Menu

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Coleraine

Police officers in Coleraine have been praised after their rescue of two kayakers from the River Bann in Northern Ireland earlier this week.

Dog walkers noticed the kayakers had gotten into difficulty in the river at around 6.20pm on Tuesday 9 January. They called 999 and multiple emergency and voluntary services were dispatched to the area.

PSNI officers were the first emergency responders on the scene and found the kayakers clinging to branches after being caught in an unexpectedly strong tide.

Two officers entered the cold water and, with the assistance of colleagues on the riverbank, were able to bring the men safely to waiting ambulances which took them to hospital for treatment.

Speaking to BBC News NI, Superintendent Mark Roberts said: “The change in the current was so strong, one of the kayaks was swept away, leaving a gentleman clinging to a tree and another one just standing in the water off the bank.”

Both kayakers were taken to Causeway Hospital in Coleraine for treatment after their ordeal.

Chief Inspector Vince Redmond commented: “I am delighted that these men were brought to safety, and that our officers showed such resourcefulness, skill and courage.

“Their work on Tuesday evening was the embodiment of ‘keeping people safe’ in our community.

“This was a fantastic example of collaborative working with our colleagues from Northern Ireland Ambulance Service, Northern Ireland Fire and Rescue Service and the indispensable volunteers of Community Rescue Service. There’s no doubt in my mind that lives were saved as a result.”

Published in Rescue
Tagged under

With the RNLI’s summer lifeguard service now ended for 2020, swimmers and surfers on Northern Ireland’s North Coast have been urged “to be extra vigilant”.

The warning from Coleraine Coastguard comes after three swimmers got into difficulty at Castlerock Beach on Friday (18 September).

One swimmer made it to shore while the others were helped ashore by a local surfer. All three were medically assessed by coastguard officers and the NI Ambulance Service.

The casualties were “shocked” by their ordeal “but thankfully fit and well”, Coleraine Coastguard said later.

“Conditions on our beaches can change quickly and strong currents are currently running with the high tides,” the coastguard added.

“Now that the summer lifeguard service has ended around most of our beaches, we urge people to be extra vigilant when swimming or surfing.

“If you see anyone in difficulty, don’t hesitate to dial 999 [and ask for the] coastguard.”

A volunteer with Coleraine Coastguard returned home from a callout to a masked gang who dragged him out of his car before tying him up and burgling his home, as BBC News reports.

HM Coastguard confirmed the incident in the early hours of Wednesday 24 June, which affected an “experienced volunteer” who had been part of a search for missing people on Portrush beach, on Northern Ireland’s north coast, before his assault.

The PSNI said that while the man was not physically injured, a number of items were stolen from his property in what they described as “a terrifying ordeal”.

BBC News has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastguard
Tagged under

Coleraine Coastguard is back in business after a reported burglary at its station during Storm Gareth on Tuesday night (12 March).

Volunteers woke yesterday morning (Wednesday 13 March) to find that their station “had been broken into and ransacked”.

The North Coast station was taken offline while the PSNI completely investigations and volunteers could determine that its equipment was safe to use.

Volunteers were given the all-clear by 4.30pm yesterday to resume their rescue services.

And they have appealed for anyone with information about the burglary — one of a spate of incidents throughout the town on Tuesday night — to contact the PSNI.

Published in Coastguard

#Rowing: Bann Head has been cancelled. The organisers joined those of Skibbereen Head in deciding that the weather conditions might have endangered contestants. The Coleraine event and the Skibbereen Head at the National Rowing Centre were both set for tomorrow, Saturday.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Clubs from Coleraine to Shandon competed at the sun-graced Carlow Regatta, and a Commercial crew won the men’s eight. The two-day event was a chance for young rowers to test themselves. The host club proved strongest in some of the biggest races. On Saturday, Carlow won the men’s and women’s club two quadruples and doubles and the women’s club two single. The men’s club one single went to Muckross.  On Sunday, the Carlow women’s junior 16 eight, quad and double won, as did the men’s junior 16 double.

Carlow Regatta, Selected Results

Saturday

Men

Eight – Sen: Commercial. Four – Masters: Waterford, Belfast BC, Neptune, Commercial, Galway.

