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Displaying items by tag: RosslareZeebrugge

As previously speculated, Finnlines is to open a new freight route of Rosslare Europort-Zeebrugge with the Belgium link also offering a new connection between Ireland and the Nordic nation.

On 23 July, Finnlines will launch the new service linking Ireland and mainland Europe and there will be two departures per week from each direction.

The route will be operated by the ro-ro vessel, Finnpulp, which has the capacity to carry 3,259 lane metres of cargo, equivalent to around 225 trailers. The vessel can also accommodate 12 drivers 

Finnpulp, ship data

Ship type: ro-ro cargo
Built: 2002/2009
Length: 187 m
DWT: 11,682
GT: 25,732
Service speed: 20 knots

Demand for freight services from Ireland to Continental Europe has grown in the wake of Brexit and the new route will provide a crucial link for Irish industry. The Finnish industry, as well as German and Spanish industries, will also have an easier access to Ireland via transshipment in Zeebrugge.

“We are delighted to support the growing post-Brexit Irish trade to the Continent and provide transport operators with an important alternative route, which will greatly benefit all stakeholders and the Irish economy. Finnlines provides cost-efficient and high frequency liner services to its customers with the lowest CO2 emissions per transported cargo unit, ” says Antonio Raimo, Line Manager at Finnlines.

“Finnlines is proud to expand its route network and upgrade its services to support its customers to grow and develop new businesses,” confirms Tom Pippingsköld, Finnlines President and CEO.

Finnlines specialises in freight transport and the extensive line network provides Finland’s export industry with a regular and reliable way to the European market, while ensuring imports of goods that are important for security of supply.

Published in Rosslare Europort

Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) is one of Europe's biggest yacht racing clubs. It has almost sixteen hundred elected members. It presents more than 100 perpetual trophies each season some dating back to 1884. It provides weekly racing for upwards of 360 yachts, ranging from ocean-going forty footers to small dinghies for juniors.

Undaunted by austerity and encircling gloom, Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC), supported by an institutional memory of one hundred and twenty-nine years of racing and having survived two world wars, a civil war and not to mention the nineteen-thirties depression, it continues to present its racing programme year after year as a cherished Dublin sporting institution.

The DBSC formula that, over the years, has worked very well for Dun Laoghaire sailors. As ever DBSC start racing at the end of April and finish at the end of September. The current commodore is Eddie Totterdell of the National Yacht Club.

The character of racing remains broadly the same in recent times, with starts and finishes at Club's two committee boats, one of them DBSC's new flagship, the Freebird. The latter will also service dinghy racing on Tuesdays and Saturdays. Having more in the way of creature comfort than the John T. Biggs, it has enabled the dinghy sub-committee to attract a regular team to manage its races, very much as happened in the case of MacLir and more recently with the Spirit of the Irish. The expectation is that this will raise the quality of dinghy race management, which, operating as it did on a class quota system, had tended to suffer from a lack of continuity.