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Displaying items by tag: Lough foyle

Suspension of the native oyster fishery in the Foyle area will continue for another month, with the closure extended until 6pm on Sunday 31 March.

The Loughs Agency says it made the decision following an analysis of the latest stock assessment data, which it says highlights the need to prioritise conservation.

“It is not a decision we have taken lightly,” Loughs Agency chief executive Sharon McMahon said. “We are fully aware of the impact that this will have on our native oyster fishery stakeholders in relation to the fishing of oysters in Lough Foyle.

“However, it is imperative that we take decisions in a science-led approach with the future sustainability of the fishery and the viability of the oyster population in mind.”

McMahon said Lough Agency marine scientists “made clear that removal of 100% of the stock above the minimum landing size is not sustainable, and removing a large proportion of stock over 80mm this season could have a detrimental impact on future recruitment to the population.

“Our remit as a regulatory body allows us to make informed management decisions such as this in real-time, which will help maintain a sustainable fishery for the future.”

Scientific data from the latest stock assessment can be found below:

Biomass summary

Population summary

Flatground summary

Great Bank summary

Perch summary

Quigleys Point summary

Southside North summary

Southside South summary

Published in Marine Science

Loughs Agency, the regulatory body for fisheries in Northern Ireland, has announced the suspension of the Native Oyster Fishery in the Foyle area starting from 6 am on October 24th, 2023, until 6 pm on February 29th, 2024.

The decision was reached after analyzing the latest stock assessment data, direct feedback from license holders, and sampling of the catch by Loughs Agency fishery officers.

The decision to close the fishery was made to prioritise conservation as the evidence available suggests the need to ensure the continued sustainability of the oyster population. Sharon McMahon, Loughs Agency CEO, stated that the decision was not taken lightly but is essential to maintain the biomass of spawning stock and the viability of the oyster population.

The decision will have a significant impact on the native oyster fishery stakeholders who will be unable to fish oysters in Lough Foyle during the closure period. However, the regulatory body is committed to taking decisions in a science-led approach to ensure the future sustainability of the fishery.

The marine scientists at Loughs Agency have provided evidence supporting the decision to ensure an acceptable biomass of spawning stock remains in the population for next season. They have also highlighted that removing 100% of the stock above the minimum landing size is not sustainable and removing a large proportion of stock over 80mm this season could have a detrimental impact on future recruitment to the population.

Loughs Agency's remit as a regulatory body allows them to make informed management decisions in real-time, helping maintain a sustainable fishery for the future.

Published in Marine Wildlife
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A sea trout tagged as part of a collaborative project led by the Loughs Agency and the River Faughan Anglers has provided remarkable insights into the growth and behaviour of these elusive fish within the Lough Foyle system.

The ‘Casting for Knowledge’ initiative highlights the value of combining the expertise of local anglers and scientific researchers to unravel the mysteries of sea trout ecology.

The sea trout in question, which bore the tag number 7841, was implanted on 12 May 2022 in the Faughan River thanks to the generous support of the River Faughan Anglers, who purchased the tag. The fish was then caught by a member of the club in the lower reaches of the river on 3 July this year.

This sea trout exhibited a unique pattern of behaviour by never venturing out to sea, and instead remaining exclusively within the Lough Foyle system.

In addition, the tagged sea trout demonstrated an impressive growth rate during this period, gaining 620 grams over the course of 14 months.

The Loughs Agency has championed the discovery as “a testament to the successful collaborative working between scientific researchers and angling clubs of the Faughan, Roe and Carrickmore rivers”.

Dr Diego del Villar, senior scientific officer at the Loughs Agency and lead scientist on the Casting for Knowledge project, expressed excitement about these significant findings.

“The journey of this sea trout showcases the immense potential of collaboration between anglers and scientists,” he said. “By harnessing the knowledge and expertise of local angling clubs, we can unlock crucial insights that have far-reaching implications for the management and conservation of these remarkable fish.”

Gerry Quinn, secretary at River Faughan Anglers added: “Having sponsored several tags, we were really interested to learn that a sea trout which was tagged on 12 May last year had successfully negotiated the various perils of the Faughan’s tidal stretch and Lough Foyle, and returned to the river just short of 14 months later. Indeed, the fact it was caught a few hundred yards from where it was tagged was quite the surprise.

“As fishers of the Faughan’s sea-going trout and custodians of the river, we welcome the opportunity to participate in and sponsor programmes which help to inform us about the lives of these elusive children of the tides.”

