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Displaying items by tag: Salmon

New evidence is indicating that wild salmon are adapting to climate change by feeding in colder waters, The Irish Times reports.
According to salmon expert Dr Ken Whelan, wild salmon are now diving as far as 800m below the surface - normally the preserve of the sperm whale - to feed for periods of up to 24 hours during winter months.
They are also travelling closer to the polar ice fields, in response to the warming of the Atlantic Ocean.
The change in behaviour was noted at a salmon summit in France attended by more than 100 fishery managers and scientists from across Europe, which was convened to discuss the threat of climate change to wild salmon stocks at sea.
Plankton levels are particularly affected by the changing wind and ocean currents, said Dr Whelan of findings from the EU-funded Salsea programme, which he led.
“Surviving the first winter at sea seems to be the key challenge for these stocks, and the salmon in the northern states like Norway and Russia, seems to be less affected,” he said.
But the recent return of wild salmon to the Tolka in Dublin, as well as healthy returns along other inland waterways, highlighted that the news was not all doom and gloom.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

New evidence is indicating that wild salmon are adapting to climate change by feeding in colder waters, The Irish Times reports.

According to salmon expert Dr Ken Whelan, wild salmon are now diving as far as 800m below the surface - normally the preserve of the sperm whale - to feed for periods of up to 24 hours during winter months.

They are also travelling closer to the polar ice fields, in response to the warming of the Atlantic Ocean.

The change in behaviour was noted at a salmon summit in France attended by more than 100 fishery managers and scientists from across Europe, which was convened to discuss the threat of climate change to wild salmon stocks at sea.

Plankton levels are particularly affected by the changing wind and ocean currents, said Dr Whelan of findings from the EU-funded Salsea programme, which he led.

“Surviving the first winter at sea seems to be the key challenge for these stocks, and the salmon in the northern states like Norway and Russia, seems to be less affected,” he said.

But the recent return of wild salmon to the Tolka in Dublin, as well as healthy numbers along other inland waterways, highlighted that the news was not all doom and gloom.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Fishing
Atlantic salmon have joined four other native fish on a 'red list' of endangered species compiled by the Ireland's fisheries and wildlife agencies.
As the Irish Independent reports, one third of the State's 15 native fish species are considered endangered or vulnerable.
One of the worst hit is the European eel, which was found to be critically endangered.
In a report published yesterday, a number of threats were highlighted such as water pollution, invasive species, overfishing, poor river management and climate change.
According to The Irish Times, the Red List was compiled by scientists from organisations across the island including Inland Fisheries Ireland, the National Parks and Wildlife Service, the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and the National Biodiversity Data Centre.
The news comes just a few days after Dublin celebrated the return of wild Atlantic salmon to the River Tolka after more than a century.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Atlantic salmon have joined four other native fish on a 'red list' of endangered species compiled by the Ireland's fisheries and wildlife agencies.

As the Irish Independent reports, one third of the State's 15 native fish species are considered endangered or vulnerable.

One of the worst hit is the European eel, which was found to be critically endangered.

In a report published yesterday, a number of threats were highlighted such as water pollution, invasive species, overfishing, poor river management and climate change.

According to The Irish Times, the Red List was compiled by scientists from organisations across the island including Inland Fisheries Ireland, the National Parks and Wildlife Service, the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and the National Biodiversity Data Centre.

The news comes just a few days after Dublin celebrated the return of wild Atlantic salmon to the River Tolka after more than a century.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling
Dublin has yet another thing to celebrate with the news that wild Atlantic salmon have returned to what was long regarded as the dirtiest of the capital's inland waterways.
The Irish Independent reports that the fish have been spotted along the banks of the Tolka between Glasnevin and Finglas for the first time in at least 100 years.
Efforts to clean the river in recent years, as well as the removal of man-made weirs, are thought to have aided the recovery of the Tolka, which now provides plentiful nutrients for migratory fish.
Atlantic salmon in particular are considered by scientists to be a 'bio-indicator' in that they require a very high standard of water, so their presence in a given area defines it as a healthy environment.
The Tolka joins the Liffey and the Dodder in the list of Dublin rivers hosting thriving stocks of young fry in what has been a bumper year for salmon angling across the country.
The Irish Independent has more on the story HERE.

