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Displaying items by tag: Dun Laoghaire Harbour

A Greystones County Wicklow-based challenge to row from Ireland to Iceland next Spring made a preliminary call into Dun Laoghaire Harbour last week.

Led by James Murray, the expedition aims to "safely get from Ireland to Iceland under human power alone. No motors, no sails".

The schedule is to set off from Dublin, Ireland in Spring 2021 and for different crew members to join for legs on the way to Iceland. 

As Murray explains on his website, row to iceland.com, "each team member has their own reasons for joining, but we all share an appreciation for the beauty of the places in-between and that seemingly extraordinary thing are possible". 

Departing Dublin in April, the 3000km route will follow up Ireland's east coast before crossing to Scotland.

Following the Scottish coast, the plan is for the rowing boat to stop into fjords and towns along the way. 

The plan then is to cross to the Orkney Islands and Shetland Islands before preparing for the big push to the Faroe Islands and then Iceland.

The trip is expected to take three to six months

Murray also asks on the campaign website that if you have experience with part of this route "we'd love to hear from you to help inform our plans".

Published in Greystones Harbour

This inquisitive Dublin Bay young seal made his way up the steps of Dun Laoghaire's East Pier much to the surprise of weekend harbour strollers. 

Harbour and grey seals have a year-round presence at Dun Laoghaire and Dublin Bay in general. 

The seals often haul-out on man-made structures and tolerate considerable human activity but it's unusual to see a pup on its own on the East Pier.

Such sites are used during breeding, moulting, resting between foraging trips in the open sea, and to engage in social activity.

Under the Wildlife Acts 1976 to 2018, cetaceans and seals are protected species.

The Irish Sea Sanctuary says if you encounter seals ashore "the GOLDEN RULE…..is give them space and observe from a distance".

Seals and getting to the truth about shooting them was the subject of a recent podcast by Afloat's Tom MacSweeney here.

Published in Marine Wildlife

Preparations for Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta 2021 next July on Dublin Bay are off to a flying start with nine of the expected 22 racing classes already declaring regional or national championships to be held as part of the biennial sailing festival.

It has been confirmed that Dragons will race for national honours and so will Beneteau 211s, Beneteau 31.7s and Shipmans.

As regular Afloat readers will know, in order to facilitate social distancing and be Covid-19 compliant, a new regatta format will comprise a One Design Championship (2nd – 4th July 2021) specifically tailored for sailors in the one-design keelboat and dinghy classes. This is to be followed by an Open Cruiser Championship (8th – 11th July 2021) catering for the full range of Cruiser Handicap classes. 

The Dublin Bay based Shipman keelboat class will sail for national championship honours as part of Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta 2021The Dublin Bay-based Shipman keelboat class will sail for national championship honours as part of Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta 2021 Photo: Afloat

The special changes, announced in September, have been met with a strong seal of approval from competitors with the following early adopters: 

  • Beneteau 211 National Championships
  • Beneteau 31.7 – National Championships
  • Shipman – National Championships
  • GP14 – Leinster Championships
  • Fireball Leinster Championships
  • Dragon – Irish National Championship
  • SB20 Western Championships
  • RS200 Leinster Championships
  • RS400 Leinster Championship

The Beneteau 211s will also race for National Championship honours Photo: AfloatThe Beneteau 211s will also race for National Championship honours Photo: Afloat

Royal Dee ISORA Championships

In addition, in the cruiser classes,  the Royal Dee Irish Sea Offshore Championship will be held as part of VDLR 2021. These offshore races will be held together with the Lyver Trophy Race from Liverpool to Dun Laoghaire on Friday 1st July 2021, to make it a highlight of next year's Irish Sea Offshore (ISORA) season. 

ISORA racing will be incorporated into Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta 2021ISORA racing will be incorporated into Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta 2021

It's a satisfying early result for the VDLR Committee under Chairman Don O'Dowd who meets again with his committee tonight to finalise the Notice of Race document due for release shortly. 

