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Displaying items by tag: Galway Harbour

Paramedic Patrick Dunne is a keen kitesurfer, windsurfer, sailor, swimmer and general watersports enthusiast who has volunteered with the RNLI.

He has initiated a petition opposing Galway County Council’s new draft bye-laws which propose to ban watersports apart from swimming off 24 beaches in the county.

As initially reported by Afloat, the draft bye-laws state that “no person shall windsurf on sailboards or kite-surf on kiteboards or surf on a surfboard or use a canoe, kayak, dinghy, stand-up paddle board or water bike in close proximity to bathers” off any of the 24 named beaches.

The draft bye-laws also state that the council “ may at its discretion designate areas of any beach in and at which the use of surfboards and/or kiteboards and/or sailboards and/or canoes and kayaks and/or dinghies and/or stand-up paddle boards and/or water bikes is restricted or prohibited”.

However, watersports enthusiasts point out that consultation on zoning should have taken place before any draft legislation was published.

Blue Flag criteria also stipulate that beaches must be accessible to all and that there must be management and zoning for different users to prevent conflicts and accidents.

If Galway County Council’s bye-laws are passed without amendment, the council may be empowered to issue on-the-spot fines of €75 euro to anyone in breach of conditions and, if found guilty in court, a fine of up to €1,904.60.

The deadline for submissions on the proposals has been extended to 4 pm on November 25th.

Paramedic Patrick Dunne (right) is a keen kitesurfer, windsurfer, sailor, swimmer and general watersports enthusiastParamedic Patrick Dunne (right) is a keen kitesurfer, windsurfer, sailor, swimmer and general watersports enthusiast

Patrick Dunne spoke to Wavelengths about the petition he has initiated and why his own personal experience leads him to believe this type of legislation will create an unnecessary conflict between swimmers and all other watersports users.

Listen to Wavelengths below

Published in Wavelength Podcast
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The rich history of the river Corrib is explored in a new guide by Galway author and historian William Henry.

The Corrib is among Europe’s shortest rivers, at only six kilometres from the lake to the Atlantic, but has Ireland’s second largest flow rate after the Shannon.

The guide, divided into two sections, charts the river extending upstream from the estuary on the Claddagh towards Lough Corrib.

It documents locations and buildings along the riverbank extending from Wood Quay to Friar’s Cut - so named for giving members of the Franciscan order easier access to their friary in Claregalway.

William Henry, Galway historian and author of a new guide and history of the river CorribWilliam Henry, Galway historian and author of a new guide and history of the river Corrib

The history of Menlo castle, Terryland castle, the Dangan ring fort and the 19th century Martin “tea house folly” on the grounds of the University of Galway are explored by the author, and the book combines themes of prehistory and archaeology with a history of the various boating craft which plied the river.

National Geographic books author and editor Jack Kavanagh has paid tribute to the guide, stating that “William Henry’s River Corrib Guide takes readers on a geographic, historical, and cultural journey into the heart of the Galway region”.

“It is as entertaining as it is educational. Readers will warm to the stories in this book,” Kavanagh has said.

“ A seanchaí as well as an astute historian, you’ll find no better literary skipper to spirit you into Galway’s wonderful waterways,” Kavanagh has said of Henry.

River Corrib Guide by William Henry is available in a number of Galway bookshops, including Bell, Book and Candle, Charlie Byrne’s, Kenny’s Books and Dubray Books, or by emailing [email protected]

Published in Galway Harbour
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A collaboration between Galway Bay Boat Tours, Galway Hooker Sailing Club and Galway Bay Seafoods, this will celebrate Galway’s maritime culture on October 21/22/23, a 3-day event in Galway’s Docklands, the harbour, the commercial Docks, Claddagh and along the seashore.

The festival will highlight Galway’s seafood and introduce the public to the city’s iconic Galway Hooker sailing boats and its maritime history, according to the organisers; “Get to meet the boat builders, sample seafood, take a guided walk around the Docklands, go on board a boat for a spin through Claddagh. There will be supervised sessions on how to drive a motorboat. The festival will have something for everyone, sea-themed activities, art competitions, crafts and entertainment for all the family.”

Speakers will talk about Galway’s maritime heritage, with rigging demonstrations of the Galway Hookers and a Parade of Sail.

The festival will finish with an auction in Claddagh Hall on Sunday evening, October 23.

Funds raised will go to Galway RNLI and LAST - Lost at Sea Tragedies.