Dublin has yet another thing to celebrate with the news that wild Atlantic salmon have returned to what was long regarded as the dirtiest of the capital's inland waterways.

The Irish Independent reports that the fish have been spotted along the banks of the Tolka between Glasnevin and Finglas for the first time in at least 100 years.

Efforts to clean the river in recent years, as well as the removal of man-made weirs, are thought to have aided the recovery of the Tolka, which now provides plentiful nutrients for migratory fish.

Atlantic salmon in particular are considered by scientists to be a 'bio-indicator' in that they require a very high standard of water, so their presence in a given area defines it as a healthy environment.

The Tolka joins the Liffey and the Dodder in the list of Dublin rivers hosting thriving stocks of young fry in what has been a bumper year for salmon angling across the country.

The Irish Independent has more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling
2nd September 2011

Welcome Boon for the River Moy

The New York Times recently paid a visit to the River Moy in Co Sligo, where angling has experienced a resurgance in recent years.
Since the ban on drift netting off Irish shores in 2007, salmon numbers in the Moy have risen to 75,000 annually, according to Inland Fisheries Ireland.
It's a welcome boon for the River Moy, which also suffered the effects of dregding for agricultural purposes in the 1960s which "cripped much of the integrity of the river’s substrata away, creating the equivalent of a featureless canal through much of its course."
Weirs and spawning gravel in tributary streams have helped the Moy to recover some of its former glory, and the river now welcomes thousands of anglers each year - especially to the top spots in Ballina town centre.
The New York Times has more on the story HERE.

The New York Times recently paid a visit to the River Moy in Co Sligo, where angling has experienced a resurgance in recent years.

Since the ban on drift netting off Irish shores in 2007, salmon numbers in the Moy have risen to 75,000 annually, according to Inland Fisheries Ireland.

It's a welcome boon for the River Moy, which also suffered the effects of dregding for agricultural purposes in the 1960s which "cripped much of the integrity of the river’s substrata away, creating the equivalent of a featureless canal through much of its course."

Weirs and spawning gravel in tributary streams have helped the Moy to recover some of its former glory, and the river now welcomes thousands of anglers each year - especially to the top spots in Ballina town centre.

The New York Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling
DiscoverIreland guest blogger Kirsten Fruit has posted a quick guide highlighting Ireland's abundance of world-class angling spots.
"For years, fishing fanatics from around the world have found a haven of sorts in Ireland’s waterways," she writes, "and it isn’t hard to see why."
Ireland has it all, from deep-sea angling for bass or cod to trout or salmon fishing on rivers and lakes.
But it's not just for the experts, as there are many excellent angling guides throughout the country who make a business out of introducing newcomers to the sport.
"Having a guide adds 100 percent to an individual’s enjoyment on the river," says Ballynahinch Castle's master ghillie Simon Ashe.
DiscoverIreland has more on the story, including guides' favourite angling spots, HERE.

DiscoverIreland guest blogger Kirsten Fruit has posted a quick guide highlighting Ireland's abundance of world-class angling spots.

"For years, fishing fanatics from around the world have found a haven of sorts in Ireland’s waterways," she writes, "and it isn’t hard to see why."

Ireland has it all, from deep-sea angling for bass or cod to trout or salmon fishing on rivers and lakes.

But it's not just for the experts, as there are many excellent angling guides throughout the country who make a business out of introducing newcomers to the sport.

"Having a guide adds 100 percent to an individual’s enjoyment on the river," says Ballynahinch Castle's master ghillie Simon Ashe.

DiscoverIreland has more on the story, including guides' favourite angling spots, HERE.