Published in Angling

The Loughs Agency has welcomed the cessation of two recent High Court cases in Dublin that it says sought to prevent the agency from effectively regulating the Lough Foyle oyster fishery.

This follows a decision by the plaintiffs to withdraw their various claims, which led to the cases being struck out.

The Loughs Agency is the statutory authority dedicated to sustainably managing, promoting and developing the fisheries and resources of the Foyle and Carlingford areas.

Loughs Agency chief executive Sharon McMahon said: “Throughout the legal proceedings, our commitment to upholding the principles of good governance and fulfilling our statutory obligations has remained unwavering. We have diligently cooperated with the legal process, providing transparency and demonstrating the strength of our position.

“This favourable outcome not only showcases the robustness of our operations but also reaffirms the legal position of our statutory responsibilities. As a trusted North South Implementation Body, we consistently strive to fulfil our responsibilities and act in the best interests of the communities we serve.”

The Loughs Agency has responsibility for 4,070 sq km of catchment in the Foyle area and 480 sq km in Carlingford, with responsibility for the two sea loughs and an area extending 12 miles out to sea from Lough Foyle, which stretches to Downhill in Northern Ireland and Malin Head in Donegal.

Its board reports to the North South Ministerial Council (NSMC) and government sponsor departments: the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) in Northern Ireland and the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC) in Ireland.

Published in Fishing

The Department of Transport has been advised by Donegal County Council that works will begin on the construction of a breakwater outside the entrance of Greencastle Harbour on Lough Foyle in Co Donegal.

These works will begin on Monday 12 June and are anticipated to continue until December 2023, subject to weather and operational constraints.

The works include, but are not limited to, the following main construction elements:

  • Construction of a 150m extension to the existing breakwater
  • Construction of temporary works to include access roads, storage, temporary quay and weigh bridge at Queensport in Greencastle
  • Removal of existing Aids to Navigation (AtoN) and installation of new temporary AtoN’s
  • Importation of circa 350,000 tonnes of rock core and rock armour by land and also by sea from Foyle Port
  • Placement of circa 350,000 tonnes of rock core and rock armour using split hopper barges, jack-up barge platform and tugs

The works are being carried out by marine civil engineering contractors working from a temporary quay at the Queensport in Greencastle and the Greencastle pontoon using work vessels, jack up barges, heavy civil engineering plant and equipment. Divers may also be employed from time to time on site.

For safety reasons, mariners are advised to proceed slowly and with caution within the area south-west of the entrance to Greencastle Harbour and to give the works area a wide berth. Wave wash from vessels should be avoided.

A map and plan of the planned works as well as contact details can be found in Marine Notice No 38 of 2023, attached below.

Published in Irish Harbours
Tagged under

Several marine and river rescues merited national bravery awards presented at Farmleigh House in Dublin on Friday.

Greencastle Coast Guard unit member Kevin Barr was presented with a gold medal for rescuing Geraldine Mullan from Lough Foyle, Co Donegal, on August 20th, 2020 after the car in which she and her husband and two children were travelling skidded off the road into the water at Quigley’s Point.

Barr lived locally and was on the scene very quickly, observing Mullan at the bottom of the car, which had turned over and landed on its roof.

The citation says that “without any hesitation, Mr Barr made his way with the assistance of the fire service down to the vehicle and held onto her until the other emergency services arrived and helped get her to safety”.

“Tragically, her husband and two children had also been in the car and their bodies were later recovered. The lady who survived later thanked all those who had assisted on the night but paid particular tribute to Kevin Barr for his intervention,” the citation says.

Michael Downes was awarded a silver medal for rescuing a boy who fell out of his canoe near Oldhead beach, close to Louisburgh. The citation says the incident occurred in July 1974, when the boy had lost his paddle and was grabbing on to the side of the canoe.

“Michael Downes ran over to the pier and assessed the situation. Noticing that the tide was on the turn and without a moment’s thought for his own safety Michael dived off the pier and into the water. He swam out to where the panicking boy was (approximately 120 yards) and attempted to calm him down,”the citation says.

Michael Downes with from left his son Patrick, wife Maureen and Karen Downes who received a silver medal at the Oireachtas National Bravery awards for the rescue of a boy from the sea in Old Head, Louisburgh, Co. Mayo in July 1974Michael Downes with from left his son Patrick, wife Maureen and Karen Downes who received a silver medal at the Oireachtas National Bravery awards for the rescue of a boy from the sea in Old Head, Louisburgh, Co. Mayo in July 1974 Photo: Maxwells

“The tide was now rapidly turning and the boy at this point had become exhausted. Michael, knowing how tired the boy was, secured him over the bow of the canoe and attempted to swim back to the pier, pulling the canoe,”it says.