Sculling, Quadruple – Club Two: Carlow. Jun 18B: Three Castles. Masters: Offaly.

 Double – Club Two: Carlow. Jun 18B: Three Castles. Masters: Shandon B.

Single – Club One: Muckross. Club Two: Shandon B. Masters: Athlone (Gallen)

Women

Sculling, Quadruple – Club Two: Carlow. Jun 18A: Carlow A. Junior 18B: Carlow. Masters: Athlone.

Double – Club Two: Carlow A. Jun 18A: Carlow.  Jun 18B: Graiguenamanagh.

Single – Club Two: Carlow (Corcoran). Jun 18A: Carlow (Scully) Jun 18B: Muckross (Coffey). Masters: Graiguenamanagh (Murray).

Sunday

Men

Sculling, Double – Jun 16: Carlow

Women

Eight – Jun 16: Carlow.

Sculling, Quadruple – Jun 16: Carlow. Double – Jun 16: Carlow.

 

Published in Rowing

#Coastguard - Coleraine Coastguard headed to the rescue of a man and three children caught in a rip current at Castlerock over the weekend following the Portrush Raft Race.

According to BBC News, the four were on bodyboards when they were swept away by the current on Saturday 26 May - though they managed to get back to shore before the coastguard team arrived.

None needed hospital treatment, however they were attended to by the NI Ambulance Service for shock and the cold, as well as for swallowing sea water.

As reported earlier on Afloat.ie, Bundoran RNLI were involved in the rescue of a man and boy caught in a rip current off Bundoran beach yesterday (Sunday 27 May).

Elsewhere, the Irish Examiner reports that a man was airlifted to hospital after falling overboard from his boat off the Clare coast yesterday afternoon.

Irish Coast Guard units from Kilkee and Doolin as well as the Rescue 115 helicopter from Shannon were dispatched to the scene, where the man had fallen from a dive boat and was unable to leave the water due to an injury.

The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastguard

#Rowing: The Workmen’s junior women’s double took a silver at the National Schools’ Regatta at Dorney Lake in England today. In the Championship Doubles, Annie O’Donoghue and Ciara Browne finished one and a half lengths down on Latymer Upper School. Ciara Moynihan of Workmen’s finished seventh in the A Final of the Championship Singles, while Molly Curry of Coleraine Grammar School took control of the B Final and won.

 Enniskillen took silver in the Boys’ Non-Championship Eights, and their girls’ junior 16 coxed four matched them in their A Final. Ireland clubs placed second and third in the B Final of the Girls’ Championship/Non Championship Eights.

British National Schools’ Regatta, Dorney Lake (Selected Results; Irish interest)

 

Saturday

Boys

Championship/Non-Championship Eight – B Final: 3 Enniskillen RBC.

Girls

Championship/Non-Championship Eight – B Final: 2 Galway 7:35.72; 3 St Michael’s 7:45.46.

Junior 16 Four, coxed – A Final: 2 Enniskillen RBC 8:22.68.

Sculling, Double – Championship A Final: 2 Workmen’s (A O’Donoghue, C Browne) 8:06.37.

Single – Championship A Final: 7 Workmen’s (C Moynihan) 9:10.40. B Final: 1 Coleraine Grammar School (M Curry) 8:43.03.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Galway’s Coláiste Iognáid won the prize as the top school at the Irish Schools’ Regatta at O’Brien’s Bridge today. There were 11 hours of competition on a sunny, cool day. St Brigid’s, Killarney, which won the women’s under-23 eight, were second overall – Coláiste Iognáid had won the equivalent men’s race and the Junior 16 men’s eight.

 Coleraine Grammar School had a good day. They won the women’s junior 16 eight and Molly Curry won the women’s under-23 single, though she is still a teenager. Jack Dorney, competing for St Francis, was the top men’s under-23 sculler. Tristan Orlic of St Vincent's took the honours at junior 16 level. 

Irish Schools’ Regatta, O’Brien’s Bridge, Sunday (Selected Results)

Men

Eight – Under-23: Col Iognáid. Jun 16: Col Iognáid.

Four – Under-23, coxed: CBC, Cork B. Junior 16, coxed: Pres, Cork.

