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Displaying items by tag: Limerick

#cityone – A new Irish sailing dinghy design, the LC1, is under construction in Limerick which promoters say will have a 'lively performance but at the same time, the relatively broad beam and inherent stability should mean it is not difficult for the inexperienced.

The City One Limerick Dinghy from the AK. Ilen Company is designed for use on the Shannon as it passes through the city and opens into estuary on its way to the Atlantic. The LC1's launch will tie in with celebrations of Limerick's 2014 City of Culture celebrtations.

The design of the boat is from the drawing board of Theo Rye.

The keel of the LC1 is laid and according to the latest progress reports the keel of the prototype is laid, and within the next few weeks, some of the world's 'finest craftsmen' from New Zealand, North America and elsewhere will be in the Ilen Boat Building School working in conjunction with Limerick's boatmen on the project.

The design marries traditional and modern design elements. Most modern dinghies are factory made in fiberglass or plastic. The LC1's hull is specifically for relatively simple construction in timber and plywood with a hard chine and constant radius underside.

Many thousands of dinghies of this type were built in the 1950s and 60s, often by amateurs at home. The relative simplicity of the design means no especially difficult boatbuilding skills will be necessary, so the satisfaction of construction is brought into the reach of nearly anyone with enthusiasm and time. The pride of achievement in helping build a boat and then sailing it will excite and interest children and adults, and there are numerous benefits and educational opportunities associated with this process. The materials specified are reasonably cheap and easy to source.

The use of epoxy to coat the timber and fillet the ply together, and the painted finish, will help reduce the maintenance and upkeep often associated with wooden boats, and any repairs necessary should be simple to do as well. The design is also intended to quickly self-drain after righting from a capsize, a feature of many modern designs; "coming up dry" has the benefit of allowing the boats to be left safely on moorings afloat without covers if necessary.

The raked stem reflects that this design is not driven by a rating rule;the stem allows the bow to retain buoyancy when driven hard, and it often means a less abrupt stop in the event of a collision, too. That points to the intention that the boat should be user friendly both for novices as well as more experienced sailors.

In the right hands, the design should enable lively performance and keen racing; but at the same time, the relatively broad beam and
inherent stability should mean it is not difficult or intimidating for the inexperienced or less confident.

The hull shape is intended to be tolerant of crew weight, and allow crews of two, three or even four people, making it a design suitable for teaching sailing with an instructor on board. The high boom and "gnav" mean there is less likelihood of knocking heads with the boom or kicking-strap, and the clear Mylar sails enable good visibility.

The size of the jib is such that even relatively small crew members should find it easy to trim, and without a trapeze no special athleticism is required. The simple layout and lack of complexity in the rig should also mean rigging is quick and easy, helping get people onto the water rapidly and easily.

The Shannon river has always been central to the history and life of Limerick, and sailing right in the center of the city should reawaken an awareness of its fundamental marine and riverine dimension and perspective.

The unique topography of the area brings its own challenges: balancing the need for a relatively generous sail plan to keep the boat moving in the lee of the city buildings with the requirement for a user-friendly and safe boat to sail in relatively confined waters.

The confines of the river mean short legs and lots of manoeuvres, so the hull is rockered to enable quick tacks; there is no spinnaker. The design is also intended for safety in less sheltered waters like the lower Shannon estuary. The relatively high freeboard and built in buoyancy should make it safe under reasonable conditions on any stretch of water from sea to lake to river.

More on this from the AK. Ilen Company here: www.ilen.ie

Published in Irish Sailing Classes

#flycasting – The story of one a former World Champion from Limerick will be celebrated in a new festival In Castleconnell, details of which were announced today.

The John Enright Castleconnell Flycasting Festival will attract dozens of competitors from all over the world to the banks of the River Shannon in Castleconnell from Friday 11th to Sunday 13th October, 2013.

The inaugural event, which culminates in the Spey O Mega International Flycasting Championship, forms part of the Gathering Ireland 2013 project.

In 1896, local man John Enright became the Fly-Casting Champion of the World at Wimbledon Park Lake in England for Distance Casting Competition. He also won First Prize in all five events on that famous day. From 1890 to 1905 his success rate at Fly Casting on the International Circuit was phenomenal. The three-time World Champion, his World Record distance of 186 feet with a 20 foot Castleconnell Rod at Central Park in New York also stands today.

