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The Royal Cork Yacht Club have welcomed the appointment of club member Stephen O’Shaughnessy as racing manager at Irish Sailing.

The Cork city native has extensive sailing experience, from the Mirror dinghies of his youth to the the ILCA7 team racing in the Firefly, not to mention keelboat racing both inshore in Dublin Bay and offshore.

Today he’s a fixture of the National 18 dinghy fleet in Cork Harbour and still regularly sails keelboats.

In his new role, O’Shaughnessy will support all aspects of competitive racing across Ireland — local, national and international.

Published in Royal Cork YC
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The Royal Cork Yacht Club is bringing back mixed dinghy racing on Wednesdays this September.

Following the return of the mixed dinghy fleet earlier this year, as previously reported on Afloat.ie, the club is now looking to expand further beyond the 29ers, 420s and National 18s to welcome any mixed dinghy boat — raced by competent helms and crews — to join the PY racing format for the new September league coordinated by Andy Jenkins.

Royal Cork’s Read Admiral for dinghies, Maurice Collins tells Afloat.ie that the initiative is part of his overall strategy to reinvigorate double-handed sailing at the club.

Racers of double-handed boats such as Topaz, Mirror, RS200, Magno, RS400 and Fireball are actively encouraged to join — and single-handers are more than welcome too.

For more details see the RCYC website HERE.

Published in Royal Cork YC
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After the high winds of Saturday’s opening day of the Royal Cork Yacht Club 'At Home' in Crosshaven, the second day made for a welcome change, with a flat sea and less wind.

Between cruisers and dinghies, the RCYC had 80 boats racing over the weekend in their annual ‘At Home’ regatta in Cork Harbour.

Saturday’s high winds and choppy waters made a testing day for cruisers and dinghies. Cruisers raced between the outer and inner harbours, registering up to 22 knots of wind gusts.

In the two races on Saturday, some boats reefed mainsails to manage the conditions. Others flew spinnakers, with a few challenging incidents.

In the cruiser classes, IRC Spin Division was won by Fiona Young’s ‘North Star.’

The IRC Spinnaker Division of Royal Cork Yacht Club's 'At Home Regatta' was won by Fiona Young’s Albin Express ‘North Star' Photo: Bob BatemanThe IRC Spinnaker Division of Royal Cork Yacht Club's 'At Home Regatta' was won by Fiona Young’s Albin Express ‘North Star' Photo: Bob Bateman

Michael McCann’s ‘Don’t Dilly Dally’ second. David Dwyer’s ‘Swuzzlebubble’ third.

Michael McCann’s Etchells 22 ‘Don’t Dilly Dally’ competing in the IRC Spinnaker Division of Royal Cork Yacht Club's 'At Home Regatta' Photo: Bob BatemanMichael McCann’s Etchells 22 ‘Don’t Dilly Dally’ competing in the IRC Spinnaker Division of Royal Cork Yacht Club's 'At Home Regatta' Photo: Bob Bateman

Ria Lyden’s ‘Ellida’ won ECHO Spin with North Star second and ‘T Bone’ (Tom Durcan/Clive O’Shea) third.

Ria Lyden’s X332 ‘Ellida’ won the ECHO Spinnaker Division of Royal Cork Yacht Club's 'At Home Regatta' Photo: Bob BatemanRia Lyden’s X332 ‘Ellida’ won the ECHO Spinnaker Division of Royal Cork Yacht Club's 'At Home Regatta' Photo: Bob Bateman

Whitesail Division 1 IRC winner was Ian Hickey’s ‘Cavatina.’ Kieran O’Brien’s ‘Magnet’ second. ‘BigMc’ (McGrath Family) third. ‘Cavatina’ also won the ECHO handicap, with Mike Ryder’s ‘Freya’ second and ‘BigMc’ third.

Kieran O’Brien’s ‘Magnet’ was second in Whitesail Division 1 IRC of Royal Cork Yacht Club's 'At Home Regatta' Photo: Bob BatemanKieran O’Brien’s ‘Magnet’ was second in Whitesail Division 1 IRC of Royal Cork Yacht Club's 'At Home Regatta' Photo: Bob Bateman

Whitesail Division 2 winner in both IRC and ECHO was the MacSweeney Family’s ‘Scribbler’. Second in the ECHO handicap was Rob Foster’s ‘Clodagh’ and third was Eugene O’Loughlin’s ‘Kerensa’.