Pair – Under-23: CRCC.

Sculling, Quadruple – U-23: CRCC. Jun 16, coxed: Skibbereen CS.

Double – U-23: St Francis. Jun 16: St Coleman’s.

Single – Under-23: St Francis (J Dorney). U-16: St Vincent’s (T Orlic)

Women

Eight – U-23: St Brigid’s, Killarney. Jun 16: Coleraine GS.

Four – U-23: Regina Mundi. Jun 16, coxed: Coleraine GS.

Pair – U-23: Col Iognáid.

Sculling, Quadruple – U-23: St Brigid’s. Jun 16, coxed: Laurel Hill A.

Double – U-23: St Brigid’s B. Jun 16: St Leo’s.

Single – U-23: Coleraine GS (M Curry) 6:25. Jun 16: Laurel Hill (N Kiely).

Published in Rowing

#RNLI - RNLI lifeguards on the Causeway Coast helped to bring a sand dune fire under control at the weekend.

Lifeguards Jenny Thompson, Liam Mullan, James Walton and Jordan Burns were patrolling Benone Strand near Coleraine on Saturday afternoon (16 May) when, shortly after 3pm, they spotted smoke emerging from the sand dunes as they were preparing to enter the water to do some training.

One lifeguard went to investigate the incident some 400m from the rear of the lifeguard hut and observed a large fire which was spreading fast due to a strong easterly wind.

The lifeguards contacted the Northern Ireland Fire and Rescue Service before going to the scene themselves and bringing the fire under control within 10 minutes using fire extinguishers and shovels.

While continuing to maintain an operational and safe beach, the lifeguards ensured that no one was in any danger.

The lifeguards were assisted by staff from the nearby Benone tourist complex who provided the extinguishers, the beach rangers and some members of the Order of Malta who had been providing medical cover for a half marathon which had just finished on the beach.

RNLI senior lifeguard Liam Mullan explained: "The strong easterly wind was a big factor on how fast the fire was growing and how hot it was burning. Thankfully once on scene, we were able to bring the fire under control in about 10 minutes.

"Everyone reacted quickly and worked together using the water to contain the fire to stop it traveling with the wind. We then worked from behind the blaze using the wind to keep the smoke away from us. Using shovels, we brought the flames under control."

Speaking following the incident, Tim Doran, RNLI lifeguard supervisor, said: "While the primary role of a lifeguard is ensuring people’s safety in the water, they also have a duty of care for all members of the public when on land too.

"RNLI lifeguards have a good knowledge of beach access and the surrounding areas and we would encourage any concerned member of the public who comes across such fires to raise the alarm with the lifeguards on patrol who can respond and alert their colleagues in the fire service."

Published in Coastal Notes
Page 1 of 2

Howth Yacht Club information

Howth Yacht Club is the largest members sailing club in Ireland, with over 1,700 members. The club welcomes inquiries about membership - see top of this page for contact details.

Howth Yacht Club (HYC) is 125 years old. It operates from its award-winning building overlooking Howth Harbour that houses office, bar, dining, and changing facilities. Apart from the Clubhouse, HYC has a 250-berth marina, two cranes and a boat storage area. In addition. its moorings in the harbour are serviced by launch.

The Club employs up to 31 staff during the summer and is the largest employer in Howth village and has a turnover of €2.2m.

HYC normally provides an annual programme of club racing on a year-round basis as well as hosting a full calendar of International, National and Regional competitive events. It operates a fleet of two large committee boats, 9 RIBs, 5 J80 Sportboats, a J24 and a variety of sailing dinghies that are available for members and training. The Club is also growing its commercial activities afloat using its QUEST sail and power boat training operation while ashore it hosts a wide range of functions each year, including conferences, weddings, parties and the like.

Howth Yacht Club originated as Howth Sailing Club in 1895. In 1968 Howth Sailing Club combined with Howth Motor Yacht Club, which had operated from the West Pier since 1935, to form Howth Yacht Club. The new clubhouse was opened in 1987 with further extensions carried out and more planned for the future including dredging and expanded marina facilities.

HYC caters for sailors of all ages and run sailing courses throughout the year as part of being an Irish Sailing accredited training facility with its own sailing school.

