it all here.

So where to next? Derry is home to a thriving music scene and the city is packed with lively bars, stylish clubs and traditional pubs.

Join the locals in an Irish trad 'seisiun' or catch a gig at one of Derry's cutting-edge music venues. Or why not check out one of the city's many events? Visit Derry recommends the City of Derry Jazz from April 30 to May 1 (cityofderryjazzfestival.com), and Flavours of the Foyle Seafood Festival (25-26 July).

Just minutes from Derry lies the stunning landscape of Donegal. Take a drive around its rugged coastline and marvel at endless beaches, medieval castles and natural wildlife. Challenge yourself and try your hand at angling, cycling, hiking or surfing. And let's not forget some of Ireland's finest links courses!

To the east of the city you will find the stunning natural hinterland of the North Antrim Coast. Explore the Giant's Causeway, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and take an 'Indiana Jones' style walk across the famous Carrick-A-Rede rope bridge, which is suspended over 100ft between two rugged cliffs – an experience that is definitely not for the faint hearted!

To finish your day, call into Bushmills Distillery for a drop of Northern Ireland's most famous exports, Bushmills whiskey.

On the doorstep of such stunning scenery, Derry~ Londonderry has to be one of Europe's greatest city experiences. With berthing fees from just £15 per night there really is no better time to visit. Make your next sail the North West of Ireland – it'll be 'LegenDerry'!

'The North West is among the most beautiful cruising grounds in the world'

During the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race, the Derry~Londonderry stop–over was the best; not just from my slightly biased point of view, but also one shared by most of the crew on the other boats. The reception after the scenic trip up the Foyle into such a vibrant and friendly city is what made it so special.  The facilities in the new Foyle Marina and also nearby in Greencastle, Co Donegal are fantastic. It's great to see the development going into the port as it and the surrounding areas in the North West of Ireland are among the most beautiful cruising grounds in the world... especially when the sun shines!

Derry~Londonderry skipper Sean McCarter

DATE FOR YOUR DIARY!

The Clipper Round the World Yacht Race and Maritime Festival returns to the city – in Summer 2016!

Now firmly established as the No 1 stop–over destination on the Clipper Race circuit, Derry will host a week-long Maritime Festival to celebrate the arrival of this iconic race. Foyle Marina will transform into a summer promenade, complete with race village, marine marquees, award winning continental market and host of sea-faring activities on and off shore. At the centre of the festival will be the welcome of the 12-strong fleet of Clipper yachts, including Derry~Londonderry-Doire yacht. In 2014, the city welcomed more than 120 visiting yachts during the festival – make sure you are part of the celebrations next year!

Book your berth now!

Contact FOYLE Port
+44 (0) 28 7186 0555

www.foyleport.com 

www.visitderry.com

 

Published in Cruising

#foreshore – The Irish Marine Federation (IMF) has given a cautious welcome to much heralded changes to the foreshore bill that is designed to streamline the development consent process.

The government has published its Legislation Programme for Spring/Summer 2015 and the Maritime Area and Foreshore (Amendment) Bill is among a list of key Bills of interest which currently before the Houses of the Oireachtas.

The Bill will streamline the development consent process for the foreshore, including the integration of certain parts of the foreshore consent process (under the Foreshore Act 1933) with the existing on-land planning system.

The IMF, the national federation of the marine leisure industry in Ireland, has long held out that the failure to manage Ireland's natural resources "in a consistent or coherent manner" has led to serious setbacks in the support of marine tourism on the island.

The IMF has long argued the State must develop a clear and simplified pathway for the licensing of offshore and foreshore activity - in marina development, aquaculture, and energy exploitation. Currently, there is no timeframe for the granting of permissions leaving many developers facing a lifetime of unneccesary bureaucractic hurdles that stymies development, according to one marina developer.

In 2002, there was an attempt to address this when the Marine Institute published 'A Development Strategy for Marine Leisure Infrastructure'. Shortly afterwards, however, the responsibility for marine tourism research was transferred from the institute to the then Department of Arts, Sport and Tourism. It would appear that during this move, a disagreement over how this new responsibility for marine infrastructure was to be resourced led to its not being resourced at all.