According to festival organiser, John Mac Namara: "John Enright's international exploits brought fame and glory to his native village of Castleconnell. Castleconnell Fishery became an International Fishing Centre and home of the famous Castleconnell Rod, while Castleconnell village was referred to as 'Little Paris'. This event is our way of celebrating this local figure and his contribution to putting Castleconnell on the international map."

Mr. Mac Namara added: "The event will feature fly-fishing instruction for all the family; an exhibition of fly-casting by 2010 World Flycasting Champion Ruairi Costello from Scarriff, an exhibition of John Enright memorabilia, riverboat trips; guided walks; street-based and evening entertainment; and a display of fly-fishing and casting by amateur and professional fishermen, culminating in the Spey O Mega International Casting Championship, which will attract expert competitors from around the world."

The John Enright Castleconnell Flycasting Festival is one of 161 Gathering Limerick festivals and events taking place during 2013. The Programme of events is being coordinated by the Limerick Gathering Team at City Hall. Other events scheduled to take place during the coming weeks include the Legends International Tag Rugby Festival (25-26 Oct), Limerick International Fashion Design Week 2013 (29 Oct-1 Nov), and Richard Harris International Film Festival (6-8 Dec).

For more see visit www.johnenrightfestival.com

Published in Angling
Tagged under

#watersafety – Limerick City Council is urging members of the public to report damaged, stolen, missing or retrieved ringbuoys after a lifebuoy box and pole were vandalised at Athlunkard Bridge.

A member of a local boat club last night reported the missing lifebuoy to the Council's Water Safety Development Officer who on inspection determined that the lifesaving device was either stolen or thrown into the River Shannon. The lifebuoy, which is due to be replaced in the coming days, is one of 16 lifebuoys to have been replaced around Limerick City since the beginning the year.

According to Valerie Stundon: "Lifebuoys are crucial to preventing drownings in Limerick's waterways. The damaging or removal of such vitally important equipment endangers lives which is why I urge members of the public to report such incidences directly to Limerick City Council or via www.ringbuoys.ie ."

Commenting on last night's incident at Athlunkard Bridge, the Council's Water Safety Development Officer said: "The lifebuoy box and pole were ripped from the ground and more than likely thrown into the river. A report was received from a member of Athlunkard Boat Club who reported that some people who have been jumping into the river have taken the buoy, got rid of the ring and have used the rope to make a swing by tying it on to a tree. I have now requested the Council's Roads Department to have a new pole, lifebuoy box and buoy erected during the coming days."

Ms. Stundon confirmed that a lifebuoy box and pole at Corbally Baths have recently suffered a similar fate as the Athlunkard Box and Pole.

She continued: "Keeping in mind that a stolen ringbuoy means a stolen life, it is regrettable that a very small minority of people continue to engage in stealing or vandalising ringbuoys, and fail to appreciate the potentially very serious consequences of their actions. The WSDO would ask members of the public to refrain from interfering with any lifebuoy around the City and only use them in the event of someone entering the river and requiring assistance. Lifebuoys are not a toy."

Limerick City Council has 53 lifebuoys located around the City. 45 replacements were made in total in 2012 with a recurrence for replacements of 3-4 times at some locations. 16 have replaced to date in 2013.

Members of the public are requested to report damaged, stolen, missing or retrieved ringbuoys via www.ringbuoys.ie , or by emailing [email protected] or calling 061-407100.

Published in Rescue

#Angling - Two men have been prosecuted in Co Tipperary for illegal fishing of spawning salmon.

Michael Harding of Bansha and Neill Collins of Cullen were prosecuted by Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) following investigations on the River Aherlow at Angelsboro, Co Limerick on 2 January this year.

IFI fishery officer Noel Power told Judge William Early at a sitting of Fermoy District Court on 3 May that both men has been observed fishing by night with a lamp and a spear.

Having heard the evidence, Judge Early convicted both men and levied fines on each: €350 for Collins and €300 for Harding, who informed the court he was unemployed. Both men were also ordered to pay costs amounting to €418.90.

"Wild Atlantic Salmon are part of our heritage," said Minister Fergus O’Dowd following the prosecution, "and the killing of spawning fish is an environmental outrage.

"I once again commend the work of IFI staff, working in remote areas, in the worst of weather, late at night protecting our wild salmon."