The club has a fully serviced marina with berthing for 250 yachts and HYC is delighted to be able to welcome visitors to this famous and scenic area of Dublin.

New applications for membership are always welcome

Howth Yacht Club FAQs

Howth Yacht Club is one of the most storied in Ireland — celebrating its 125th anniversary in 2020 — and has an active club sailing and racing scene to rival those of the Dun Laoghaire Waterfront Clubs on the other side of Dublin Bay.

Howth Yacht Club is based at the harbour of Howth, a suburban coastal village in north Co Dublin on the northern side of the Howth Head peninsula. The village is around 13km east-north-east of Dublin city centre and has a population of some 8,200.

Howth Yacht Club was founded as Howth Sailing Club in 1895. Howth Sailing Club later combined with Howth Motor Yacht Club, which had operated from the village’s West Pier since 1935, to form Howth Yacht Club.

The club organises and runs sailing events and courses for members and visitors all throughout the year and has very active keelboat and dinghy racing fleets. In addition, Howth Yacht Club prides itself as being a world-class international sailing event venue and hosts many National, European and World Championships as part of its busy annual sailing schedule.

As of November 2020, the Commodore of the Royal St George Yacht Club is Ian Byrne, with Paddy Judge as Vice-Commodore (Clubhouse and Administration). The club has two Rear-Commodores, Neil Murphy for Sailing and Sara Lacy for Junior Sailing, Training & Development.

Howth Yacht Club says it has one of the largest sailing memberships in Ireland and the UK; an exact number could not be confirmed as of November 2020.

Howth Yacht Club’s burgee is a vertical-banded pennant of red, white and red with a red anchor at its centre. The club’s ensign has a blue-grey field with the Irish tricolour in its top left corner and red anchor towards the bottom right corner.

The club organises and runs sailing events and courses for members and visitors all throughout the year and has very active keelboat and dinghy racing fleets. In addition, Howth Yacht Club prides itself as being a world-class international sailing event venue and hosts many National, European and World Championships as part of its busy annual sailing schedule.

Yes, Howth Yacht Club has an active junior section.

Yes, Howth Yacht Club hosts sailing and powerboat training for adults, juniors and corporate sailing under the Quest Howth brand.

Among its active keelboat and dinghy fleets, Howth Yacht Club is famous for being the home of the world’s oldest one-design racing keelboat class, the Howth Seventeen Footer. This still-thriving class of boat was designed by Walter Herbert Boyd in 1897 to be sailed in the local waters off Howth. The original five ‘gaff-rigged topsail’ boats that came to the harbour in the spring of 1898 are still raced hard from April until November every year along with the other 13 historical boats of this class.

Yes, Howth Yacht Club has a fleet of five J80 keelboats for charter by members for training, racing, organised events and day sailing.

The current modern clubhouse was the product of a design competition that was run in conjunction with the Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland in 1983. The winning design by architects Vincent Fitzgerald and Reg Chandler was built and completed in March 1987. Further extensions have since been made to the building, grounds and its own secure 250-berth marina.

Yes, the Howth Yacht Club clubhouse offers a full bar and lounge, snug bar and coffee bar as well as a 180-seat dining room. Currently, the bar is closed due to Covid-19 restrictions. Catering remains available on weekends, take-home and delivery menus for Saturday night tapas and Sunday lunch.

The Howth Yacht Club office is open weekdays from 9am to 5pm. Contact the club for current restaurant opening hours at [email protected] or phone 01 832 0606.

Yes — when hosting sailing events, club racing, coaching and sailing courses, entertaining guests and running evening entertainment, tuition and talks, the club caters for all sorts of corporate, family and social occasions with a wide range of meeting, event and function rooms. For enquiries contact [email protected] or phone 01 832 2141.

Howth Yacht Club has various categories of membership, each affording the opportunity to avail of all the facilities at one of Ireland’s finest sailing clubs.

No — members can join active crews taking part in club keelboat and open sailing events, not to mention Pay & Sail J80 racing, charter sailing and more.

Fees range from €190 to €885 for ordinary members.
Memberships are renewed annually.

©Afloat 2020