Published in Galway Harbour

Lines of light showing projected sea level rise in Galway city is part of a collaborative project involving scientists and artists which will extend across a number of Irish coastal areas this year.

Línte na Farraige aims to provoke a dialogue around rising sea levels and the need to adapt societal behaviour to tackle climate change.

The installations comprise illuminated horizontal lines, based on predictions of future sea level rise from international benchmarks that represent future sea level and storm surges.

Galway City Museum has created a pop up “climate change gallery”, which features the Línte na Farraige exhibition and provides a viewing point for “lines of light” showing how the Atlantic may rise in the Spanish Arch area on the banks of the river Corrib.

The set of visual light installations has been created by Finnish artists Timo Aho and Pekka Niittyvirta who worked on similar projects in their home country of Finland, in Florida, USA, and in Scotland.

The scenarios draw on research published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) AR6 report and Irish tide gauge data.

As the IPCC reports have pointed out, sea level rise is driven by global greenhouse gas emissions.

It is estimated that sea level may rise by between 0.37 metres in a low emissions scenario, and by 1.88 metres in a high emissions scenario, by the year 2150 .

Línte na Farraige involves scientists, based at Trinity College Dublin, Maynooth University and University College Cork, the Climate Action Regional Offices (CAROs) and local authorities.

The Native Events sustainable event management company is also involved to ensure the installations have minimal environmental impact, while partners Algorithm are developing an interactive website.

The LED light installations will be located at the Spanish Arch and Ard Bia in Galway for six months, and at the Claddagh Basin for four days.

The project has been funded by Creative Ireland.

Published in Galway Harbour
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The Marine Institute's newest research vessel the RV Tom Crean has completed its delivery voyage from a Spanish shipyard to Ireland, having arrived this morning to dock in the Port of Galway.

RV Tom Crean which cost €25m will remain in Galway before embarking on its first survey towards the end of July and then making its way to Dingle in advance of its official commissioning due to take place in Autumn 2022.

As Ireland's latest marine research vessel has been named the RV Tom Crean (as Afloat highlighted in early 2021), after the renowned seaman and explorer from Kerry who undertook three ground-breaking expeditions to the Antarctic in the early years of the 20th Century.

Ireland’s newest research vessel the RV Tom Crean has arrived in Irish waters and is currently docked in the Port of Galway before embarking on its first survey towards the end of July and then making its way to Dingle in advance of its official commissioning due to take place in Autumn 2022Ireland’s newest research vessel the RV Tom Crean has arrived in Irish waters and is currently docked in the Port of Galway before embarking on its first survey towards the end of July and then making its way to Dingle in advance of its official commissioning due to take place in Autumn 2022

The RV Tom Crean which will be based in Galway after its commissioning will enable the Marine Institute to continue to lead and support vital scientific surveys that contribute to Ireland's position as a leader in marine science. The research vessel will carry out a wide range of marine research activities including expanded fisheries surveys, seabed mapping and marine spatial planning, climate change related research, environmental monitoring, deep water surveys, and support increased research in the Atlantic Ocean.

The RV Tom Crean arrives in Galway docks amid great excitementAbove and below: The RV Tom Crean arrives in Galway docks amid great excitement

Above and below: The RV Tom Crean arrives in Galway docks amid great excitement

Paul Connolly, CEO of the Marine Institute speaking about the vessel's arrival into Irish Waters said: "This has been an extremely successful project with the vessel arriving on budget and on time into Irish Shores. We are delighted that Galway, is the vessel's first stop in Irish waters ahead of its official launch and commissioning due to take place in Dingle, Kerry in Autumn. The new vessel will be used by the Marine Institute, other state agencies and universities to undertake critical work to support fisheries assessment, offshore renewable energy, marine spatial planning, marine protected areas and addressing the challenges of climate change. After the official commissioning, the RV Tom Crean will be based in Galway, and it will greatly enhance our capacity to undertake collaborative research and acquire the data and knowledge essential to sustainably manage our ocean resources."

Ireland's latest marine research vessel has been named the RV Tom Crean, after the renowned seaman and explorer from Kerry who undertook three ground-breaking expeditions to the Antarctic in the early years of the 20th Century. Pictured were Isaac White age 10 and Seren Flavin age 9. Picture Jason ClarkeIreland's latest marine research vessel has been named the RV Tom Crean, after the renowned seaman and explorer from Kerry who undertook three ground-breaking expeditions to the Antarctic in the early years of the 20th Century. Pictured were Isaac White age 10 and Seren Flavin age 9. Picture Jason Clarke

The new research vessel is a silent vessel, capable of operating throughout the Irish Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and will replace the RV Celtic Voyager, which was Ireland's first purpose-built research vessel which arrived in 1997. The RV Tom Crean will be at sea for 300 operational days each year – heading to sea for at least 21 days at a time - and aims to accommodate up to 3000 scientist days annually and is designed to operate in harsh sea conditions.

