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Displaying items by tag: warning

#Weather - It's a poor start to the New Year as Met Éireann has issued a Status Yellow warning for small craft.

Southerly gales have developed this morning and will be continuing throughout the day in all coastal waters, with the strongest gusts expected on the Irish Sea.

For anyone who must be at sea today, be careful out there.

Published in Weather
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#WeatherWarning - Cork and Kerry are currently under a Status Red weather warning from Met Éireann as wind speeds rise to as much as 85km/h with gusts threatening to hit an incredible 160km/h by this afternoon (Wednesday 12 February).

Meanwhile an Orange alert has been issued for Wexford, Galway, Mayo, Clare, Limerick and Waterford and for mariners on all coasts, with gusts of up to 130km/h expected in the coming hours as the latest in an unusually persistent succession of storms sweeps in from the Atlantic.

And it seems no part of the country will be spared from the wind assault, with Status Yellow (for winds justing 100 to 110km/h) declared for most other counties.

TheJournal.ie reports that the high winds and seas will be accompanied by rain, sleet and snow, with thundery showers and spot flooding a possibility.

Published in Weather
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#storm – Ireland is bracing itself for a fast aproaching southwest gale or strong gale at first this evening on coasts from Loop Head to Fair Head to Roches Point and on the Irish Sea according to Met Eireann. The state forecaster who has issued a status orange alert says northwest or cyclonic gale to storm force winds expected for a time tonight in the South Irish Sea. The forecast follows a Coastguard warning to the public to be careful on exposed westerly coasts, cliffs, piers, harbour walls, beaches, and promenades.

West to Northwest gales are expected to develop later tonight and tomorrow morning on all sea areas; with winds increasing to strong gale force at times tomorrow afternoon on coasts from Wicklow Head to Loop Head to Fair Head and on the South Irish Sea.

Published in Marine Warning

Marine Notice No. 41 of 2013
Notice to all Shipowners, Fishing Vessel Owners, Agents, Shipmasters, Skippers, Fishermen, Yachtsmen and Seafarers
Air to Ground Live Fire Practices, Danger Area D1,
Gormanston Air Defence Range, Co. Meath.

The Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport has been advised by the Defence Forces that the "Flying Training School", Irish Air Corps, will conduct live Air to Surface firing practices on the following dates:

Ranges active from:

From 9 th September 2013 to 14 th September 2013 inclusive;
From 16 th September 2013 to 21 st September 2013 inclusive;
From 23 rd September 2013 to 27 th September 2013 inclusive.

Time: 08:00 to 17:00 Hours daily.

The danger area comprises the lands of Gormanston Aerodrome and the Air and Sea areas contained within a radius of 3 nautical miles centred on Gormanston Aerodrome with an additional area contained within a segment centred on Gormanston Aerodrome and bearing of 015º degrees true, through Mosney Railway Station and 106º degrees true, through Gormanston Railway Station seawards for a distance of 10 nautical miles.

Surface area to be engaged will be the beach area inside the 'D1' at Gormanston.

For the periods whilst the Range is active the sea zone within the danger area is excluded to all vessels. A Naval Service patrol vessel will enforce the exclusion zone. The exclusion zone 'D1' is indicated on British Admiralty Chart No. 44.

All vessels are advised that they are required to remain outside of the exclusion zone whilst the Range is active. All vessels in the area are recommended to carefully monitor the Radio Navigation Warnings that will be broadcast during the firing period.

Director General,
Irish Maritime Administration,
Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport,
Leeson Lane, Dublin 2, Ireland.

For any technical assistance in relation to this Marine Notice, please contact:
The Marine Survey Office, Leeson Lane, Dublin 2, tel: +353-(0)1-678 3400.
For general enquiries, please contact the Maritime Safety Policy Division, tel: +353-(0)1-678 3418.
Written enquiries concerning Marine Notices should be addressed to:
Maritime Safety Policy Division, Dept. of Transport, Tourism and Sport, Leeson Lane, Dublin 2, Ireland.
email: [email protected] or visit us at: www.dttas.ie
15/08/2013

Published in Marine Warning
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Irish Water Safety has stressed the importance of vigilance and caution to avoid drowning tragedies during our current heat wave. Many people nationwide are enjoying trips to waterways nationwide however further tragedies are always a danger with water temperatures still so low in many bathing places.

Cold water and currents on open water require more energy than swimming in a pool.

Many people are not used to open water swimming at present so they should exercise great care if swimming especially as the water temperature is hovering close to a cool 10 degrees. All activities should include the wearing of a correctly fitting and well maintained lifejacket with crotch strap at all times when on or near water.

Vital water-safety advice...

Ireland is blessed with some of the most beautiful swimming locations in the world. This advice is designed to teach children and adults important water safety messages vital to these open-water environments. The rules of water safety may seem familiar, however people often take them for granted and risk their lives if not adhered to:

-      Wear a Personal Flotation Device such as a Lifejacket. Find out what device suits your needs at www.iws.ie.