Meeting the COVID-19 challenges in 2021

Dun Laoghaire is unique in being able operate in this pandemic because of the extensive area within the harbour site and facilities provided by the waterfront clubs and organisations. The Regatta will utilise the full infrastructure of Dun Laoghaire Harbour venue to the best advantage and bring certainty to a calendar that has been hugely dictated by Covid-19 and the constraints imposed due to social distancing.

Irish WASZP youth sailor Charlie Cullen was pipped by an Australian Olympic sailor for first prize in last weekend's climax of the Global GPS Racing Dinghy Series. 

The Dun Laoghaire Harbour skiff sailor was in pole position to win the first prize of two spectator tickets to a Sail GP event and a ride on an F50 catamaran but canny Australian Brad Devine pipped him to the post right on the event deadline.

The first-year Trinity College Dublin Engineering student made a real stab of juggling his studies and the big waves on Dublin Bay to try and win the world challenge and very nearly did.

More here

It’s no secret that the Dun Laoghaire Harbour Laser fleet is in good shape. Anybody strolling the piers or looking out on club forecourts will have seen that for themselves. DBSC (Dublin Bay Sailing Club) in 2020 drew a huge entry of 92 Laser 4.7s, Radials and Standards, with regular turnouts of 60-70 boats, with sailors of all ages. Likewise, numerous pods go out training once or twice a week, sharpening race skills and getting newer or returning sailors up to scratch for the real deal.

Everybody in this local Laser community just gets on with it in a great spirit of co-operation and camaraderie. We will get the sailors on the water for racing, but that’s where experienced DBSC Race Officer Suzanne McGarry steps in, aided by a wonderful flagship team. DBSC delivered a wonderful programme from late June to mid September, despite all the challenges of this annus horribilis. Until Level 3 kicked in, organizers squeezed in 24 great Saturday Laser races, as well as a comprehensive Tuesday night series. The funny thing now as we all reflect is that many of us can’t remember a more enjoyable sailing season, even with no showers, outdoor changing at times and all the very necessary protocols. I suppose it was all about local sailing again and people got into a really nice rhythm, uninterrupted by regattas, Championships or foreign holidays! The class captains for the last six years were, therefore, delighted to meet Suzanne at the RStGYC yesterday to present a token of our appreciation for her and the whole team. She went to great lengths to explain about the importance and dedication of everybody involved in the race management team and it’s striking so many have worked together for so many years.

It was in 2015 that Lasers really came out from the shadows in Dun Laoghaire after the fleet had dwindled to 3 or 4 stalwarts, by then subsumed into the Mixed PY division. DBSC had the foresight to listen, giving us our own class again, more shorter races and low entry fees (especially for Under 25s). We were immediately up over 30 boats by 2015 and we’ve basically added 10 regular racers each season since then, even more this year with the push into solo sailing.

Tuesday DBSC night Laser racing in 2020 Photo: Rob WalkerTuesday DBSC night Laser racing in 2020 Photo: Rob Walker

Excellent race management has been a massive contribution to the growth of the class. We estimate that Suzanne has presided over more than 80% of the hundreds of races staged in the last six years. Start lines are square, beats and runs are true and results are gathered efficiently. But remember, we’re talking about very tricky conditions here. Racing is within the shifty confines of our wonderful harbour, or outside in Scotsman’s Bay, often in a fickle evening breeze, with a strong tide. Despite being in that characteristic, steely “zone” up on the foredeck, Suzanne is very approachable and receptive to feedback onshore. Indeed, this season, after only a few races, she quickly introduced an innovative tweak to the starting procedure, to give the big Radial fleet more time to digest course changes between races. Incidentally, the 53 boat Laser Radial entry is almost definitely the largest local racing Radial fleet in the world, just now.

Laser thank you trophy

The 2020 season was an amazing effort by all DBSC Officers and volunteers. Suzanne and her team got dinghies out competing on June 30th as Afloat reported here. This was at the earliest possible opportunity given government guidelines and well before DBSC keelboat racing started.