The vessel design incorporates the latest proven technologies to ensure that it operates as efficiently as possible, with reduced fuel consumption and minimising the vessel's environmental impact and carbon footprint.

You can track the progress of the vessel in the lead up to its official commissioning in September on the Marine Institute website here.

Listen to Lorna Siggins' podcast with Aodhan Fitzgerald, the Marine Institute’s research vessel manager, and project manager for the new build here

Published in RV Tom Crean

A local Government TD says he’s “confident” that Galway will be chosen to host a new naval base for an expanded Irish Navy.

Speaking to Galway Talks yesterday, Defence Minister Simon Coveney confirmed a new base will be sited along the west coast as part of plans to radically increase spending.

He said while Galway is in the running, it could be located anywhere between Galway and Donegal.

But Fine Gael Deputy Ciaran Cannon believes Galway is the most logical choice.

Meanwhile, a Dun Laoghaire TD has repeated her call this week for the 'underutilised' Dun Laoghaire Harbour on Dublin Bay to be a base for the Navy in the capital's waters.

Published in Galway Harbour
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Andy Fennell's 39ft trimaran Morpheus, the leader at the 48-hour Galway stopover in the 2000-mile Round Britain & Ireland Race 2022 from Plymouth, is now well on her way to the next stop at Lerwick in the Shetlands. But the variations in the fleet size and speed are such that the reception team from Galway Bay SC and the Port of Galway find that their services will have been on call 24-hours for a full week by the time the smallest boat, the Italian-owned vintage Vertue 25 Mea, heads on for Lerwick this coming Tuesday evening.

The skipper of the next-smallest boat in the fleet, 19-year-old Lou Boorman, was taking her boat to sea yesterday (Sunday) evening to start the passage to Lerwick when the little Mea (Matteo Ricardi) finally hove into sight under power, heading for Galway Dock after finishng Stage 1 at the line in the open waters of the Bay.

Thus as Mea won't be allowed to resume racing until Tuesday evening, it will be a clear week since Morpheus swept into town, having come zooming up the coast at a crisp 17 knots past the Cliffe of Moher. But that famous Galway "hospitality gene" has been well up to the seven-day challenge - many of the visitors said they will come back and visit Galway again, and many friendships were struck up with the members of Galway Bay Sailing Club who have been on call for a week to look after the sailors.

The Vertue 25 Mea (Matteo Richardi) finally reaches GalwayThe Vertue 25 Mea (Matteo Richardi) finally reaches Galway

There were slower boats still arriving from Plymouth in Galway yesterday evening in the Round Britain and Ireland 2022 as the majority of the fleet threw themselves into party and feasting mode in the temporary but very effective dockside Genesys-sponsored Commander Bill King Club, with evidence that some crews hadn’t enjoyed a full meal since sailing away from Plymouth on Sunday.

It was time to relax among crews and hosts alike, with members and officers of Galway Bay SC and the Royal Western YC of E developing friendships which will doubtless lead on to cooperation in other events in the future. But in the meantime, the remorseless ticking of the clock means that on-water leader Morpheus, Andy Fennell’s 39ft Shuttleworth trimaran, will be shaping up at 1700hrs this evening (Thursday) to take her departure for the long leg to Lerwick in the Shetland Islands, as her crew’s entertaining 48-hour introduction to Galway hospitality is coming to it mandatory conclusion.

Ross Hobson’s leading mono-hull Pegasus berthed right at the front door of the Commander Bill King Club on Galway DocksRoss Hobson’s leading mono-hull Pegasus berthed right at the front door of the Commander Bill King Club on Galway Docks

Party time in the Bill King Club - it was clear that some crews hadn’t enjoyed a square meal since leaving PlymouthParty time in the Bill King Club - it was clear that some crews hadn’t enjoyed a square meal since leaving Plymouth

Morpheus came up Galway Bay so quickly on Tuesday that the next to leave, the DazCat 45 Hissy Fit, won’t be going until 23.30hrs tonight. So already not only are the two leaders starting to have their individual separate races, but they’re now in a different sailing universe from the world of the tail-enders – the Contessa 32 White Knight from Wales (Lou Boorman) and the Italian Vertue 35 Mea - which are still off Ireland’s southwestern seaboard after some slow progress across the Celtic Sea.