In 2007, the Marine Institute followed up with another report - the Marine Tourism and Leisure Development Strategy 2007-2013 - which valued the water-based tourism and leisure sector at €630m and anticipated it would grow to €1bn by 2013.

That report identified a failure to manage Ireland's natural resources "in a consistent or coherent manner" in support of marine tourism. That report, and and its recommendations, was left to gather dust alongside its 2002 predecessor.

So it is something that the Government's new marine plan, 'Harvesting our Ocean Wealth' aims to develop a national maritime spatial plan, and recognises the need to engage with experts and stakeholders. But it is imperative that government does not overlook the various barriers and pressures that exist in our various sea areas.

Above all, the key to unlocking Ireland's marine potential, according to the Irish Marine Federation is to complete the necklace of marinas around our coast - marinas which can provide a lifeline for struggling coastal communities with the sort of jobs that cannot be shipped abroad.

Ireland has a chronically underdeveloped marina system. The single marina in La Rochelle, France, for example, has the same capacity as our entire island. There are more berths in North Wales alone than there are in all of Ireland.

Marinas create small hubs of marine enterprise, supplying services to cater for the boat owners gathered there or just visiting, and bringing massive spin-off benefits for the neighbouring coastal communities. Studies show that for every €10 spent by a yachtsman in a marina, €100 is spent in the local town in shops, pubs and restaurants.

A visiting overseas boat leaves €132 per night. A visiting Irish boat leaves considerably more at over €300 per night. The average spend of a boat owner in a marina berth is in excess of €8,000 per annum. Most of this stays in the local community. One full time job is supported by every 3.7 marina berths according to Federation reports.

Published in Marine Federation

#marinas – Edinburgh Marina - the 400 berth marina, residential, retail and spa hotel development that will be the focal point of Granton Harbour's regeneration, is set to be at the forefront of Scottish Marine Tourism's strategic growth, as announced by the British Marine Federation Scotland (BMFS).

The new strategy, announced last week by BMF Scotland at a Glasgow event chaired by MSP Stuart McMillan, aims to grow the total value of Scottish marine tourism by 25%, from £360m to £450m, by 2020.

Just 2.5 miles from Edinburgh City Centre, Edinburgh Marina will accommodate in excess of 320 moorings for boats of all types and sizes.

Kevin Fawcett of Granton Central Developments Limited said: "This is excellent news for Scotland and Edinburgh Marina's key location will make it a vital part of BMFS' strategy – it is in pole position to help grow Scottish Marine Tourism. Edinburgh Marina will be a world-class destination for boating enthusiasts from all over the world. The marina is long overdue for Scotland's capital city – especially a city with such rich marine heritage."

The marina facilities have been designed to put Edinburgh firmly on the charts as a marine destination, whilst creating over 700 new jobs and injecting a £30m boost to the local economy each year - over half of which is projected to come from marine related tourism.

The Edinburgh Marina master plan includes local shopping and leisure facilities, a best of Scotland indoor produce market and a hotel, restaurant & health spa - all essential ingredients in successfully growing Scottish marine tourism in line with the strategy announced by BMF Scotland.

Edinburgh Marina: Fact Box

Spa Hotel: 123 beds

Residential: 1,881 units

Retail: 9220 square metres

Leisure: 4220 square metres

Commercial: 5000 square metres

Marina: 400 berths

Distance from Edinburgh City Centre: 2.5 miles

Developer: Granton Central Developments Limited

Architect: Wilson Gunn Architects, Glasgow

Planning Consultant: Paton Planning & Development

Marine Consultant: MDL Marinas

Website: edinburgh-marina.co.uk

Published in Irish Marinas
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#royalcork – Royal Cork Yacht Club has retained its Five Gold Anchor Marina award as well as an ICOMIA (International Council of Marine Industry Associations) Clean Marina Award.

The Royal Cork became the first Yacht Club in Ireland to be awarded this prestigious title in 2011 and further to a recent inspection, the Club has again retained this status. Ratings range from one to five gold anchors and for the Royal Cork to attain the maximum number of anchors again is a fantastic achievement by all of the Club staff involved.