“ As the tide was going out, he had to navigate across a rocky patch where he received significant cuts resulting in loss of blood and hypothermia. Despite the rocks cutting him he managed to get the boy back to the safety of the pier where they were received and looked after, although Michael still carries the scars to this day,”the citation says.

Two gardai, James Keegan and Colin Kyne-Delaney and Lee Conlon were awarded a bronze medal for saving a man from the river Liffey on March 14th, 2020.

Mr Lee Conlon (left) and Garda Colin Kyne-Delaney and who all received bronze medals at the Oireachtas National Bravery awards for the rescue of a man from the River Liffey at Eden Quay in March 2020 Photo: MaxwellsMr Lee Conlon (left) and Garda Colin Kyne-Delaney and who all received bronze medals at the Oireachtas National Bravery awards for the rescue of a man from the River Liffey at Eden Quay in March 2020 Photo: Maxwells

“As well as the obvious risk to their lives, including the risk of struggling in cold water and possible drowning, there was also the risk of disease such as Weil’s disease which highlights the great risk that these gardai and Mr Conlon took in order to conduct this rescue,”the citation says.

The annual honours are awarded by Comhairle na Míre Gaile – the Deeds of Bravery Council – which was founded in 1947 to enable State recognition of exceptional acts of bravery.

The council is chaired by the Ceann Comhairle and includes the Cathaoirleach of Seanad Éireann, the Lord Mayors of Dublin and Cork, the Garda Commissioner, the President of the Association of City and County Councils, and the chairman of the Irish Red Cross.

The Ceann Comhairle said that “on behalf of the people of Ireland, let me thank the brave recipients for their actions, for their selflessness, for their courage and for showing us that we can all make a difference on this island we share and in this world we walk together.”

Full list of citations:

Citation No 1 - Mr John Colfer

Intervening in an assault on a Garda

On the evening of 24 September 2018, John Colfer was cycling home from work and encountered a gang of youths attacking a member of An Garda Síochána. The Garda had been hit in the face, his nose was broken and he had been knocked to the ground. John Colfer intervened and placed himself between the assailants and the injured Garda. Despite ongoing threats and being outnumbered by 5 to 1, John stood his ground and protected the Garda from further attack. John stayed at the scene until more Gardaí arrived on the scene to deal with the gang.

For his efforts, John Colfer is awarded a bronze medal.

Citation No 2 – Garda Kieran Donovan

Saving a man from a motorway bridge

On the morning of 16 July 2018, Gardaí responded to a report of a man, who appeared to be extremely distressed and emotional, standing on the outer rail of a motorway flyover bridge. It was an approx. 20-25metre drop to the motorway below. Garda Donovan climbed out onto the side of the bridge rail to talk to the man and to help get him to return in off the ledge. The man eventually agreed to walk off the ledge with Garda Donovan and received medical attention and aid immediately.

For his efforts Garda Kieran Donovan is awarded a bronze medal.

Citation No 3 - Garda James Keegan, Garda Colin Kyne-Delaney and Mr Lee Conlon

Rescue of a man from the River Liffey at Eden Quay

On the afternoon of Saturday, 14 March 2020, a man was seen entering the River Liffey. Garda James Keegan, Garda Colin Kyne-Delaney and Mr. Lee Conlon swiftly entered the river to try to save the man. An ambulance was waiting when they brought him to street level and resuscitation efforts began. As well as the obvious risk to their lives, including the risk of struggling in cold water and possible drowning, there was also the risk of disease such as Weil’s disease which highlights the great risk that these Gardai and Mr Conlon took in order to conduct this rescue.

For their efforts Garda James Keegan, Garda Colin Kyne-Delaney and Mr Lee Conlon are each awarded a bronze medal.

Citation No 4 – Michael Nallon

Rescue of a man from an overturned digger

On Friday 7 August 2020, Michael Nallon was working with a colleague in the townland of Ballinafad, Belcarra, Co. Mayo. His colleague, who was driving an excavator, became medically unwell and slumped over the controls of the machine. The machine spun around a couple of times and then entered the river. According to Gardaí, the river was high and fast flowing as a result of heavy rain over the previous days. Mr. Nallon entered the water and climbed into the cab to rescue his colleague. He remained on the machine for almost an hour, holding his colleague’s head above water until help from the emergency services arrived. His colleague was then safely taken from the machine, placed on a stretcher and stabilised. A helicopter was required to remove him from the site due to the remote location and bring him to hospital.