IFI reminds all anglers that interference with fish over their spawning beds is a serious offence, and that its staff are involved trying to stamp out this activity.

Much illegal fishing takes place at night, and IFI staff patrol the rivers during winter nights to ensure the protection of fish stocks.

"This illegal fishing is both barbaric and a threat to spawning salmon," says the fisheries agency. "Spears and modified forks are sometimes used in tandem with lights in the illegal killing of spawning salmon."

Published in Angling

# ROWING: Gusting winds and the damage caused by a launch to one of the lines marking the lanes resulted in Limerick Regatta being suspended. Quite a few of the finals had already been completed. Sinead Jennings won the women’s senior single sculls and Colm Dowling the men’s.

Limerick Regatta, O’Brien’s Bridge, Saturday (rowing suspended due to winds):

Men, Eight – Intermediate: 1 St Michael’s, 2 Trinity. Junior 16: 1 Colaiste Iognaid, 2 Presentation College, 3 St Joseph’s A. Masters: 1 Shannon/Clonmel, 2 Waterford, 3 Shannon.

Four – Senior: 1 St Michael’s A, 2 St Michael’s B. Novice, coxed: 1 NUIG B, 2 Trinity, 3 NUIG.

Pair – Senior: 1 St Michael’s, 2 St Michael’s B, 3 Clonmel.

Sculling, Quadruple – Senior: 1 Clonmel/Castleconnell, 2 Garda, 3 University of Limerick. Novice, coxed: 1 Commercial, 2 Galway, 3 St Michael’s.

Double – Junior 18A: 1 Commercial A, 2 Athlone A, 3 St Michael’s A.

Single – Senior: 1 Commercial (C Dowling), 2 Clonmel (Prendergast), 3 Castleconnell (Quinlan). Intermediate: 1 Clonmel (Prendergast), 2 Garda (Kelly), 3 Trinity (McElroy). Junior 18A: 1 Shannon (Carmody), 2 St Michael’s (O’Malley), 3 Athlone (Egan). Junior 16: 1 Castleconnell (Whittle), 2 Cork (O’Connell), 3 Waterford (Goff).

Women

Eight – Junior 18: 1 Galway, 2 Shannon.

Four – Novice, coxed: 1 Commercial, 2 Galway, 3 NUIG A.

Pair – Senior: 1 Muckross, 2 Commercial, 3 NUIG.

Sculling, Quadruple – Novice, coxed: 1 Cork, 2 Athlunkard. Junior 18A: 1 St Michael’s, 2 Galway A, 3 Castleconnell. Junior 16, coxed: 1 Carlow, 2 Neptune, 3 St Michael’s B.

Single – Senior: St Michael’s (S Jennings). Intermediate: 1 St Michael’s (O’Keeffe), 2 Commercial (Hogan), 3 Lee Valley (Corcoran).

Published in Rowing

#Shannon - The Shannon Foynes Port Company has launched its master plan for the development of port infrastructure and services along the Shannon Estuary.

RTÉ News reports on the 30-year plan, titled Vision 2041, which will involve the construction of a new deepwater birth at Foynes, the development of warehousing and facilities across 300 acres of additional land - and the potential reopening of the Foynes-Limerick railway line, which has lain dormant since 2001.

As one of the deepest waterways in Europe, the estuary is also in prime position to take advantage of the new 'post-panamax' supertanker shipping era, and talks on securing future foreign direct investment as a priority.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, submissions for the accompanying strategic plan for the development and management of marine-related industry and tourism in the Shannon Estuary region closed last week.

The Draft Strategic Integrated Framework Plan (SIFP) for the Shannon Estuary, the first of its type to be developed in Ireland, identifies a number of strategic sites along the estuary for future possible development in the areas of industry, tourism, energy, fishing and aquaculture and marine-related industry.

Published in Shannon Estuary

#InlandWaterways - Waterways Ireland wishes to advise masters and owners of vessels and boats on the Shannon Navigation that Sarsfield’s Lock in Limerick will be operated on restricted service from Thursday 28 February to Saturday 9 March 2013.

During this time the lock will only operate from 10am to 12.30pm daily.

Masters and owners are requested to ring the lockkeeper at 087 797 2998 one day prior to making their passage.

