Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: marine warning

#MARINE WARNING - Two recent Marine Notices from the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport (DTTAS) highlight the safety recommendations made in reports by the Marine Casualty Investigation Board (MCIB) earlier this year into separate small vessel accidents, one of which resulted in the death of two fishermen.

Marine Notice No 39 of 2012 details recommendations from the report into the Lady Linda tragedy off the coast of Skerries in North Dublin in April last year, which cost the lives of 26-year-old Ronan Browne and 41-year-old David Gilsenan.

In its investigation, the MCIB noted a number of contributary factors to the incident, such as weather conditions and wave height, the absence of lifejackets and the inaccessibility of emergency equipment.

The DTTAS is urging all fishermen to check weather conditions before any voyage and ensure that their vessel can cope with them safety. It also reiterates the legal obligation for fishermen to wear suitable personal flotation devices while on deck, and that the carriage of an EPIRB distress becaon is mandatory for all fishing vessels.

Meanwhile, Marine Notice No 40 of 2012 concerns the carriage of livestock aboard small vessels, after an incident on the MV Claire Buoyant off Beginish Island in Co Kerry in August a year ago that led to a cargo of 21 sheep being jettisoned overboard.

The MCIB report reminded that any vessel carrying livestock must be appropriately certified due to the dangers involved in transporting live cargo. It also recommended that such vessels develop a regular maintenance regime to check all fittings that are open to the sea, and to ensure that bilge pumps are free from blockage.

Published in Marine Warning

#MARINE WARNING - A small craft weather warning is in effect today as strong easterly winds bring heavy rains sweeping across Ireland.

Met Éireann reports that strong gales between force 5 and 6 are developing this morning on all coasts and on the Irish Sea, with northerly gales set to develop on western and southern coasts this afternoon, and speeds in most places expected to reach force 8 or 9.

Winds may even reach storm force 10 between Roche's Point and Slyne Head by the end of the day.

In addition, Irish Coast Guard manager Declan Geoghegan told the Press Association that local flooding is likely throughout the country - especially in Connacht, which may experience up to 60mm of rainfall - and warned the public not to attempt crossing fast-running rivers or fords.

“The combination of tides, forecasted high winds in the coming days and swollen rivers may result in very dangerous conditions," he said.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Marine Warning

#FULLMOON – Hazards that result in drowning are often the last thought in the minds of people relaxing over a Bank Holiday weekend however Irish Water Safety is anxious that the public avoid situations that can quickly turn to tragedy such as stranding when walking shorelines. IWS is also calling for people to use Lifeguarded waterways this Bank Holiday weekend.

Monday's full moon will bring higher and lower tides resulting in deeper waters at high tide and more exposed shoreline at low tide. Walkers should therefore enjoy with caution coastal walks and avoid being stranded by incoming tides.

Irish Water Safety trained Lifeguards, employed by Local Authorities, will begin patrolling our waterways this weekend to protect the public from dangers such as rip currents and strong surf. Directions to all lifeguarded bathing places are available at http://www.iws.ie/bathing-areas-page.html  Having Irish Water Safety Lifeguards nearby is reassuring in case you need advice, help with first aid or missing children. They are trained to prevent or react to unexpected incidents where seconds can make a difference. However, Lifeguards are not a babysitting service and members of the public have a duty of care to protect themselves and their families when visiting waterways nationwide.

Published in Marine Warning
Tagged under

#MARINE WARNING - As wind farm projects expand around the coasts of the UK and Ireland, the Royal Yachting Association (RYA) has raised concerns about an unexpected hazard for boaters navigating near such installations.

Taking the London Array and Kentish Flats wind farm areas in South East England as a case study, the RYA explains how rock placements, or rock berms, have been put in place to protect the power cables from these arrays at the points where they cross in shallow water.

The RYA warns that as cable crossing become more likely and more frequent, as offshore energy projects expand around the coastline, the potential for accidents is greatly increased.

"It is this cable protection that in shallow waters can reduce underwater clearance and therefore pose a risk to navigational safety," said the RYA.

Referring to the London Array and Kentish Flats specifically, the association said it "was not aware that the cables would have rock protection until we received a notice.

"It would seem that the Marine Management Organisation, Trinity House and the Maritime and Coastguard Agency were also unaware that the developers were placing a rock berm in [the[ area and are investigating how all this happened 'sight unseen' - particularly as it seemed that the original London Array Limited applications had stated that the cables would be trenched."

The RYA has more on the story HERE.

Published in Marine Warning

#MARINE WARNING - The latest Marine Notice from the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport (DTTAS) advises on cable laying operations in the Irish Sea commencing today 22 April.

Following preliminary work on the East-West Interconnector power cable earlier this month, as previously reported on Afloat.ie, cable laying works will be undertaken by AMC Connector (call sign LAKY7) for a duration of approximately 18 days, subject to weather delays.

Operations will involve deployment of cable and ROVs which will restrict the vessel’s ability to manoeuvre.

The vessel will operate on a 24-hour basis, displaying appropriate day shapes and lights during operations, and will transmit an AIS signal. The vessel will be keeping a listening watch on VHF Channel 16 at all times during the operations.

All vessels, particularly those engaged in fishing, are requested to give the AMC Connector a wide berth.