For his efforts Michael Nallon is awarded a Bronze Medal

Citation 5 - Micheál Bourke and Katie Butler Haughney

Rescue of a boy from a waterhole

On 11 February, 2020, Daniel Bourke, who was just 2 at the time went missing and was later discovered, by his brother, head first in a hole which was approximately 4 foot deep and full of muddy water. There had been heavy snow in the area and the extent of the hole had been hidden. His brother Micheál, who was 9 years old at the time attempted to pull him out of the water but due to the weight of Daniel’s saturated clothes he was unable to. His sister, Katie Butler Haughney, who was 14 at the time succeeded in pulling him out. The toddler was blue and lifeless and was carried into the house where his mother started doing compressions.

After 20 minutes of CPR, he started to breathe again and colour began to return to his face. The little boy was taken to an ambulance and from there, lifted by helicopter to Limerick Regional Hospital, where he eventually made a full recovery.

For their efforts Micheál Bourke and Katie Butler Haughney are each awarded a Bronze Medal.

Citation No 6 - Garda Brendan Crawford and Garda Ciaran Murray

Rescue of a woman from the River Camac

On the morning of 17 June 2020 a woman was walking her dog on a harness lead near the Camac river. The dog fell into the water near a culvert running under the M50 motorway and pulled its owner in too. There had been very heavy rain in the previous days and the water level was high. The current was so strong that the lady and her dog were swept into the tunnel. When Gardaí arrived the woman was too far down the tunnel to be seen but could be heard crying for help. The Gardaí took ropes from their car and entered the water. The woman was located about 50 feet into the tunnel which was too far for their rope. Gardaí Murray and Crawford continued through the water and managed to get to the woman who had held onto her dog which was struggling causing her to sink under the water. Garda Crawford took hold of the dog and both he and Garda Murray assisted the lady out of the tunnel and eventually brought her back through the waters. Despite being barely able to speak from cold and shock, the lady made a full recovery.

For their efforts Garda Brendan Crawford and Garda Ciaran Murray are each awarded a Bronze Medal.

Citation No 7 – Michael Downes

Rescue of a boy from the sea in Old Head, Louisburgh, Co. Mayo

In July 1974 a boy fell out of his canoe in the sea near Oldhead beach. The boy had lost his paddle and was grabbing on to the side of the canoe panicking and shouting for help. Michael Downes ran over to the pier and assessed the situation. Noticing that the tide was on the turn and without a moment’s thought for his own safety Michael dived off the pier and into the water. He swam out to where the panicking boy was (approximately 120 yards) and attempted to calm him down. The tide was now rapidly turning and the boy at this point had become exhausted. Michael , knowing how tired the boy was, secured him over the bow of the canoe and attempted to swim back to the pier pulling the canoe. As the tide was going out, he had to navigate across a rocky patch where he received significant cuts resulting in loss of blood and hypothermia. Despite the rocks cutting him he managed to get the boy back to the safety of the pier where they were received and looked after, although Michael still carries the scars to this day.

For his efforts Michael Downes is awarded a Silver Medal

Citation No 8 – Liam Halpin

Rescue of a woman from the sea in Co. Clare

On August the 3rd 2020 at approximately 4:30 pm, a twenty year old woman and her thirteen year old foster brother were on the beach at Doughmore Bay in Doonbeg. They were playing in the water and jumping the waves. Shortly afterwards the young boy ran up the beach screaming that the young lady had been suddenly swept out to sea due to the undercurrent and strong waves.

He pointed to where she was, but no one could see her as she was being swept out further and further to sea. Nobody could go in as no one had any kind of buoyancy aid. After about 15 minutes Liam Halpin jumped in with a small red body board, despite the pleadings of his family not to go in. He managed to get to the young woman just as she felt she could no longer fight on. Around 15 minutes later he had her back on shore. The Coastguard attended and she was then airlifted to Limerick University Hospital.

For his efforts Liam Halpin is awarded a Silver Medal.