Published in Inland Waterways

#Shannon - MulkearLIFE and Inland Fisheries Ireland have announced details of a series of free illustrated talks taking place in Limerick throughout February on the extraordinarily rich natural heritage of Ireland, and in particular the Lower Shannon.

The talks form part of MulkearLIFE’s Environmental Education Programme, an outreach programme in local schools and the local community in the Mulkear catchment. The series will be hosted over four Tuesday evenings and will include leading experts sharing their knowledge on farming and conservation and biodiversity management.

Among the talks will be the fascinating story of Atlantic salmon in the River Shannon, presented by Dr Phil McGinnity on 12 February. Dr McGinnity is Beaufort Principal Investigator with UCC’s Aquaculture & Fisheries Development Centre, with more than 23 ears of experience in fisheries science and management, and his talk will outline new and extremely exciting research on the genetic make-up of various salmon types found in the Shannon. He will also examine the history of salmon fisheries on the Shannon. His talk should be of particular interest to anglers far and wide and anyone with a general interest in Irish biodiversity.

On 19 February, Colette O’Flynn will relate the scary story of what is emerging in terms invasive non-native animals and plants arriving into Ireland's coastal and inland waterways. O’Flynn is a research officer with the National Biodiversity Data Centre in Waterford. She manages the National Invasive Species Database for Ireland, which tracks non-native invasive animals and plants in Ireland. She is involved with many European and international invasive species information networks and has been involved with invasive species policy development for the European Commission. She previously worked in various areas in biodiversity education and awareness. Her talk should be of interest to a wide variety of people, especially anglers and those with an interest in Irish wildlife and general biodiversity.

The series of illustrated talks will conclude on 26 February with a talk by Eamon Cusack on building partnerships for sustainable fisheries on the Lower Shannon. Cusack is extremely well known in the fisheries world with over 35 years experience in inland fisheries management. As the former CEO of the Shannon Regional Fisheries Board, he encountered many of the challenges facing fisheries management, and has hands-on experience of policy development, strategic management, change management, enforcement, development and rehabilitation. This talk will focus on his recent work to bring together anglers and the ESB to provide to build effective and durable partnerships for sustainable fisheries. His talk should be of particular interest to local anglers and anyone with a general interest in conservation management and planning.

But the series begins on 5 February with a talk presented by Ruairí Ó Conchúir on conservation farming and biodiversity in the Upper Mulkear Catchment. Ó Conchúir is the manager of MulkearLIFE and has worked in land care management, rural development, farming for conservation and fisheries restoration work for over 20 years, including 10 years in Southern Africa. His talk will focus on the work of MulkearLIFE with farmers over the past three years, with a particular emphasis on partnership work with farmers to improve local habitats. The talk will also attempt to map out where upland farming in Ireland is heading and review work in other uplands parts of Ireland, and outline the likely implications are for upland communities, related farming and habitats post 2014. His talk should be of particular interest to anyone with a general interest in farming, the Irish uplands and the future of EU agri-environmental supports post 2014.

The venue for all talks is the Inland Fisheries Ireland office at Ashbourne Business Park, Dock Road, Limerick. There is plenty of free parking at the front of the building at night. Talks will commence at 8pm sharp and there is free admission to all talks. Further information regarding any of the talks may be obtained from the project [email protected] or from MulkearLIFE, Inland Fisheries Ireland (Limerick) at 061 300 238 or 087 062 5582.

Published in Shannon Estuary

#Angling - Anglers on the River Feale in Kerry and Limerick have been assured by Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) that it supports their concerns over the proposed deep-sea fish farm in Galway Bay, as the Limerick Leader reports.

Local anglers are among those throughout the region who have rallied in opposition to plans for the Aran Islands fish farm project, over fears that it would lead to “an explosion” in parasitic sea lice which would prey on wild inland salmon from Irish rivers feeding in the North Atlantic.

IFI reiterated its statement issued last month in which its board said it does not believe "that the corpus of peer reviewed international scientific literature which recognises the negative impacts of sea lice on salmonids have been adequately dealt with" in the Environmental Impact Statement prepared by Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) as part of the public consultation process.

A spokesperson for IFI told the Limerick Leader that the authority has "major concerns about the location and scale [of the farm], as well as its potential impact on sea life. [IFI] is not supporting it in its current form.”

Earlier this month the National Inland Fisheries Forum also criticised as "flawed" the consent process regarding the 15,000-tonne organic salmon farm planned off Inis Oirr, which would be the largest of its kind in Europe.