Preparations for a busy summer of visiting yachts from all corners of the globe and organisation for some of Ireland's most prestigious sailing events are well under way. Gavin Deane, General Manager commented "This year is gearing up to be a busy one for the Club and retaining our Five Gold Anchors was a fantastic way to start 2015. Through our involvement in the Gold Anchor scheme we hope to see an increase in our visitor numbers again this year which is great news for the Club and also for the local economy. In addition to hosting a number of high profile events this year, we hope to expand on our training offering for both children and adults. Last year the Club was awarded the Irish Sailing Association 'Training Centre of the Year' and we have witnessed a significant increase in numbers coming to try sailing for the first time"

Mark Ring, Racing & Marina Co-ordinator at the Royal Cork, who has qualified as a Certified Marina Manager since our last inspection commented "We are delighted to retain the coveted TYHA Five Gold Anchor Award in 2015. This award is very much a team effort and everyone's input is necessary both in preparing for inspection day and maintaining the five Gold Anchor standard, while upholding that essential customer service ethos. There is an enormous sense of pride amongst all of the staff that our members and visitors will receive excellent service and high standards at the Royal Cork Yacht Club under the THYA Five Gold Anchor scheme."

The Gold Anchor award scheme is a voluntary assessment programme focused on customer service and providing Quality Assured Berthing for any boat owner. The scheme is designed for the marina consumer by The Yacht Harbour Association with contribution from the RYA. With 26 years' experience of Gold Anchor standards, this is a point of reference for all boat owners to make an informed decision on where to berth.

Published in Irish Marinas

#greystoneshm –  Expansion plans for extra berths have been accelerated at Wicklow's newest marina at Greystones Harbour.The harbour facility that opened during Easter 2103 (see above vid) is now thriving with full capacity – and above – reached a number of times during the 2015 season. Additional berthing is proposed for 2015 and Afloat.ie understands this maybe up to fifty extra berths.

The Greystyones facility is the latest marina to be added to a necklace of marina facilities around the coast.

Bernard Gallagher of Greystones Marina cites the 'massive visitor numbers' at the deep water marina and its fine dining and entertainment options locally, only a Dart ride from Dublin city centre, as major factors in its initial success.

Published in Greystones Harbour
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#arklowberths –In a further boost for marine lesiure and the necklace of Irish marinas around the coast, the 'Garden County' has announced 20 new berths for Arklow Harbour. It's a bid, says Arklow Harbourmaster Paul Ivory, 'to generate tourism and providing additional berthing facilities for the Arklow area'.

Ivory expects the new facility, built by Irish firm Inland and Coastal, to open before the end of the year.

It's another berthing option that follows on the successful opening of the 200–berth Greystones Harbour Marina in April 2013.

Commissioning work is still taking place in Arklow (see pontoon layout above) and rates have yet to be calculated by Wicklow County Council, who now operate Arklow Harbour. 

The Marina is located in the Dock at Arklow, which has been recently dredged to an average depth of 3.0m Chart Datum, acccording to Ivory.

The new pontoons have the following berth capacity; 4 x 10m vessels on 7.5m long berths and 16 x 12m vessels on 9m long berths.

Further details are as follows:

General:
− Wheelchair accessible gangway
− Rolec service pedestals for 16amp electricity supply with smart card metering
− Fresh water taps at each pedestal
− Safety ladders and lifebuoys fitted
− Security gate at gangway
− No toilet, shower or laundry services available yet
− Price of berths to be published soon

Technical:

− Built by Inland & Coastal Marina Systems Ltd.

− Walkway units with mooring cleats, 500mm freeboard
− Berth spacings are as per Pianc (The World association for Waterborne Transport Infrastructure) guidelines
− Hardwood timber fenders
− Glassfibre Reinforced Concrete (GRC) decking
− Floatation provided by GRC encased expanded polystyrene floats, minimum GRC skin thickness 10mm

Published in Irish Marinas
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#corkharbour – Cove Sailing Club will finally have a home in Cork Harbour and Cobh town will get a marina, according to Commodore of Cove Sailing Club Adrian Tyler on Friday.