Citation No 9 – Miley Doran

Rescue of a woman and her daughter from the River Barrow, Co. Carlow

On Sunday 30 May 2021, 17 year old Miley Doran saved a woman and her 13 year old daughter from drowning on the River Barrow. The girl went into the water with friends but got into difficulty and when her mother entered the river in an effort to save her, she too started struggling with the strength of the current in the water. Miley Doran, who was fishing nearby heard the screams calling for help and ran to their aid.

Miley dived into the water without hesitation and rescued the young girl first, pulling her to the bank, whereupon he turned back to rescue her mother. He then put his jumper back on, gathered his fishing gear and left without seeking praise or recognition.

The President of Ireland himself commented on Miley Doran’s actions saying he was enormously impressed by his courage and generous instinct.

For his efforts Miley Doran is awarded a Silver Medal.

Citation No 10 – Rosaleen Feeney

Rescue of a man from a burning house in Co. Mayo

At 6.20 am on the morning of 31 May 2021 a fire broke out at a house near Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo. On noticing the fire, the elderly occupant activated his emergency pendant and Rosaleen Feeney, who was his emergency contact, responded. On route to the house she could see flames and rang the Gardaí and fire service. On her arrival Rosaleen could see the fire closing in around the elderly man who was shouting at her through the window. He told her he could feel the heat of the fire. Rosaleen smashed the window and pulled him through it, burning her hand in the process. The man’s clothes had started to burn and he was treated by ambulance crew and then moved to Mayo University Hospital.

For her efforts Rosaleen Feeney is awarded a Silver Medal.

Citation No 11 – Stephen Ryan

Rescue of 3 women from the sea in Greystones, Co. Wicklow

On 23 April 2022, at the North Cove, Greystones, Co Wicklow, three females entered the sea at a point known locally as “The North Cove”, a sheltered area of the beach behind a line of rock armour. There was a strong easterly wind blowing ashore, causing heavy seas. A short time later a number of calls were made requesting emergency services.

Stephen Ryan, having already made it back to the beach, took his surf board and re-entered the water himself, swimming out to the females beyond the safety of the North Cove. He then held the three females on his surf board whilst attempting to provide CPR to one of them as best he could whilst in the water. The stiff easterly wind and rising tide made his task more difficult and the group spent approximately 40 minutes in the water, before being brought ashore. Sadly, despite Stephen’s best efforts one of the women brought ashore was pronounced dead. However local Gardaí noted that without his help there would have been more fatalities.

For his efforts Stephen Ryan is awarded a Silver Medal.

Citation No 12 – Kevin Barr

Rescue of a woman from Lough Foyle, Co. Donegal

On Thursday 20 August 2020 Storm Ellen brought very high winds and heavy rainfall across the country. At around 10.pm, a car skidded off the road and fell into the water at Quigley’s Point, Co. Donegal. A member of Greencastle Coast Guard Unit, Kevin Barr, lived locally and was quickly on the scene. A woman was observed on the bottom of the car as the car had turned over and landed on the roof. The waves were washing over her and she was in danger of being washed off the vehicle. Without any hesitation Mr Barr made his way with the assistance of the fire service down to the vehicle and held onto her until the other emergency services arrived and helped get her to safety. Tragically , her husband and two children had also been in the car and their bodies were later recovered. The lady who survived later thanked all those who had assisted on the night but paid particular tribute to Kevin Barr for his intervention.

For his efforts Kevin Barr is awarded a Gold Medal.

Published in Rescue

The crash site of a rare Royal Navy helicopter lost in 1958 has been discovered as part of a scientific survey of the Northern Ireland coastline.

Remnants of the aircraft were initially spotted in aerial photos of Lough Foyle as part of the Northern Ireland 3D Coastal Survey, commissioned by NI’s Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA).

But it was a further physical inspection of the site that revealed the wreck of the Dragonfly, an early example of a military helicopter, lying on its starboard side on the gravelly bank.

Though heavily corroded, the frame of the helicopter and its three rotor blades were mostly intact, with remnants of the ‘Royal Navy’ stencilling still discernible down the tail boom.

Further research involving officials from the National Museum of the Royal Navy in Plymouth, the Fleet Air Arm Museum in Yeovilton and the Ulster Aviation Society identified the aircraft as a 1955 Westland Dragonfly naval air-sea search and rescue helicopter, which was based at the Royal Naval Air Station Eglinton, now the City of Derry Airport. The helicopter had come down on 25 November 1958, during a recovery exercise.

The discovery of the Dragonfly was an unexpected find during the Topographic LiDAR & Orthophotography survey, which was completed in early 2022.