If approved, the operation could more than double Ireland's current production rate of farmed salmon.

The Limerick Leader has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling

# ROWING: St Joseph’s of Galway had a good day at the Castleconnell/Bulls and Bears head of the river on the Shannon on Saturday. The Junior 18A eight from the school was the fastest crew and the Junior 18A quadruple also won.

Castleconnell Bulls and Bears Head of the River, Saturday (Selected Results)

Men

Eight – Junior 18A: 1 St Joseph’s 10:06, 2 St Joseph’s B 10:14, 3 Col Iognaid 10:45. Junior 16: 1 St Joseph’s 10:56, 2 St Joseph’s B 11:06, 3 Col Iognaid 11:13. Masters: Shannon C 11:42.

Four – Intermediate One, Coxed: 1 Col Iognaid 11:29, 2 Fossa 11:34, 3 St Michael’s 11:52.

Pair – Senior: 1 St Michael’s G 11:15, 2 St Michael’s E 11:19, 3 Castleconnell/Clonmel 11:36. Junior 18A: 1 Clonmel 11:59, 2 Presentation Col 12:45, 3 Commercial 12:54.

Sculling, Quadruple, coxed – Junior 18A: 1 St Joseph’s 10:14, 2 Athlone 10:48, 3 Presentation Col 10:58. Junior 16: 1 Commercial 11:24, 2 Clonmel 11:27, 3 Presentation Col 11:39.

Double – Intermediate: 1 St Michael’s 11:13, 2 Garda 11:28, 3 St Michael’s B 11:40. Junior 18A: 1 Commercial B 12:13, 2 Commercial A 12:18, 3 Presentation Col B 12:28. Junior 16: 1 Castleconnell 11:57, 2 Clonmel 12:05, Athlone 12:05.

Single – Senior: 1 Commercial (D’Estelle Roe) 12:12, 2 Commercial (Gleeson) 12:32, 3 Offaly (O’Donoghue) 13:15. Intermediate One: 1 St Michael’s (Lazda) 12:29, 2 Commercial (Yeomans) 12:30, 3 University of Limerick (Haugh) 12:34. Novice: 1 Clonmel (Murphy) 12:44, 2 Clonmel (Chadfield) 12:57, 3 Offaly (Gannon) 13:52. Junior 18A: 1 Athlone (Molloy) 12:16, 2 Commercial (Yeomans) 12:31, 3 Commercial (Yeomans) 12:37, 4 St Michael’s (Despard) 12:37. Masters: Offaly (Hussey) 13:17. Junior 16: 1 St Michael’s (O’Malley) 12:05, 2 Neptune (Flynn) 12:45, 3 St Michael’s (O’Connor) 12:49.

Women

Eight – Novice: 1 Commercial 13:29, 2 Univ of Limerick B 14:43. Junior 18A: 1 Shannon 11:36, 2 Commercial 13:11, 3 Castleconnell 13:29. Junior 16: 1 Shannon 12:40, 2 Shannon B 12:51, 3 Commercial 15:39.

Four – Novice, coxed: 1 Commercial 12:52, 2 Athlone 13:32, 3 Commercial B 16:20.

Pair – Junior: Commercial 14:45.

Sculling

Junior 16, coxed: 1 St Michael’s B 12:58, 2 Col Iognaid 13:18, 3 St Michael’s F 13:19.

Double – Junior 18A: 1 St Michael’s E 13:07, 2 Commercial 13:16, 3 Clonmel 13:43. Junior 16: 1 Col Iognaid 13:37, 2 Tralee B 13:57, 3 Offaly 14:34.

Single – Intermediate: 1 Commercial (Foley) 13:39, 2 St Michael’s (McEvoy) 13:48, 3 Garda (Holden) 14:38. Novice: 1 Commercial (Foley) 13:58, 2 Shannon (Ryan) 14:27, 3 Univ of Limerick (O’Sullivan) 14:56. Junior 18A: 1 Commercial (Rodger) 14:14, 2 St Michael’s B (Sheehan) 14:36, 3 Castleconnell (Donegan) 14:42. Junior 16: 1 Commercial (Lambe) 14:00, 2 St Michael’s (Murphy) 14:05, 3 Castleconnell (Griffin) 14:31.

Published in Rowing
Page 4 of 6

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