Undoubtedly, the Laser turnout that day of 60 boats was the biggest one-design racing staged anywhere in Ireland since the Pandemic began. We hope we encouraged others up and down the country. 

From all Dun Laoghaire Laser sailors, thank you, Suzanne and colleagues, for all your support and service down the years.

Below are the names of the core people who help Suzanne and keep the show on the road;

Barbara Conway. Ros Bremner. Caroline Liddy. Brendan Dalton, Declan Traynor, Dara Traynor, James Traynor, Dave Coleman, Liz Aylmer, Sharon Moylan, Ian Mathews, Ben Mulligan, Niki Wheatley, Susan Spain, Caitriona O’Brien Michael Costelloe and Joanne Sheehan

The Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI all-weather lifeboat was launched this afternoon (Saturday 10 October) following a request from the Irish Coast Guard to assist four people on board a 36ft yacht, which had reported having mechanical issues while anchored just off Hawks Cliff in Dalkey.

The all-weather lifeboat was launched at 2:25 pm under Coxswain Mark McGibney with six crew members onboard and made its way to the scene arriving at 2:35 pm. The all-weather lifeboat took the vessel in tow and made its way back to Dun Laoghaire Harbour. While in tow it was reported that the vessel was taking on a significant amount of water and the issue found was resolved before continuing. Arriving in Dun Laoghaire Harbour the lifeboat crew used the lifeboats on board salvage pump to remove the excess water from the yacht before returning to the lifeboat station.

All onboard were wearing lifejackets and no medical attention was required.

Weather conditions at the time were described as good with a light wind and good visibility.

Speaking following the call out, Mark McGibney, Dun Laoghaire RNLI lifeboat Coxswain said: ‘The casualties did the correct thing today by calling for help and keeping themselves safely at anchor until our crew arrived on scene, what happened can happen to anyone and I would like to take this opportunity to remind everybody to make sure that their vessel engines and safety equipment are checked and in working order before taking to the water.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Gardaí are investigating an incident where a body was recovered offshore from Dun Laoghaire Harbour, on Dublin Bay yesterday, (Friday, 9th October). 

The Naval Service's coastal patrol vessel LÉ Ciara (P42) assisted with the recovery of the body.

The body of the deceased was taken to the local mortuary and, according to a Navy spokeswoman, the incident is now a matter for an Garda Siochana.

Enquiries are ongoing and there is no further information at this time, according to a Garda spokeswoman.

As Afloat reported yesterday, LE Ciara arrived into Dun Laoghaire Harbour yesterday at lunch-time, berthed overnight at number four berth and departed this morning (Saturday, October 10th).

Local sources told Afloat the body was of a female and was recovered well offshore but this was not confirmed.

Published in Dublin Bay

Dun Laoghaire Harbour WASZP sailor Charlie Cullen is in pole position to win the first prize of two spectator tickets to a Sail GP event and a ride on an F50 catamaran following his own foiling exploits in the class’s global GPS racing series.

WASZP sailors, including Cullen, have been competing over an event window from September 14th – October 12th and the Dublin Bay teenager is currently top of the rankings with just three days left to sail.

The beauty of this initiative by WASZP is that sailors from every corner of the globe can race against each other and continue to compare themselves against the best. This, say the promoters, is using the best aspects from windsurfing and kitesurfing and integrating it into the more traditional racing/event formats. 

Waszp Sailor Charlie Cullen with his top speeds recorded by GPSWaszp Sailor Charlie Cullen with his top speeds recorded by GPS

Because of the nature of the event, sailors are not scored just on the fastest speed. The sailors are scored on three categories:

  • Average top speed
  • Best 250m run
  • Total distance sailed in 1/2 an hour (calculated off your average 1/2 hour speed.)

Charlie's winning runs clocked the following: 

  • Sailed a total distance of 52km
  • Max 2sec at 24.53 knots.
  • Half hour average speed of 16.01 knots

Will this be the winning time by the deadline?