In the dinghy fleets, the Laser ‘passage race’ from Blackrock to Crosshaven on Saturday was a tough challenge for the single-handers. The ILCA 6 winner was Joe O’Sullivan, with Robert Jeffreys second and Eve McCarthy third. Laser 4 fleet winner was Craig O’Neill, with Liam Duggan second and Tommy Hiras third. The ILCA 7 winner was Richard McGlade. Liam Duggan won ILCA 4 in Sunday's racing, with Craig O’Neill second and Eve McCarthy third.

Fast sailing in a 29er dinghy during Royal Cork Yacht Club's 'At Home Regatta' was won by Fiona Young’s Albin Express ‘North Star' Photo: Bob BatemanFast sailing in a 29er dinghy during Royal Cork Yacht Club's 'At Home Regatta' Photo: Bob Bateman

Fevas raced from Monkstown to Crosshaven on Sunday, won by Cathal and Ruadhan Jackson, second Harry Coole and Chris Granby, and third Aifric Barry and Florence Dennehy.

Racing on the Curlane Bank, the Toppers winner was Lucy Moynan, second Kate Dean and third Ruby Foley. Optimists Class winner was Hugh O’Neill, second Charlie McKibben and third Ayda Bruen.

The crew of the National 18 Ball 'n' Chain is hit by a gust going downwind during Royal Cork Yacht Club's 'At Home Regatta' was won by Fiona Young’s Albin Express ‘North Star' Photo: Bob BatemanThe crew of the National 18 Ball 'n' Chain is hit by a gust going downwind during Royal Cork Yacht Club's 'At Home Regatta' Photo: Bob Bateman

National 18s Class was won by Charles Dwyer and crew sailing ‘Nacho Boat’. Second ‘ Aquadisiacs,’ Colin Chapman and crew. Third ‘Peaky Blinders,’ Ronan Walsh and crew.

Bob Bateman's RCYC 'At Home 2023' Photo Gallery (Day One)

Published in Royal Cork YC

Breezy conditions which had a strong northwesterly at times tested the fleets in action in the first day of this weekend’s Royal Cork Yacht Club ‘At Home’ regatta on Saturday (26 August).

Our own Bob Bateman reports that the proposed format change that would have seen some fleets racing from Blackrock did not happen, with ILCAs and Toppers spotted returning to the club.

The National 18 class had a sprint series which consisted of three races on the Curlane Bank, where they were joined by mixed dinghies, two 29ers, a few 420s and an RS 200.

Clear leader on the day was Nacho Boat, helmed by Charles Dwyer, with three bullets. Second and third on the leaderboard respectively are Aquadisiacs (helmed by Colin Chapman) and Peaky Blinders (Ronan Walsh), both on 10 nett points.

Bob Bateman's RCYC 'At Home' 2023 Photo Gallery 

Published in Royal Cork YC
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Due to the poor weather on the South Coast at present, the Royal Cork Yacht Club has cancelled this evening’s (Thursday 6 July) opening race in the Thursday night July League for cruisers.

Published in Royal Cork YC
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Royal Cork Yacht Club members Christian Zugel and wife Sonia Rohan took line honours in Cowes on Saturday (1 July) in this year’s Round the Island Race.

RCYC’s former Olympian Tom McWilliam also featured among the crew of their Volvo 70, Tschüss 2, which was the first monohull to finish in Saturday’s race — and was awarded the Gold Roman Bowl for first place under IRC.

The performance only adds to the pedigree of the boat, which won the 2019 Rolex Fastnet Race as Wizard and the Volvo Ocean Race 2011-12 as Groupama.

The weather conditions could not have been better for Tschüss 2 — a strong breeze throughout the day and from the west enabling a spinnaker run from just before the Needles right the way to Bembridge.

Tschüss 2’s crew celebrate their line honours and award of the Gold Roman Bowl on arrival in Cowes | Credit: Royal Cork Yacht Club/FacebookTschüss 2’s crew celebrate their line honours and award of the Gold Roman Bowl on arrival in Cowes | Credit: Royal Cork Yacht Club/Facebook

Tschüss 2 completed the course in four hours, 11 minutes and 18 seconds with the mini maxi Notorious crossing the line in second place finishing in four hours, 19 minutes and four seconds.

Christian Zugel, owner and skipper of Tschüss 2 said: “We are delighted with our race performance today and securing line honours is fantastic — what better way to start a new programme on our new boat! Great sailing, great competition and a fantastic welcome from the Island Sailing Club.”

Tschüss 2 had been training for more than a week on the Solent and a practice race around the Isle of Wight but they did it clockwise — like the original America’s Cup route in 1851.