-      Avoid unsupervised areas. Never swim alone or after dark and do not stay in the water too long as you risk hypothermia.

-      Stay vigilant abroad. The picture-postcard scenes at venues abroad can often mask hidden dangers. Beaches and swimming pools may not be guarded and warning signs may differ.

-      Learn swimming and lifesaving. Irish Water Safety has swimming and lifesaving classes for children and adults.

-      Take lessons when you try a new water sport. Start your lessons, if they're available, before your trip. Be sure you tell a responsible adult, where you plan to go.

-      Never go alone. You'll be safer and have more fun if you pair up with another adult for water sports. If one of you gets into trouble, the other can help - and call for additional help if necessary. Always wear a Personal Flotation Device.

-      Watch for changing weather. Be prepared to get out of the water and take cover if the skies look threatening.

-      Avoid alcohol. Water sports and alcohol don't mix. Tragically, alcohol is often a factor in adult deaths from drowning or injuries incurred in the water. Alcohol impairs judgment, balance and coordination - all essential for swimming and boating well and avoiding hazards in the water.

-      Watch children constantly. Children are irresistibly attracted to water. Take the time to protect your children from the dangers of water.

-      Lifejackets Checklist

Visually Check all lifejackets and buoyancy aids for the following deficiencies:

Ensure CO2 Cartridges have not been punctured and are secured firmly

Ensure all zips, buckles, fasteners and webbing straps are functioning correctly and adjusted to fit the user

Check that their lights, if fitted are operating correctly

Ensure that Automatic Inflation devices if fitted are fully serviced and in date

Check that the valve or lifejacket is not leaking by inflating the lifejacket overnight

Discard any faulty lifejackets by destroying them

-      In Marine Emergencies, call 999 or 112 and ask for Marine Rescue.

Water-related tragedies happen in the blink of an eye and it is a tragedy that an average of 146 lives are lost to drowning each year. Make sure you return safely to shore - and ultimately back home - by playing it safe.

Published in Marine Warning
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#NEWS UPDATE - The latest Marine Notice from the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport (DTTAS) advises on a pipeline survey in the Celtic Sea next month.

PSE Kinsale Energy Limited will be commencing the survey of the 24" Gas Export Pipeline on 6 March 2012 using the Marine Institute vessel RV Celtic Voyager (call sign EIQN). The survey is expected to last 1 to 2 days, depending on weather conditions.

The survey will take place along the existing pipeline route in the Celtic Sea, between the shoreline at Inch Beach in Co Cork and gas platform 'Alpha'.

The RV Celtic Voyager will display appropriate lights and signals, and will be towing side scan sonar with cables of up to 200m long. A Radio Navigation Warning will be issued via the Irish Coast Guard (schedule Bravo, four times a day) prior to the vessel's arrival at the survey area. The vessel will also keep a listening watch on VHF Channel 16.

All vessels, particularly those engaged in fishing, are requested to give the RV Celtic Voyager and her towed equipment a wide berth and keep a sharp lookout in the relevant areas.

Further details for seafarers, including relevant co-ordinates, are included in Marine Notice No 7 of 2012, a PDF of which is available to read and download HERE.

Published in News Update

Ireland has battened down the hatches because of fears Hurricane Katia would wreak widespread havoc with storm-force winds and giant waves. The Coast Guard has issued a weather alert warning people to stay away from cliff edges. Boaters are also warned of the dangers of walking near exposed quays.

hurricane_katia

Hurricane Katia as seen from the space station

Published in Marine Warning

The Irish Coast Guard has advised members of the public to take care in the current severe weather conditions, particularly around the coast and in exposed areas.

Sea Activities
Avoid sea or water-based activities today if possible.

Cliff Walking
There is safety in numbers. Always let someone know when and where you are going, and when you are expected to return. Stay well away from cliff edges, both top and bottom. Don't attempt to rescue people or pets if they fell over a cliff edge. If assistance is needed dial 999 or 112 and ask for the Coast Guard.

Published in Marine Warning
The UK Coastguard is warning coastal visitors to check tide times after multiple incidents around the country where people have been cut off by the tide.

Coastguard coordination centres have dealt with at least eight different incidents this afternoon involving a total of 16 people who have become cut off by incoming tides at different places around the coast.

In Pembrokeshire, six people were rescued from the water by Little Haven RNLI lifeboat at Setlands Beach near Broad Haven and at St Dogmaels the Cardigan RNLI inshore lifeboat recovered a woman who was stuck thigh deep in mud.

Humber Coastguard was alerted to two people and their dogs trapped by a fast rising tide near Bridlington.  They were unsure of their location and as rescue units began searching for them, the couple were fortunately spotted by Hornsea Rescue lifeboat who recovered them from the water in a distressed condition.

Mike Bill, Coastguard Watch Manager at Humber Coastguard says,

"Coastguards are warning people at the coast to check tide times to ensure you are not caught out.  Talk about how the tides work with your family and make sure everyone understands how tides work and what the dangers are when walking at the coast."

Published in Marine Warning
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As the UK Bank holiday approaches the UK coastguard has issed a warning to check tides and stay safe. With the school holidays well underway and the busy bank holiday weekend around the corner, coastguards and the Shipping Minister are coming together to remind families, children and visitors of the importance of checking weather and tide times to stay safe whilst at the beach and along the coast.

Already this summer coastguards have dealt with many beach-related incidents, with a particularly high number of people being caught out by the tide and needing to be rescued after becoming stranded.  Since 1st July, almost 150 such rescues have been carried out around the UK coast, with around 80% involving children.

This latest advice is part of an ongoing programme by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency to remind those who visit our coast to have a great time and remain safe. So before you go check out the weather, sea conditions and the tide times (you can find this information on the web or many beaches display it at their entrance).  That way you can enjoy the sea safely.

In addition to checking the tide times, remember that inflatable boats and toys can be great fun, but they are more suitable for use in swimming pools than at the beach.  If you do use one at the beach, make sure that it is tethered to an adult who is in the sea with you and never use it if there is an offshore wind.  Inflatable boats and toys can easily be blown off shore, then overturn. If you are blown out to sea on an inflatable boat or toy wave your arms in the air and shout for help. If you are out of your depth, don't attempt to swim back to shore.

Be careful around cliffs and rocks – they can be slippery and crumbly. Don't climb them unless you are properly kitted out. And don't attempt to rescue people or dogs from cliffs – call 999 and ask for the coastguard.

Coastguards are also encouraging parents, grandparents and other adults to ensure that children are properly supervised on the coast. We deal with numerous cases of lost children every year and it can be very distressing for children and adults alike. Some beaches provide beach band schemes which help to re-unite children with their families if they become separated, so take advantage of these schemes if appropriate.

Try to go to a lifeguarded beach if you can and stay within the flagged area.

If you notice that someone is in difficulty, either alert the lifeguard if one is available or call the Coastguard on 999.

Shipping Minister Mike Penning said:

"As an island nation, enjoying a seaside holiday is a great British tradition.  The UK has some of the finest coastline in the world, and I want everyone to be able to enjoy it safely.  Already this year we have seen how something as simple as familiarising yourself with the tide times before you set out can make all the difference.  That is why I am encouraging anyone thinking of heading for the coast to take a few sensible precautions so they return home safely and with fond memories of a great day out.    I would also like to pay tribute to our coastguard staff and volunteers who do such a great job to keep those who use our coastline as safe as possible."

Published in Marine Warning
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The Half Ton Class was created by the Offshore Racing Council for boats within the racing band not exceeding 22'-0". The ORC decided that the rule should "....permit the development of seaworthy offshore racing yachts...The Council will endeavour to protect the majority of the existing IOR fleet from rapid obsolescence caused by ....developments which produce increased performance without corresponding changes in ratings..."

When first introduced the IOR rule was perfectly adequate for rating boats in existence at that time. However yacht designers naturally examined the rule to seize upon any advantage they could find, the most noticeable of which has been a reduction in displacement and a return to fractional rigs.

After 1993, when the IOR Mk.III rule reached it termination due to lack of people building new boats, the rule was replaced by the CHS (Channel) Handicap system which in turn developed into the IRC system now used.

The IRC handicap system operates by a secret formula which tries to develop boats which are 'Cruising type' of relatively heavy boats with good internal accommodation. It tends to penalise boats with excessive stability or excessive sail area.

Competitions

The most significant events for the Half Ton Class has been the annual Half Ton Cup which was sailed under the IOR rules until 1993. More recently this has been replaced with the Half Ton Classics Cup. The venue of the event moved from continent to continent with over-representation on French or British ports. In later years the event is held biennially. Initially, it was proposed to hold events in Ireland, Britain and France by rotation. However, it was the Belgians who took the ball and ran with it. The Class is now managed from Belgium. 

At A Glance – Half Ton Classics Cup Winners

  • 2017 – Kinsale – Swuzzlebubble – Phil Plumtree – Farr 1977
  • 2016 – Falmouth – Swuzzlebubble – Greg Peck – Farr 1977
  • 2015 – Nieuwport – Checkmate XV – David Cullen – Humphreys 1985
  • 2014 – St Quay Portrieux – Swuzzlebubble – Peter Morton – Farr 1977
  • 2013 – Boulogne – Checkmate XV – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1985
  • 2011 – Cowes – Chimp – Michael Kershaw – Berret 1978
  • 2009 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978
  • 2007 – Dun Laoghaire – Henri-Lloyd Harmony – Nigel Biggs – Humphreys 1980~
  • 2005 – Dinard – Gingko – Patrick Lobrichon – Mauric 1968
  • 2003 – Nieuwpoort – Général Tapioca – Philippe Pilate – Berret 1978

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