More details on his rise to the top here

Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI was requested to launch by the Irish Coast Guard at 5:57 pm this evening (Thursday 17 September) after a member of the public reported a swimmer who appeared to be in difficulty off Blackrock

The inshore lifeboat was launched swiftly at 6:00 pm by Helm Nathan Burke who had been at the lifeboat station doing routine equipment checks. A further two crew members Andrew Sykes and Ronan Adams arrived minutes later and with the lifeboat already in the water the crew headed for the reported location, arriving on scene at 6:05 pm.

On arrival, the crew quickly assessed the situation and swiftly pulled the person from the water. Without delay, the person was casualty care assessed and seen to have been in a hypothermic state and slipping in and out of consciousness. A decision was made to return the person to Sea Point Beach immediately, with the National Ambulance Service and Irish Coast Guard’s Rescue 116 helicopter en route to provide further medical assistance. With the help of Dun Laoghaire Irish Coast Guard Unit our crew handed the person to the National Ambulance Service, the person’s condition had started to improve on handover.

Weather conditions at the scene were described as sunny clear with a warm breeze and a choppy sea swell.

Speaking following the call out, Nathan Burke, Dun Laoghaire RNLI lifeboat Helm said: ‘The timing was crucial tonight and I’m very glad I was at the station when the call-out came in. The other two crew members arrived very quickly which ultimately resulted in a successful outcome. This evening showed that it is very important for swimmers not to overestimate their ability and underestimate the unseen currents and cold water that make swimming in the sea in Ireland more challenging’.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

While out on their first training exercise since COVID-19 restrictions were put in place in March, Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI yesterday evening (Monday 31 August) was requested by the Irish Coast Guard to respond to a kayaker who had capsized.

The all-weather lifeboat launched at 6:55 pm under Duty Coxswain David Branigan with seven crew on board and was carrying out routine training within the vicinity of Killiney Bay when they received an immediate tasking call. The crew quickly diverted course at 7:20 pm to search the area of coast between Dalkey and Colliemore Harbour.

The lifeboat used the tidal and wind direction as an indicator and located the two kayakers who had left Bullock Harbour together, one of which was in difficulty after capsizing and losing their paddle. The second kayaker helped the person in difficulty to right their kayak and assisted them until the lifeboat crew arrived on scene.

The casualty was transferred on board and casualty care assessed by the volunteer crew and deemed in good health and was then taken ashore at Dun Laoghaire lifeboat station rather than Bullock Harbour due to the mid-tide at the time. The other person involved made their way back to Bullock Harbour unassisted.

Dun Laoghaire Irish Coast Guard shore unit and the Irish Coast Guard helicopter Rescue 116 were also on scene.

Weather conditions at the were described as fresh with a southerly wind.

Speaking following the call out, David Branigan, Dun Laoghaire RNLI Duty lifeboat Coxswain said: ‘ This was our first training exercise since covid-19 restrictions were put in place, and by chance, a call from the Irish Coast Guard was received over the radio. Following a quick search of the area, we were very glad to find the kayakers. It was reassuring to find the person in difficulty had stayed with their kayak and bunched up with the second kayak, this made it much easier for us to find them. They also had a means of calling the Coast Guard for help which is very important. Our crew were very pleased with the outcome and happy to have safely returned the person to shore’.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Page 1 of 27

The home club of Laser Radial Olympic Silver medalist Annalise Murphy, the National Yacht Club is a lot more besides. It is also the spiritual home of the offshore sailing body ISORA, the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race and the biggest Flying Fifteen fleet in Ireland. Founded on a loyal membership, the National Yacht Club at the East Pier in Dun Laoghaire on Dublin Bay enjoys a family ethos and a strong fellowship in a relaxed atmosphere of support and friendship through sailing.

Bathing in the gentle waterfront ambience of Dun Laoghaire on the edge of South County Dublin, the National Yacht Club has graced the waters of the Irish Sea and far beyond for more than a century and in 2020 celebrates its sesquicentennial.  