The new Cork Harbour marina facility adds another important link in the necklace of up to 60 marinas around the Irish coastline.

Tyler made the announcement following a meeting of Cove Sailing Club members it was unanimously passed to go ahead with a 74 berth marina at Whitepoint, Cobh.

The new facility will be built in two phases. The first phase is for thirty berths and this is expected to be operational by early in 2015.

Rear Commodore Derry Allister said that the works will begin immediately. The funding for this 'community marina' is made up of SECAD funding of €125,000 a grant from Cork County Council of €200,000 and club members have sponsored the remaining €300,000 for the project.

President of Cobh & Harbour Chamber Brian Curtis said this marina was a welcome boost to tourism in Cobh this news on the back of Cobh retaining its silver medal position in the tidy towns competition ends a great week for Cobh and gives all the community a boost for next year's tourist season.

Brian Curtis stated that the marina will allow more tourists to visit Cobh and they will at last have a marina to tie their boats up. Without the assistance of our four newly elected councillors working together at Cork County hall with the marina committee this great news would not be possible today.

The marina group also acknowledged the assistance of Mr Louis Duffy of Cork county council in guiding them through the storms of financing the marina.

CSC will be holding a meeting for potential berth holders shortly.

Published in Irish Marinas
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#dunmoreeast – The Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Simon Coveney TD, today announced details of a €4m dredging project at Dunmore East Fishery Harbour Centre on the occasion of the official opening of a €450,000 renovation of the Marine Leisure Area at the western end of the harbour.
At the opening, the Minister said "I am delighted to officially open this. The completion of this project adds greatly to the Harbour for marine activities generally. This end of the Harbour was in need of revamping for some time, and I prioritised works to make it a fit for purpose amenity which will benefit and promote the marine leisure industry in this area".
Leisure activity in Dunmore East has been increasing substantially in recent years with 180 visiting yachts from all over Ireland and abroad using the harbour in 2013, more than a threefold increase on previous years. Cruise line passengers nearly doubled in 2013 to 9,500 and with the newly renovated slipway it is expected that usage by members of the public will double in 2014 from around 600 in 2013.
The €450,000 renovation included extending the existing slipway, widening it from five to twelve metres, resurfacing and generally improving vehicle and pedestrian access, the development of a promenade with street lighting, improved access to the beach, and a rock armour embankment to protect the development from severe weather conditions.

Commenting on the works the Minister said "This is an excellent piece of infrastructure and is now a top class amenity which will lend itself to the further development of the leisure industry in Dunmore East, and the spin off that will have for tourism and jobs locally".
Announcing the €4m dredging project for Dunmore East to resolve the impacts of years of siltation in the harbour, which has restricted vessel traffic and made manoeuvrability and fish landings problematic for fishermen the Minister said "This significant investment in Dunmore East from the 2014 Fishery Harbour Capital Programme is an indication of this Government's commitment to the fishing industry in the South East. When complete, not only will the harbour be more accessible to larger vessels, landing times and management will be much improved as will the usability of the syncrolift".
Latest figures indicate that the value and volume of fish landings in Dunmore East has been on the increase for a number of years. Between 2010 and 2013 landings increased by 40% from 8,387 tonnes to an estimated 11,718 tonnes. The equivalent value of these landings went from €13.7m in 2010 to an estimated €17.5m in 2013 an increase of 28%.
The Minister went on to say "Taking account of the increased level of fish landings I am conscious of the need to dovetail the much needed dredging works with the seasonal work patterns of the fishing industry to cause as little disruption as possible. With that in mind every effort will be made to ensure that the works will be completed in advance of the important herring fishery later in the year".
Groundwork for the project is well advanced; a public procurement exercise will be initiated in May, with a view to awarding the contract in time for an August commencement date.

Concluding the Minister said "The development and upkeep of Dunmore East as a state of the art Fishery Harbour Centre, supporting a broad range of marine related activities is and will remain an ongoing process. These two major projects and the recent installation of floating pontoons within the Harbour are part of a long term strategy to deliver on the potential of Dunmore East for job creation for the fishing industry and as a marine leisure and tourist destination".

Published in Coastal Notes
Page 5 of 12

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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