Stripped-out racing machine – race leader Morpheus (39ft) has an all-up weight of less than three tons.Stripped-out racing machine – race leader Morpheus (39ft) has an all-up weight of less than three tons.

Longtime Connacht sailing mates Peirce Purcell, Donal Morrissey and Brian Sheridan join the throng to make the RB&I participants very welcome in GalwayLongtime Connacht sailing mates Peirce Purcell, Donal Morrissey and Brian Sheridan join the throng to make the RB&I participants very welcome in Galway

As the course involved some deviating around the multiple TSS areas off Land’s End and the Isles of Scilly, almost inevitably there were some infringements with protests outstanding. Until they are resolved all we can currently say for certain is that Morpheus (as predicted here on Sunday) is the line honours winner for all divisions in Stage 1, with Hissy Fit second, while in the mono-hulls Ross Hobson’s Open 60 Pegasus was ahead as expected, but it was the Sunfast 3300 Orbit (Dominic Bowns) which provided something of a surprise for larger craft by coming second.

After a long and sometimes slow windward slugging match getting to the turn at the Blasket Islands yesterday (Tuesday) morning in the first Plymouth-Galway stage of the Round Britain & Ireland 2022, Andrew Fennell's Shuttleworth 39 trimaran Morpheus revelled in the nor'west wind's reaching conditions from Inishtearaght to Galway Bay and came zapping up past the Cliffs of Moher at speeds topping 17 knots to lengthen away from the still-beating Dazcat 46 Hissy Fit and finish with a massively clear margin at 17:02 hrs yesterday (Tuesday) evening.

Andy Fennell, skipper of Morpheus (pictured centre), line honours boat in the Round Britain and Ireland race being welcomed into Galway by GBSC's Fergal Lyons (left) and John Killeen, Chairman of RNLI Ireland and the Marine InstituteAndy Fennell, skipper of Morpheus (pictured centre), line honours boat in the Round Britain and Ireland race being welcomed into Galway by GBSC's Fergal Lyons (left) and John Killeen, Chairman of RNLI Ireland and the Marine Institute

Breakfast at the Blaskets. Winner's evening pints in the Commander Bill King Centre in Galway. All on the same day. And all achieved under sail.

That's doing the business and no mistake.

At 0846 this (Tuesday) morning, Andrew Fennell’s 39ft Shuttleworth trimaran Morpheus put in what her crew hope will be her final tack westward of the Blasket Islands, and found they could finally lay the course for Galway in the Round Britain & Ireland Race after slugging into headwinds from the northerly arc for most of the way from the Isles of Scilly.

Until reaching Scilly, they’d frequently enjoyed fair winds south of Cornwall and – as expected – had opened an on-water lead on the entire fleet. But crossing the western approaches of the Celtic Sea, the wind increasingly stayed stubbornly ahead, and the entire west coast of Kerry has provided one long windward struggle.

Nevertheless Morpheus coped with it better than any other boat, and firmed her lead on the DazCat 46 Hissy Fit, while in the mono-hulls Ross Hobson’ Open 60 Pegasus took her expected place in front, though it has to be said that an extremely good performance is being put in by Dominic Bowns’ little Sunfast 3300 Orbit.

Golden oldie. The veteran S&S34 Olbia (Christian Chalendre & Pascal Body) is racing for France in the RB & I. Photo Paul Gibbins, courtesy RWYCGolden oldie. The veteran S&S34 Olbia (Christian Chalendre & Pascal Body) is racing for France in the RB & I. Photo Paul Gibbins, courtesy RWYC

Meanwhile, at Galway Docks a volunteer group of GBSC members finished their work last night (Monday), transforming “The Grey Shed” into the “Commander Bill King Clubhouse” as a dockside hospitality suite for the Genesys-sponsored Galway stopover.

With the competitors in the RB&I obliged to observe a mandatory 48-hour stopover at each of the three ports of call, and with leader Morpheus expected tonight despite lightning breezes, it will be a lengthy process. The tail-ender Mea, a Vertue 2, is still almost within sight of the Isles of Scilly, so it’s likely the Commander Bill King Clubhouse will be active right through the Bank Holiday Weekend as boats and crews come and go in their alloted slots

Race Tracker below

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