The club is particularly active in dinghy and keelboat one-design racing and has hosted three World Championships in recent years including the Flying Fifteen Worlds in 2003, 2019 and the SB3 Worlds in 2008. The ISAF Youth Worlds was co-hosted with our neighbouring club the Royal St. George Yacht Club in 2012...

National Yacht Club Facilities

Facilities include a slipway directly accessing Dun Laoghaire Harbour, over eighty club moorings, platform parking, pontoons, fuelling, watering and crane-lifting ensure that the NYC is excellently equipped to cater for all the needs of the contemporary sailor. Berths with diesel, water, power and overnight facilities are available to cruising yachtsmen with shopping facilities being a short walk away. The club is active throughout the year with full dining and bar facilities and winter activities include bridge, snooker, quiz nights, wine tasting and special events.

National Yacht Club History

Although there are references to an active “club” prior to 1870, history records that the present clubhouse was erected in 1870 at a cost of £4,000 to a design by William Sterling and the Kingstown Royal Harbour Boat Club was registered with Lloyds in the same year. By 1872 the name had been changed to the Kingston Harbour Boat Club and this change was registered at Lloyds.

In 1881. the premises were purchased by a Captain Peacocke and others who formed a proprietary club called the Kingstown Harbour Yacht Club again registered at Lloyds. Some six years later in 1877 the building again changed hands being bought by a Mr Charles Barrington. and between 1877 and 1901 the club was very active and operated for a while as the “Absolute Club” although this change of name was never registered.

In 1901, the lease was purchased by three trustees who registered it as the Edward Yacht Club. In 1930 at a time when the Edward Yacht Club was relatively inactive, a committee including The Earl of Granard approached the trustees with a proposition to form the National Yacht Club. The Earl of Granard had been Commodore of the North Shannon Y.C. and was a senator in the W.T.Cosgrave government. An agreement was reached, the National Yacht Club was registered at Lloyds. The club burgee was created, red cross of Saint George with blue and white quarters being sky cloud, sea and surf. The Earl of Granard became the first Commodore.

In July of 1950, a warrant was issued to the National Yacht Club by the Government under the Merchant Shipping Act authorising members to hoist a club ensign in lieu of the National Flag. The new ensign to include a representation of the harp. This privilege is unique and specific to members of the National Yacht Club. Sterling’s design for the exterior of the club was a hybrid French Chateau and eighteenth century Garden Pavilion and today as a Class A restricted building it continues to provide elegant dining and bar facilities.

An early drawing of the building shows viewing balconies on the roof and the waterfront façade. Subsequent additions of platforms and a new slip to the seaward side and most recently the construction of new changing rooms, offices and boathouse provide state of the art facilities, capable of coping with major international and world championship events. The club provides a wide range of sailing facilities, from Junior training to family cruising, dinghy sailing to offshore racing and caters for most major classes of dinghies, one design keelboats, sports boats and cruiser racers. It provides training facilities within the ISA Youth Sailing Scheme and National Power Boat Schemes.

Past Commodores

1931 – 42 Earl of Granard 1942 – 45 T.J. Hamilton 1945 – 47 P.M. Purcell 1947 – 50 J.J. O’Leary 1950 – 55 A.A. Murphy 1955 – 60 J.J. O’Leary 1960 – 64 F. Lemass 1964 – 69 J.C. McConnell 1969 – 72 P.J. Johnston 1972 – 74 L. Boyd 1974 – 76 F.C. Winkelmann 1976 – 79 P.A. Browne 1979 – 83 W.A. Maguire 1983 – 87 F.J. Cooney 1987 – 88 J.J. Byrne 1988 – 91 M.F. Muldoon 1991 – 94 B.D. Barry 1994 – 97 M.P.B. Horgan 1997 – 00 B. MacNeaney 2000 – 02 I.E. Kiernan 2002 – 05 C.N.I. Moore 2005 – 08 C.J. Murphy 2008 – 11 P.D. Ryan 2011 – P. Barrington 2011-2014 Larry Power 2014-2017 Ronan Beirne 2017 – 2019

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