This survey has provided high-resolution aerial photographs, near-infrared imagery and 3D laser scans of the ground surface to provide detailed information on what the NI coastline looks like, as well as identify human-made structure and landscape features at risk from coastal erosion and rising sea levels.

Marine archaeologists are using this data to identify and assess archaeological and historical sites that lie around Northern Ireland’s coastline. These can include historic wrecks, medieval fish-traps, monastic settlements, castles and fortifications, quays, slipways, and Industrial-era seaweed cultivation sites.

While many of the sites examined are recorded on the Historic Environment Record of Northern Ireland (HERoNI), the research has so far identified over 150 new heritage sites, with 100 of these below the high-tide mark.

The exact position of the helicopter wreck is not being released as the crash site is located on dangerous soft sediment and a significant number of potentially live Second World War and post-war ordnance surround the site.

Further information on the find will be available on a new website, The Northern Ireland Coastal Observatory, which DAERA says will be launched in the near future.

Tagged under

Interested parties are now invited to apply for a licence to fish the 2022/2023 native oyster fishery on Lough Foyle.

Applicants will be required to submit a completed application via post, which must be received on or before Friday 29 July.

It is the responsibility of the applicant to provide proof of postage in the event of a late application delivery or a missing application.

At this stage the Loughs Agency asks that only completed application forms are sent. Please do not send additional documents or payment.

Loughs Agency offices are currently closed but application forms are available for download.

The licence fee is £150 or €166 and fees payable on receipt of licence.

No late applications will be accepted without proof of postage within the stated application timeframe.

Send applications to the following address:

Oyster Licence Applications
Loughs Agency
22 Victoria Road
Derry ~ Londonderry
BT47 2AB
Northern Ireland

Telephone opening hours 9am to 5pm Monday-Friday
Tel: +44 (0) 28 71 342100
Fax: +44 (0) 28 71 342720

Published in Fishing

A newly built 150m oil tanker which ran aground close to the mouth of Lough Foyle earlier this morning has been refloated.

As Afloat reported earlier, the 11,826 tonne Thun Liffey was leaving Lisahally terminal in Derry for Milford Haven when the incident occurred at about 9am. 

The ship grounded on the “Tuns” sandbank, running between the mouth of the Foyle and Magilligan Point. 

No pollution and no injuries have been reported. However, several tugs were dispatched to assist the vessel in refloating on the incoming tide.

The ship has returned to Derry, and it is expected it will be inspected for any damage before it is authorised to leave port again.

The Thun Liffey was built this year (2020) and is sailing under the Netherlands flag.

It had steamed frequently between Derry and Milford Haven this month, and had already discharged its cargo.

It was due to have berthed in Milford Haven at 10 am on Wednesday morning (Dec 30).

Published in Ports & Shipping
Tagged under

Focusing her attention to the transport heritage on “God’s Side of the peninsula”, Rosie Moulden, Manager of the Inishowen Maritime Museum in Greencastle, revealed the first recorded steamer trip on Lough Foyle took place in 1816.

Speaking to Derry Now, Rosie said: “On August 25, 1816, a Clyde based steamer took an excursion of 30 passengers from Derry to Greencastle. Unfortunately, there is no mention of her name, only that she had come from the Clyde earlier in the month.

“There are reports that a steamer was brought from Glasgow to Derry to provide towage services for barges between Derry and Strabane. She was also used to provide towage services on Lough Foyle and is mentioned as having towed McCorkell’s ship, ‘Marcus Hill’, down-river to Greencastle to catch a fair wind for her outward passage. The ‘Marcus Hill’ was operated by McCorkell’s between 1815 and 1827.

“There may have been two steamers offering towage on the Lough at that time. The ‘Britannia’ was a wooden-hulled paddle steamer, built in Port Glasgow, in 1815.

“In 1820, she made an excursion voyage from the Clyde to the Giant’s Causeway. In 1821, she made another four-day excursion voyage from the Clyde, calling at Derry, Culmore, Redcastle, Moville and Greencastle,” said Rosie Moulden.

The ‘Britannia’ was then bought by Alexander A Laird and Company for the Glasgow and Londonderry Steam Packet Company.

It began a regular Glasgow to Derry service in 1822, with additional calls at Culmore, Quigley's Point, Moville, Greencastle and Portrush.

For more on the Foyle's historic paddle steamer era and photos click here.

Published in Historic Boats
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