The tactician onboard, Neal McDonald said: “I’ve competed in the race a number of times and can say it was perfect conditions for Tschüss 2 today. It’s such an iconic race in a wonderful setting.”

Published in Royal Cork YC

The Winter League for cruisers at the Royal Cork Yacht Club in Cork Harbour will be for White Sails.

There will be six races, starting on Sunday, November 6 and concluding on Sunday, December 11, according to the Notice of Race issued by the club.

“All-in White Sail, results under IRC and ECHO, with the overall trophy awarded under IRC. One race scheduled each day, weather dependent,” the Notice says. “Daily prizes for 1st and 2nd only. Series prizes for 1st, 2nd and 3rd.

The League will be sponsored by O’Leary Insurances and is an open event, to include visiting boats.

Entry forms must be completed and are available on the RCYC website

Published in Royal Cork YC

The Royal Cork Yacht Club will host an evening of fine dining on Saturday 19 November with all proceeds going to support the club’s Paris 2024 Olympic 49er campaigners Séafra Guilfoyle and Johnny Durcan.

Enjoy a six-course meal prepared by renowned chefs including Victor Franca, head chef at Nua Asador; Nascimento Nunes, head chef at Paladar Restaurant and recently The Barn Restaurant; Shauan Murphy, pastry chef at the Michelin-star The Oak Room at Adare Manor; and Leticia Miranda, chef at the Michelin-star Mae Restaurant.

Dinner is at 8pm on the night with a drinks reception from 7pm. The dress code is smart. Places at €300 per person can be booked on the Royal Cork YC website HERE.

Published in Royal Cork YC

Evening cruiser-racing concluded in Cork Harbour with the final race of the August/September Whitesails League at the RCYC.

Evening cruiser and dinghy racing has also finished at Cove SC. Monkstown Bay Sailing Club dinghy racing is moving from evenings to Saturdays for September.

The June/July and August/September Friday whitesail leagues at the RCYC were both won by SCRIBBLER (Tom and Cormac MacSweeney). The dual success of the Sigma 33 was helmed respectively by the young brothers Oisin (June/July) and Rowan (August/September). They are also both Laser sailors at the RCYC.

Second in August/September was John O’Connor and John Hanley’s Impala FAST BUCK, and third Clive Doherty’s PHAETON. Second in the June/July League was Peter Webster’s, THISTLE and third was FAST BUCK.

Bob Bateman's RCYC Whitesails League and Prizegiving 2022 Photo Gallery

Published in Royal Cork YC

At the Royal Cork Yacht Club in Crosshaven, the August/September evening league has had three races and is being led in the Spinnaker Division under both IRC and ECHO handicaps by Ria Lyden’s X332 Ellida.

She is followed under both handicap systems, IRC and ECHO, by Denis Byrne’s Trapper, Cracker and Wan and Eric Waterman’s Saxon. In IRC Ellida has nine points, Cracker 11 and Saxon Senator 12. Close racing there.

In ECHO Ellida leads on six points, with Cracker and Saxon Senator both on 11. Paul O’Shea’s Sun Odyssey, Elegance, leads the whitesails fleet in the league series in both IRC and ECHO, followed by Kieran O’Brien’s Magnet and John O’Connor’s Fast Buck in IRC. Derry Good’s Exhale is second in ECHO, with Fast
Buck third.

Friday Whitesails league under IHS handicapping

The Friday Whitesails league which is sailed under IHS handicapping has also had three races and is being led by the Sigma 33 Scribbler (Tom and Cormac
MacSweeney), with Fast Buck second and Clive Doherty’s Phaeton third.

Published in Royal Cork YC
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Howth Yacht Club information

Howth Yacht Club is the largest members sailing club in Ireland, with over 1,700 members. The club welcomes inquiries about membership - see top of this page for contact details.

Howth Yacht Club (HYC) is 125 years old. It operates from its award-winning building overlooking Howth Harbour that houses office, bar, dining, and changing facilities. Apart from the Clubhouse, HYC has a 250-berth marina, two cranes and a boat storage area. In addition. its moorings in the harbour are serviced by launch.

The Club employs up to 31 staff during the summer and is the largest employer in Howth village and has a turnover of €2.2m.

HYC normally provides an annual programme of club racing on a year-round basis as well as hosting a full calendar of International, National and Regional competitive events. It operates a fleet of two large committee boats, 9 RIBs, 5 J80 Sportboats, a J24 and a variety of sailing dinghies that are available for members and training. The Club is also growing its commercial activities afloat using its QUEST sail and power boat training operation while ashore it hosts a wide range of functions each year, including conferences, weddings, parties and the like.