Complete details including co-ordinates of the work area are included in Marine Notice No 20 of 2012, a PDF of which is available to read and download HERE.

Published in Marine Warning

#RESCUE - Four people were rescued on Lough Erne yesterday after their motor cruiser ran aground in the second such incident in a week, the Belfast Telegraph reports.

All on board were retrieved by RNLI lifeboat from the 29ft cruiser, which is believed to have stranded on rocks beyond the marked channel of the lough.

No injuries or damage to the vessel were reported, with a Northern Ireland Coastguard spokesperson describing it as "a routine rescue".

The coastguard blamed low water levels in the lough caused by lack of rainfall in Co Fermanagh.

Waterways Ireland has posted a marine notice warning boat users of the risks posed by "the extended period of unseasonal dry weather" for Ireland's inland waterways.

In a similar incident last Friday, three adults and two children were rescued from a cruiser that stranded in shallow water on the lough.

The Belfast Telegraph has more on the story HERE.

Published in Rescue

#MARINE WARNING - The latest Marine Notice from the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport (DTTAS) advises on preliminary work on the East-West interconnector power cable in the Irish Sea between Ireland and Wales over the next few weeks.

Briggs Marine commenced pre-lay grapnel runs along the line of the cable route on Sunday 1 April, and this work will be carried out over three weeks from the vessel Kingdom of Fife (call sign 2BKR2).

This work will continue on a 24-hour basis, and the vessel will display appropriate day shapes and lights as required, with a continuous watch on VHF Channel 16 and DSC.

Complete details including co-ordinates of the work area are included in Marine Notice No 14 of 2012, a PDF of which is available to read and download HERE.

Published in Marine Warning

Thousands of people will enjoy Easter bank holiday breaks on or close to waterways that pose a danger if safety is not heeded especially as there will be a Full Moon and some of the highest tides of the year. Irish Water Safety is pleading with the public to avoid tragedy by supervising children on holidays and exercising common sense around our shorelines, rivers and lakes.

Children are attracted to water but can drown silently in seconds. It is critical that adults supervise children at all times. Visitors to rural homes should ensure that children do not stray alone to septic tanks, quarries or riverbanks.

Those boating over the holiday weekend will share their enthusiasm with swimmers, divers, anglers, canoeists, surfers and thousands more walking the shoreline. Walkers and shellfish pickers should be aware of the dangers of stranding posed by the spring tides. Those enjoying what is commonly their first boating trip of 2012 should ensure that every person on board wears a correctly fitting well maintained lifejacket with crotch strap.

Cold-water temperatures are close to ten degrees at present. Most swimmers will not yet be acclimatized to such conditions and should not stay too long in open water.

Alcohol is a contributory factor in approximately one-third of all drownings, therefore alcohol should not be consumed before or during aquatic activities.

If you have not used your lifejacket since last year then you will need to carry out the following checks.

Visually Check all lifejackets and buoyancy aids for the following deficiencies:

Ensure CO2 Cartridges have not been punctured

Ensure all zips, buckles, fasteners and webbing straps are functioning correctly

Check that fitted lights are operating correctly

Check that the valve or lifejacket is not leaking by inflating the lifejacket overnight or immersing it in water checking for air bubbles

Discard any faulty lifejackets by destroying them

Always use your crotch strap when fitting your lifejacket

Emergencies

If you see someone in difficulty in the water dial 999 OR 112. Don't assume someone else will make the call.

For water safety information for children www.aquaattack.ie

Published in Marine Warning
Tagged under

#RESCUE - One angler has died in hospital and another was receiving emergency treatment last night after their boat got into difficulty on Lough Corrib.

According to The Irish Times, the two men were among a party of three on a boat that was struck by a wave off Annaghdown, which knocked one of them into the water.

Though he was reportedly wearing a lifejacket before he went overboard, an empty jacket was then spotted floating on the surface. One colleague entered the water to search for him but was unsuccessful.

Responding to the distress call from a nearby angling boat, the Irish Coast Guard's Shannon helicopter located the missing angler soon after arriving on scene, some 50 minutes after he entered the water.

The man was airlifted to University Hospital Galway, with the coastguard chopper returning for his colleague when he showed signs of hypothermia.

A small craft warning from Met Éireann was in effect throughout the area at the time of the incident.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Rescue

#MARINE NOTICE - The latest Marine Notice from the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport (DTTAS) advises on rock placement operations offshore at North Beach in Rush, Co Dublin and in the Irish Sea.

Works commenced on 19 January to continue for around 14 days, subject to weather delays, undertaken by DPFPV Tideway Rollingstone (call sign PHYR) which is operating on a 24-hour basis.

The vessel is transmitting an AIS signal and will be keeping a listening watch on VHF Channel 16 at all times. It is also displaying appropriate day shapes and lights.

The works - which involve the deployment of survey ROV and fall pipe - will restrict the vessel's ability to manoeuvre, so all vessels in the vicinity (particular fishing boats) have been given warning to give the vessel and her equipment a wide berth.

Complete details including co-ordinates of work areas are included in Marine Notice No 4 of 2012, a PDF of which is available to read and download HERE.

Published in Marine Warning
Page 3 of 4

The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating