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Displaying items by tag: Annalise Murphy

In a composed heavy weather performance, Annalise Murphy scored a 5 and 2 today to lead the Olympic regatta overall going into tomorrow's rest day.

In a masterful display in races five and six, Murphy produced the same world beating form that saw her lift the European Radial title in 2013. The Dubliner has completed the half–way stage of the competition with an extremely consistent 1, 13, 4, 7, 5, 2 on the scoresheet.

With winds reaching over 20–knots on Rio's Ocean course today, the National Yacht Club star produced her best day on the water yet to lead the regatta by one point. 

However, Anne-Marie Rindom (DEN) had an even better day with scores of 3,1 to move to within a point of Murphy. 

It wasn't such a good outing for the reigning Olympic Champion Lijia Xu (CHN), whose scores of 8,12 have dropped the Chinese sailor down to fifth overall. An even bigger casualty was Evi van Acker (BEL), whose scores of 16,15 have dropped the 2012 bronze medallist to tenth overall. With just four races before the Medal Race, time is running out for van Acker to get back in contention.

After a hectic race five, where Annalise Murphy lost fourth place in the closing stages, a dramatic race six saw Anne-Marie Rindom (DEN) win followed by Annalise then FIN, SWE, LTU, NED, USA, ESP, GBR. 

It puts things incredibly tight at the top of the table. One point behind Ireland's medal hope is Rindom (the only sailor without a result outside the top ten) and World Champion Marit Boumeester of Holland is third just a further point behind. 

radial results rio

Four more races before Monday's final are forecasted to be sailed in lighter winds, adding to the drama of Ireland's Laser Radial medal chance.  Results from Friday and Saturday will decide the top ten for the medal race climax with Annalise's performance to date putting her right in the frame.

Meanwhile, in the Laser class Carlow's Finn Lunch finished 18 and 27 respectively in his two races today and is 24 overall. He has a break tomorrow as well before resuming on Friday.

Published in Olympic
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In an unstoppable performance from Ireland's 'Breeze Queen', Annalise Murphy was again at the top of her Rio Olympic fleet at the half way stage of the Laser Radial regatta today. It puts Annalise (unofficially) third overall, just two points behind Holland and China.

In the waters of the South Atlantic Ocean, the Dubliner recorded another top five result, her third top five result of the regatta so far. 

Sitting in second overall after four skilful races sailed, the Dubliner went again in the Women’s laser radial today on the outside Cocapana course with 19-21 knots from the west, ideal conditions for the Irish helmswoman.

Wearing the silver/blue jersey to denote her place overall, Annalise rounded the first mark in fifth in the 37–boat fleet, about one minute behind leader, Marit Boumeester of Holland.

The top five established a big lead and within that group Annalise moved into fourth behind leaders NED, DEN and USA. It appears that Annalise unfortunately lost out in a reaching duel with Croatian Tina Mihelic in the closing stages and finished fifth and not fourth as reported earlier.

After that, those following the race across the world on the online tracker were frustrated when technology failed! 

The Radial course today was trapezoid, which included two short reaches along with windward-leeward legs. Two laps on the Windward-Leeward section were sailed. 

The provisional finishing order was Marit Bouwmeester (NED) in first followed by USA, DEN, CRO, IRL, GBR, SWE and CHN.

World Sailing continues to struggle with its results system. Results by Rio organisers are here.

 

Published in Olympic
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There's another couple of 12–knot races in prospect for Annalise Murphy in the Olympic Laser Radial class today. But after that all similarities will end for the sailors as today's races five and six are on the Copacabana course which is outside the bay and at sea. It's a crucial stage as the regatta passes the half–way stage. The race area is subject to tidal conditions and winds are expected to be different to anything seen on the first two days, perhaps a little more like Annalise's home waters of Dublin Bay?

Annalise has been training in Rio on at least ten occasions over the past four years and will be familiar with all the course locations being sailed this week.

Start time is 5:10 Irish time. No TV coverage again. 

Published in Olympic

Annalise Murphy has sailed into second overall after two more tricky Rio races today. After an opening Olympic Radial race win yesterday and a 13th scored in race two, she started today with a well earned fourth in race three and this afternoon added a seventh in race four but it might have been even better for the Dublin yachtswoman who briefly lead the final race of the day.

Annalise ascended the rankings after a good day on the innermost Ponte course in Rio's Guanabara Bay. With the discard kicking after three races, China's Lijia Xu was able to discount her disqualification in Race 1, posting the day's best score of 3, 1 to lead by five points from Murphy in second with Denmark's Anne Marie Rindom in bronze, 2 points further back.

While second overall after four races shows a very consistent performance, Annalise will rue the loss of five places in the latter half of the fourth race, slipping from 2nd to 7th at the finish.

Annalise Murphy Marit Boumeester Laser RadialWorld Number one Marit Boumeester (NED) passes ahead of Ireland's Annalise Murphy in race three. Photo: Richard Langdon

After some very tricky sailing over the past two days, the Irish solo sailor is coping well with Rio's notoriously fickle breezes that have so far, at least, blown into double digits for the world renowned Irish 'Breeze Queen'. There is no doubt Annalise is making the very best of the conditions that have been presented to her on the opening two days of the regatta.Race tracker Laser Radial rioIreland's Annalise Murphy was challenging for the lead – and held it for a time – in Race four this afternoon as this screengrab from the live race tracker shows

The National Yacht Club sailor is making good on a prediction she made earlier this year where she included herself in a line up of eight of the girls who have the potential to medal in Rio.

Murphy has been in Rio at least ten times prior to the Games and only a fortnight ago won Rio de Janeiro International Sailing Week at the venue in similar conditions to today. It was obviously a pre–Olympic tonic in an otherwise fallow run of international results for the Irish sailing star. 

This has been a brilliant start for Annalise and Irish sailing, especially after the disappointment of London four years ago, but there is a long way to go with six races to come over the next four days.

Annalise will be out on the Copacabana course which is outside the bay at sea. Tidal conditions and breeze will present a completely different scenario to anything on the first two days which will make for more very interesting racing.

Laser Radial Results Rio OlympicsLaser Radial Results after four races at the Rio Olympics, showing IRL second

On the Men's course, Ireland's Finn Lynch, scored 15 and 40 to lie 24th overall. Argentina leads, with Croatia 2nd and New Zealand third.

Weather
The fresh breeze started the day in the south-south east and gradually veered to the south-south west maintaining a fairly steady pressure close to 12 knots during the race period. Tomorrow, when the Lasers race off the Copacabana beach, will see some showers, cooler temperatures and lighter winds.

Elsewhere
Britain's Nick Dempsey is dominating the RS:X men's board, posting three 1sts, a 2nd and a 4th, while in the female RS:X, Italy is one place ahead of France in RS:X women

Schedule
The Boards have a day off Wednesday, while Lasers and Radials race their fifth and sixth races. The 470s and multihulls get their regatta under way on Wednesday.

Annalise and Finn are back on the water for Race 5 at 5.15pm Irish time tomorrow before Race 6 at approximately 6.40pm. Thursday is a rest/reserve day for the two Laser events. Both the skiff events for men and women begin on Friday when all four of Ireland’s sailors are in action.

Laser Men
1. Julio Alsogaray, ARG, 7
2. Tonci Stipanovic, CRO, 13
3. Sam Meech, NZL, 14
Full results: https://www.rio2016.com/en/sailing-standings-sa-laser-men

Laser Radial Men
1. Lijia Xu, CHN, 7
2. Annalise Murphy, IRL, 12
3. Tuula Tenkanen, FIN, 13.3
Full results: https://www.rio2016.com/en/sailing-standings-sa-laser-radial-women

Published in Olympic

Annalise Murphy has sailed another exceptional race in the the top ten of the Laser Radial fleet in Rio this afternoon. The Irish medal hope moved progessively up the fleet in shifty conditions from eighth to seventh. On the final upwind leg the Dubliner moved in to fifth position within striking distance of fourth.

The race started in light patchy winds and then built to a 12–knot hiking breeze on the Ponte course.

On the final downwind leg the order was HUN, CHN, BEL, DEN and IRL. 

In another huge result for the National Yacht club star, Murphy, wearing the red jersey to indicate her third overall position after two races, overtook the much faniced Dane Ann Marie Rindom on the short reaching leg to the finish to clinch fourth.

Mária Érdi of Hungary was the race winner followed by BEL, CHN and then IRL.

Following yesterday's race win, It's another very impressive result for Murphy in a consistent performance so far in her 37–boat fleet. It's almost certainly going to be a counter in the best of ten–race series this week.

Race four follows this afternoon. No overalls available. The wind has slowly swung from SE to SW. There is a bit more wind on the Ponte course than the other two. Up to 12 knots at times.

Laser radial live trackerThe live tracker facility showed Annalise Murphy well placed in race three of the Radials in 14 knots of wind

 

Published in Olympic

Annalise Murphy has been promoted to third overall at Rio Olympic Sailing Regatta following the disqualification of regatta leader Lijia Xu from race one of the Laser Radial Class yesterday. Murphy is now on 14 points, alongside Evi Van Acker (BEL) and Ashley Stoddart (AUS). The Irish girl is listed ahead of the others due to her win in the first race.

Xu's disqualification was for failing to get well clear of other boats in good time following a port and starboard with American sailor Paige Railey. Demonstrating that seconds are crucial, the jury noted that the Chinese sailor rounded the mark four seconds after the hail and then commenced her turns. Apparently she should have sailed to windward immediately she heard the hail and exonerated herself before the mark.

World Sailing continues to struggle with the results - twelve hours after racing ended they are still not complete.

Races 3 and 4 today for the Lasers and Radials will take place on the Ponte course, the most landward of all the courses. Today's forecast suggests southerly winds building from 11 knots at the 1300 (1700 Irish) start to 16 knots by close of play.

Published in Olympic

Irish sailing's medal hopeful Annalise Murphy is lying fourth overall after her first two races in Rio today.

The National Yacht Club sailor got her Olympic dreams off to a perfect start in an explosive first race. She provided the world with further evidence of her blistering medium to heavy air pace in a cracking first of ten races in the single–handed class.

She opened her account at the 2016 Olympic Games in a very impressive manner, taking the bullet in the first race. Following up with a 14th in race 2, the Rathfarnham sailor made most of the stronger than normal breeze that kicked off the Rio regatta to lie 4th overall after day one.

While the organisation appears to be having some problems with broadcasting the scoring, apologising through the blog for the shortcomings, the conditions in Rio did not fall short with a mean wind speed of 14 knots and gusts up to 18 knots favouring the Escola Naval course, just off the Olympic Marina.

Murphy clearly enjoyed the above average wind speed, and ends the day bookended by two of the pre-event favourites, Denmark's Anne-Marie Rindom in 3rd place and the Belgian Evi Van Acker in 4th. 2012 Gold medallist, Liija Xu of China, leads overall with a 3rd and a 4th, from Marit Bouwmeester of the Netherlands, another pre-regatta favourite, whose 6th and 5th places put her in 2nd overall. 

Murphy's performance will not suprise insiders, only two weeks ago the 25–year–old won in similar conditions in one of the many Rio test events. She has previously said she is one of eight that has the ability to win in Rio. There are 10 races throughout the week before the medal race takes place next Monday, so this is definitely a marathon not a sprint. 

While the Radials are not far off following the predictions, the Laser fleet saw some of the favourites having to recover from deep, particularly in Race 1, where pre-regatta favourites, Tom Burton, (AUS), Nick Thompson (GBR) and Robert Scheidt (BRA) were in the twenties for long periods. Scheidt recovered well to win race 2 as did his wife Gintare (LTU) in the radial fleet, overcoming a U flag disqualification in race 1. 

Annalise's club–mate 20-year-old Finn Lynch is 21st after his two opening races today. The Carlow man came home in 14th and 27th place.

Racing continues tomorrow for both these fleets, with race numbers 3 and 4 scheduled.

Published in Olympic
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Ireland’s six sailing Olympians have reached their selections for the 2016 Games at different times. Some have been secure with their places for many months, while others have been confirmed more recently, with the final place being filled on May 18th. Now, if all goes according to plan, for the next six days they’ll be at some remove from the petty hassles of everyday life, safe in a cocoon of mental and physical security as the clock ticks steadily on towards their appointment with destiny. The official opening of the 2016 Games is in Rio de Janeiro next Friday (August 5th). Then for the ISA squad, it’s into practice races and the start of the Sailing Olympiad on Monday August 8th. W M Nixon takes an overview.

The Olympic Games are very important for Irish sailing. Some would say disproportionately so, while a few contrarians might even argue that, as a vehicle and equipment sport as much as a physical pursuit, sailing is questionably Olympian in the first place, and certainly not mainstream.

Perhaps. But for a specialist sport like sailing, the Olympics provide a unique four year opportunity to be in the national and international limelight. Over the years, we’ve learned that an Olympic Medal – or even the prospect of one - is a matter for general interest and celebration regardless of how the sport in question is perceived by the general public at home.

Like it or not, the Olympics simplify it all. And the value of winning a medal, even the most modest one, is almost beyond quantification. But at the very least, if at the Olympics you put in an honourable performance, clearly give of your very best, do your uttermost as part of a warm human story, then your sport’s feelgood factor rises to provide new levels of interest and tangible support at official level.

Annalise Murphy2The Olympics may reduce sailing to its basics, but when a medal seems a possibility – as for Annalise Murphy in 2012 – suddenly our specialist sport comes centre stage at national level

But how can Olympic sailing project itself as something of particular human interest? It’s simple. People want a people story, and while sailors will happily discuss the minutiae of boat design, sail shape and equipment structure for hours on end, Joe and Josephine Public think a boat is just a thing, and an odd, often wet, and uncomfortable thing at that. They want a human story with which they can identify, and if they don’t get that human story - and quickly – their interest will immediately move elsewhere, for there’s any amount of ready distraction in today’s world.

Time was when the Olympics were about catering for the needs of the athletes, but now the demands of an instant global audience dictate everything. And time also was when the sailing Olympics had at least as many keelboat classes as it had dinghies, and the venue was selected at locations sometimes hundreds of miles from the hosting city in order to provide “ideal” sailing conditions.

But in this age of cities, the demands of the glamour city dominate, and if the host city happens to be picturesquely beside the sea, then that’s where your sailing will be, regardless of the effect of a steep coastline and high buildings on the winds of the race area.

As for keelboats in the sailing Olympics, forget it. Ballast keels reduce the need for athletic capability. And forget individuality and a sense of ownership in boats. Today’s Olympic sailing ideal is exemplified by the Laser, with anonymous newly-manufactured utterly standard boats, sails and masts allocated only days before the event, thereby making the athleticism and ability of the sailors the paramount factor, rather than having any technological edge in boat and equipment.

This paring-back of our beloved sport means that the inevitably ageist structure of the modern Olympic sailing team is not at all representative of the true overall picture of modern world sailing, with its themes of a Sport for Life, and Love Your Boat. With our global spread of 143 different boat classes entitled to hold a world championship, sailing is something of a mystery for the rest of the world. Yet it’s only with the artificially-imposed simplicities of Olympic sailing that we get a chance to explain what it might be about.

Or more accurately, we get a chance to see how the general run of journalists respond to sailing. For it’s only with the very big things of popular interest like the Olympics and maybe the America’s Cup, and perhaps disaster stories like the Fastnet Race of 1979, that your solitary sailing journo gets to rub shoulders with other journalists. So when the ISA staged a Press & Radio Conference this week for the media to meet and question the 2016 Olympic Sailing squad, we went along not to ask questions ourselves, but rather to hear what sort of questions these inquiring representatives of the outside world would ask about sailing.

It’s ironic, but once upon a time it was thought that yachting reports should really appear in the social and gossip pages rather than in the sports pages. Yet today, thanks to its involvement in the Olympics with that nationally-electrifying almost-Medal of 2012 and the ever-increasing emphasis on human stories, sailing is now accepted in Ireland as a proper sport.

sailing was best reported in the social and gossip pagesOnce upon a time, it was thought that sailing was best reported in the social and gossip pages...

But the reality beyond that is that all sports, sailing included, are now being reported with the emphasis on the human angle rather than on the athletic and technical issues, though of course good old-fashioned winning is still paramount. But as for how that win is achieved – well, open any sports section of a print newspaper (remember them?) and most of the photos will be of people, frequently in facial close-up and showing extreme reaction to some incident or achievement which is of itself so incidental that it is seldom illustrated.

Thus we’re getting to the stage that serious newspapers are veering away from carrying anything like old-fashioned social diaries. Today any event – whether it be a sports championship, company annual general meeting, or a major political announcement – is reported as though it belongs in the social diary, becoming just another happening in the daily progress through the world of the nation’s social life.

So although Tuesday’s press conference made token gestures of getting to grips with how our youngest Olympic sailor Finn Lynch seems to do all his main training in Croatia, and whether or not Annalise Murphy has been made ill by the fact that she has put in significant time during the past three years training in the polluted waters of Rio de Janeiro (she hasn’t), really what the press corps wanted was human stories based on past events to which their readers could relate, and happily for Irish Olympic sailing, our team could come up with the goods.

Thus next morning’s papers came up with a story in the general news pages about how Saskia Tidey continues to draw inspiration from her 81-year-old kidnap-surviving dad Don, while another paper had the sports pages telling of how Annalise Murphy came within a whisker of winning the Bronze in 2012, but then came to terms with it, put it behind her, and went into the dedicated count-down towards Rio 2016.

Andrea Brewster and Saskia Tidey4Andrea Brewster and Saskia Tidey, 49erFX Olympic crewAs for the 49er guys from the north, Ryan Seaton & Matt McGovern, they provided oodles of copy about just how they’ve managed to stay together for so long to such an extent that you could see a spectral “The Odd Couple” sign hovering over them during their part of the show.

And then to give everyone a warm community feeling, we’d the real page-turner of how Finn Lynch of Bennekerry in County Carlow comes to be the youngest sailor in Ireland’s Olympic squad. As the details of that were teased out, we may have learned more about the GAA in Bennekerry and the little sailing club in Blessington than we did about the Laser in Rio. But if the purpose of Tuesday’s gathering was to give Irish Olympic sailing a friendly and responsive human face, then Finn Lynch and his team mates have won gold in the social stakes already.

Carlow Profoundly rural – Finn Lynch’s home county of Carlow
Finn LynchThe Young Man and The Sea – Finn Lynch takes the Olympic Laser place in Mexico on May 18th

Their boats? At the conference, boats were very quickly shunted aside in the pursuit of human stories. Boats are trouble enough to comprehend, sailing boats are double trouble. The problem with sailing boats is sails. Mysterious sails harnessing the invisible wind can make the straightforward fact of Olympic participation into something very weird.

With rowing, by contrast, you may have boats, yet it’s so obviously sheer athletic prowess which brings rowing success. But sailing? For sure, athletic ability, training and coaching are more important than ever. But sails and the wind remain firmly in the region of the sacred mysteries. Thus far from trying to group sailing together with rowing and swimming as water-based sports, it’s arguable that the only Olympic area which shares a unique complexity with sailing is equestrianism, for a sailing boat can seem as much of a living thing as a horse.

So how are our sailors of the sea horses going to do in Rio? As Annalise Murphy has more experience of the venue than anyone else, her opinions were of special interest. She crisply dismissed any grumblings about the flukiness of the sailing waters by saying that the unpredictability is so general in sailing in Rio’s winter (or what passes for winter when you’re near enough to the equator) that in the end it’s the same for everyone.

Certainly she’s giving it her best shot, and she has benefitted – as have all the Irish sailing squad - from the involvement (intensive in her case) of uber-coach Gary Keegan of the Institute of Sport. He’s leaving the Institute for a new venture after the Olympics, but for now, he has helped guide Murphy to peak form, thanks to a closely-controlled weight reduction programme as part of a carefully-monitored training plan which, at Tuesday’s conference, had the Irish sailor looking extremely fit and well, with her mental outlook in a very good place.

Annalise Murphy radialAnnalise Murphy in thoughtful mood on Tuesday. Photo: Dan Sheridan/INPHO
Inevitably the new-look Murphy has to be the most likely medal prospect, for despite her significant height, she’s certainly rated as a contender by her peers. Of the rest of the team, the two 49er guys have shown they can do it, they won the gold in Palma in April but have been erratic since, yet with the selected nature of the Olympic fleets, they could well be on the money.

Ryan Seaton and Matt McGovern8Ryan Seaton and Matt McGovern keeping busy
Andrea Brewster and Saskia Tidey on the women’s skiff made it into the Olympic qualification by the skin of their teeth, but if a sporting outlook and gallant determination are keys to success, then their showing will have an added interest.

While the rest of the team have been on the scene for a while, Finn Lynch is the new kid on the block. But despite only turning twenty back in April and then not getting his Olympic qualification until May, he has been maturing before our very eyes ever since he started this particular journey a year ago.

The Finn Lynch story just builds and builds, for not only is he the youngest member of the Irish sailing team by far, but he is competing in the most numerous class as the Lasers will be mustering 46 boats at Rio. And he will find himself racing in the distinguished company of one of the most popular sailors in the world, Brazil’s legendary Robert Scheidt, who at 43 will be the oldest competitor in the Sailing Olympics 2016.

There are great stories already there. And there could be some mighty stories in the making. As ISA Performance Director James O’Callaghan put it, it may be very much an outside shot, but we might even be due a medal. Either way, our dedicated Olympic squad – sailors and coaches alike – have brought sailing centre stage in the Irish consciousness for the next three weeks. But for now, they’re very deservedly in seclusion even if, in the outside world, the rumour mills will inevitably grind on.

James OCallaghan Sailing9ISA Performance Director James O’Callaghan in Rio de Janeiro

Published in W M Nixon

China's Lijia Xu, The Netherlands' Marit Bouwmeester and Belgium's Evi Van Acker, medallists from London 2012, will make their Olympic return in the One Person Dinghy (Laser Radial) at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. For Ireland's fourth placed Annalise Murphy it is a chance to settle old scores.

The four were locked in a thrilling winner take all Medal Race battle at the London 2012 Olympic Games with Annalise missing out on the podium in Weymouth and Portland, Great Britain.

Four years on and Xu returns to defend her crown, Bouwmeester and Van Acker will be aiming to go one and two spots up whereas Murphy will be wanting to vanquish the demons from London 2012.

The Chinese racer initially stepped away from the sport after London 2012 but the lure was too strong as she made a return to Olympic sailing at the end of 2015.

"Of course the goal is to get another medal,” explained Xu, "but realistically it's a very short time, only one year, to prepare.

"I decided to retire because of so many injuries. I suffered quite a lot and I wanted to have a healthy body to live the rest of my life with, rather than having pain here and there. Last August I suddenly felt that the Olympics was still something that fired me up. After two years break I actually felt my body was recovering much better than before so I thought why not give it another try.”

Xu has secured some steady results since making her return with a silver medal at the 2016 Sailing World Cup Weymouth and Portland regatta the highlight. Whatever her result at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games is, the picture is much broader for Xu, "The Olympics is just part of the goal and I want to lead an active life forever and leave a legacy for Chinese sailing. That's the ultimate goal I'm seeking and the Olympics is just a part of it.

"I think I am one of the few who is doing something I truly love and enjoy doing. Of course, in terms of Olympic sailing and the Olympic circuit it takes a lot of effort and you need to be prepared to make some sacrifices like being away from home, travelling a lot and spending thousands of hours in the gym and on the water.

"So long as you find something that interests you it will motivate you to keep going, no matter what lies ahead. I feel very lucky to find sailing as not just my hobby but as my career.”

As for the form guide, Bouwmeester and Van Acker have dominated the Laser Radial over the Olympic quadrennial. The Dutch and Belgian racers have featured regularly on World Championship, European Championship, Sailing World Cup and Olympic Test Event podiums. They will both be major contenders in Rio.

Building up to the 2016 Games, the World Championship titles have been shared four ways. Tina Mihelic of Croatia took the title in 2013, Bouwmeester snapped it up in 2014 followed by Anne Marie Rindom (DEN) in 2015 and Alison Young (GBR) in 2016. Mihelic, Rindom and Young have the Olympic experience under their belts as well so know what it takes to perform.

Away from the World Championships, Lithuania's Gintare Scheidt, Beijing 2008 silver medallist and wife of Brazilian sailing legend Robert, claimed gold at the 2015 Olympic Test Event. Scheidt will be making her third Olympic appearance and will also have the honour of carrying her nations flag at the Opening Ceremony on 5 August.

Further leading lights of the Laser Radial, who will have an eye on the podium, are Tatiana Drozdovskaya (BLR), Veronika Fenclova (CZE), Tuula Tenkanen (FIN), Ireland's Murphy, Josefin Olsson (SWE) and Paige Railey (USA).

Much like the Men's One Person Dinghy (Laser), the Laser Radial will feature some of the tightest, tactical racing at Rio 2016 and any sailor on any given day could come up with a performance of a lifetime to seal the deal.

Racing will commence at 13:10 local time on Monday 8 August on the Escola Naval racing area.

 

Published in Olympic

The chances of winning an Olympic sailing medal next month, have been described by Team manager James O'Callaghan as an 'outside shot'. Can Ireland's four boat Irish Olympic Sailing Team deliver on the 36–year medal drought? Afloat.ie gives its assessment boat by boat

Belfast Lough's Ryan Seaton and Matt McGovernBelfast Lough's Ryan Seaton and Matt McGovern start racing in Rio on August 12

49er – Ryan Seaton & Matt McGovern 

Ryan Seaton and Matthew McGovern have been steadily working their way up the world rankings this year, from 22ncd at the start of the year to 11th in the latest version. These London 2012 veterans (14th) have put in some stellar performances in recent months, most notably winning the Princesa Sofia Regatta in Palma in April.
Seaton and McGovern qualified Ireland at the first possible opportunity at the combined World Championships in Santander in 2014, finishing 8th. But their performance since has been erratic and the win in Palma was bookended by a 37th in Miami and a 28th at the 2016 Europeans. Most recently, at the international sailing week in Rio, the Belfast pair finished down the fleet, but may have been using this regatta for testing or training purposes.
There is no doubt, that on their day, Seaton and McGovern can compete with the world's best.

Men’s Skiff (49er) 20 competitors Race duration: 3 x 30 minutes daily (medal race 1 x 20 minutes) Competition days: Fri 12th/Sat 13th/Sun 14th (Reserve)/Mon 15th/Tue 16th/Wed 17th (Reserve)/Thu 18th - medal race/Fri 19th (Reserve)

Andrea Brewster and Saskia Tidey Dublin Bay's Andrea Brewster and Saskia Tidey start racing in Rio on August 12

49erFx – Andrea Brewster & Saskia Tidey 

Andrea Brewster and Saskia Tidey were the last of the Irish team to qualify, enduring heartbreak at the 2015 worlds where they were denied qualification by a protest in the final race report here. However, their performance at the Worlds was good enough to secure the next available place a few months later when no team from Africa emerged. Story here.
Brewster, a product of the British Olympic Laser radial squad, and Tidey, who transitioned from the Radial to the 49er following a season racing 18ft Skiffs in Sydney, have, until this year, hovered in the early 20s in world ranking and results at major events. 2016 has been something of a breakthrough for the Royal Irish duo, finishing in the teens more consistently, including a 12th at the European championships in Barcelona in April. A final day scoreline of 2,1,3 shows the potential that resides in this team.

Women’s Skiff (49erFX) 20 competitors Race duration: 3 x 30 minutes daily (medal race 1 x 20 minutes) Competition days: Fri 12th/Sat 13th/Sun 14th (Reserve)/Mon 15th/Tue 16th/Wed 17th (Reserve)/Thu 18th - medal race/Fri 19th (Reserve)

finn lynch6Dublin Bay's Finn Lynch starts racing in Rio on August 8

Laser – Finn Lynch  

Finn Lynch's fairytale journey to Rio is recounted in Sailing on Saturdays by Winkie Nixon. However he had to overcome the 2012 Olympian James Espey, who's 38th place at the 2014 world Championship in Santander qualified the country. ISA imposed a three regatta trials system, starting with the Copa de Brasil regatta in Rio in December 2015, where Espey shaded Lynch by one place. At the next event in Palma in March and April, neither sailor made gold fleet, but Espey increased his advantage with a 53rd to Lynch's 58th. Going into the final trial, the 2016 Laser Worlds in Mexico in May, Lynch had it all to do, but a solid series of consistent results saw him qualify for the Gold Fleet, while Espey never really got off the ground until it was too late. 

While Lynch, who's best results have been at under age events, is certainly not a favourite for podium in Rio, his trajectory suggests that a medal in Tokyo in 2020 is well within his capability.

Men’s One-person dinghy (Laser) 46 competitors Race duration: 2 x 50 minutes daily (medal race 1 x 25 minutes) Competition days: Mon 8th/Tue 9th/Wed 10th/Thu 11th (Reserve day)/Fri 12th/Sat 13th/Sun 14th (Reserve)/Mon 15th - medal race/Tue 16th (Reserve)

annalise murphy SOFDublin Bay's Annalise Murphy starts racing in Rio on August 8

Laser Radial – Annalise Murphy 

Currently perhaps Ireland's most famous sailor, Annalise Murphy dismissed the challenge of Aoife Hopkins in the three event trial. However, recent form contradicts her suggestion that she is one of eight in the fleet with the potential to win a medal in Rio. Since January, her results at major events have been 48th (Miami World Cup), 30th (Laser Europeans), 39th (Laser Worlds) and 34th (Weymouth World Cup). The historical profile of light and fickle winds at the Olympic venue suggests that Annalise, a heavy weather specialist, will struggle to make the medal race. The 2013 European champion has, however, surprised on many occasions before and as recently as this month scored an important win on Olympic waters in her last regatta before the Games at the Rio de Janeiro International Sailing Week. Results of that win are here.

Women’s One-person dinghy (Laser Radial) 37 competitors Race duration: 2 x 50 minutes daily (medal race 1 x 25 minutes) Competition days: Mon 8th/Tue 9th/Wed 10th/Thu 11th (Reserve day)/Fri 12th/Sat 13th/Sun 14th (Reserve)/Mon 15th - medal race/Tue 16th (Reserve)

Afloat.ie has charted the progress of the 2016 Olympic sailing team over the last four years in a dedicated Irish Olympic Sailing section

Published in Olympic
Page 10 of 35

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