Howth Yacht Club originated as Howth Sailing Club in 1895. In 1968 Howth Sailing Club combined with Howth Motor Yacht Club, which had operated from the West Pier since 1935, to form Howth Yacht Club. The new clubhouse was opened in 1987 with further extensions carried out and more planned for the future including dredging and expanded marina facilities.

HYC caters for sailors of all ages and run sailing courses throughout the year as part of being an Irish Sailing accredited training facility with its own sailing school.

The club has a fully serviced marina with berthing for 250 yachts and HYC is delighted to be able to welcome visitors to this famous and scenic area of Dublin.

New applications for membership are always welcome

Howth Yacht Club FAQs

Howth Yacht Club is one of the most storied in Ireland — celebrating its 125th anniversary in 2020 — and has an active club sailing and racing scene to rival those of the Dun Laoghaire Waterfront Clubs on the other side of Dublin Bay.

Howth Yacht Club is based at the harbour of Howth, a suburban coastal village in north Co Dublin on the northern side of the Howth Head peninsula. The village is around 13km east-north-east of Dublin city centre and has a population of some 8,200.

Howth Yacht Club was founded as Howth Sailing Club in 1895. Howth Sailing Club later combined with Howth Motor Yacht Club, which had operated from the village’s West Pier since 1935, to form Howth Yacht Club.

The club organises and runs sailing events and courses for members and visitors all throughout the year and has very active keelboat and dinghy racing fleets. In addition, Howth Yacht Club prides itself as being a world-class international sailing event venue and hosts many National, European and World Championships as part of its busy annual sailing schedule.

As of November 2020, the Commodore of the Royal St George Yacht Club is Ian Byrne, with Paddy Judge as Vice-Commodore (Clubhouse and Administration). The club has two Rear-Commodores, Neil Murphy for Sailing and Sara Lacy for Junior Sailing, Training & Development.

Howth Yacht Club says it has one of the largest sailing memberships in Ireland and the UK; an exact number could not be confirmed as of November 2020.

Howth Yacht Club’s burgee is a vertical-banded pennant of red, white and red with a red anchor at its centre. The club’s ensign has a blue-grey field with the Irish tricolour in its top left corner and red anchor towards the bottom right corner.

The club organises and runs sailing events and courses for members and visitors all throughout the year and has very active keelboat and dinghy racing fleets. In addition, Howth Yacht Club prides itself as being a world-class international sailing event venue and hosts many National, European and World Championships as part of its busy annual sailing schedule.

Yes, Howth Yacht Club has an active junior section.

Yes, Howth Yacht Club hosts sailing and powerboat training for adults, juniors and corporate sailing under the Quest Howth brand.

Among its active keelboat and dinghy fleets, Howth Yacht Club is famous for being the home of the world’s oldest one-design racing keelboat class, the Howth Seventeen Footer. This still-thriving class of boat was designed by Walter Herbert Boyd in 1897 to be sailed in the local waters off Howth. The original five ‘gaff-rigged topsail’ boats that came to the harbour in the spring of 1898 are still raced hard from April until November every year along with the other 13 historical boats of this class.

Yes, Howth Yacht Club has a fleet of five J80 keelboats for charter by members for training, racing, organised events and day sailing.

The current modern clubhouse was the product of a design competition that was run in conjunction with the Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland in 1983. The winning design by architects Vincent Fitzgerald and Reg Chandler was built and completed in March 1987. Further extensions have since been made to the building, grounds and its own secure 250-berth marina.

Yes, the Howth Yacht Club clubhouse offers a full bar and lounge, snug bar and coffee bar as well as a 180-seat dining room. Currently, the bar is closed due to Covid-19 restrictions. Catering remains available on weekends, take-home and delivery menus for Saturday night tapas and Sunday lunch.

The Howth Yacht Club office is open weekdays from 9am to 5pm. Contact the club for current restaurant opening hours at [email protected] or phone 01 832 0606.

Yes — when hosting sailing events, club racing, coaching and sailing courses, entertaining guests and running evening entertainment, tuition and talks, the club caters for all sorts of corporate, family and social occasions with a wide range of meeting, event and function rooms. For enquiries contact [email protected] or phone 01 832 2141.

Howth Yacht Club has various categories of membership, each affording the opportunity to avail of all the facilities at one of Ireland’s finest sailing clubs.

No — members can join active crews taking part in club keelboat and open sailing events, not to mention Pay & Sail J80 racing, charter sailing and more.

Fees range from €190 to €885 for ordinary members.
Memberships are renewed annually.

©Afloat 2020