Published in Angling
Some 17 projects have been approved for funding under the Salmon Conservation Fund, The Irish Times reports.
The pilot scheme by Inland Fisheries Ireland is designed to help angling clubs and fishery owners restore salmon stocks in Ireland's rivers.
The successful applicants across 11 counties will receive a share from more than €120,000 derived from salmon licence-holder contributions.
Accepted projects include spawning enhancement, bank protection, fish passage and habitat improvement. Priority was given to rivers below conservation limits.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Some 17 projects have been approved for funding under the Salmon Conservation Fund, The Irish Times reports.

The pilot scheme by Inland Fisheries Ireland is designed to help angling clubs and fishery owners restore salmon stocks in Ireland's rivers.

The successful applicants across 11 counties will receive a share from more than €120,000 derived from salmon licence-holder contributions.

Accepted projects include spawning enhancement, bank protection, fish passage and habitat improvement. Priority was given to rivers below conservation limits. 

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Inland Waterways
Anglers have been treated to unprecedented fishing on Mayo's River Moy of late, the river experiencing the best run of spring salmon in years.

Eddie O'Connor (left of image) of Dublin caught this magnificent specimen spring salmon of 9.2kg (20lbs 4oz) at Foxford fishery on the Moy in late May. Foxford fishery ghillie Vincent McDonnell is pictured right.

salmon

Published in Angling
Irish boatowners and fishermen have been urged to remain alert to the prospect of so-called 'killer shrimp' invading Ireland's waters.
The dikerogammarus villosus shrimp - which has spread aggressively throughout Europe in the past decade and was discovered in England last year - could have "dire consequences" for the biodiversity of Ireland's rivers and lakes.
Kevin Flannery of Dingle Oceanworld told the Sunday Independent: "These invasive species are very aggressive and take over from the native species - and change the whole environment and ecosystem."
The killer shrimp is larger that its native cousin, making it a more deadly predator. It is known to attack insect larvae, baby fish and native shrimp.
"The shrimp will eat the primary source of food for the trout and salmon and other indigenous species which have been here for billions of years," said Flannery.
The killer shrimp has spread mainly by attaching to boat hulls at the larval stage, promping Flannery to urge all fishermen and boatowners to disinfect their vessels before using them in Irish waterways.

Irish boatowners and fishermen on inland waterways have been urged to remain alert to the prospect of so-called 'killer shrimp' invading Ireland's waters.

The dikerogammarus villosus shrimp - which has spread aggressively throughout Europe in the past decade and was discovered in England last year - could have "dire consequences" for the biodiversity of Ireland's rivers and lakes.

Kevin Flannery of Dingle Oceanworld told the Sunday Independent: "These invasive species are very aggressive and take over from the native species - and change the whole environment and ecosystem."

The killer shrimp is larger that its native cousin, making it a more deadly predator. It is known to attack insect larvae, baby fish and native shrimp.

"The shrimp will eat the primary source of food for the trout and salmon and other indigenous species which have been here for billions of years," said Flannery.

The killer shrimp has spread mainly by attaching to boat hulls at the larval stage, promping Flannery to urge all fishermen and boatowners to disinfect their vessels before using them in Irish waterways.

Published in Inland Waterways
9th February 2011

Kerry Fishermen Want Seal Cull

Kerry fishermen are calling for a cull of the local grey seal population over claims that they eat up to 10kg of fish a day, The Irish Times reports.
Fishermen along the Kerry coast are arguing the the seals are "over-protected", are too great in number and are posing a threat to salmon conservation, as well as depleting stocks of hake and pollock.
Concerns are on the rise that seals will be culled illegally if there is no official intervention on the matter. However, the National Parks and Wildlife Service has ruled out any action.
Locals in the Blasket Islands have claimed that more than 1,200 seals inhabit the area. Research by the Seal Track programme showed only 400 seals in the Blaskets in 2003, down over 40% from 1998 numbers.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Kerry fishermen are calling for a cull of the local grey seal population over claims that they eat up to 10kg of fish a day, The Irish Times reports on marine animals.

Fishermen along the Kerry coast are arguing the the seals are "over-protected", are too great in number and are posing a threat to salmon conservation, as well as depleting stocks of hake and pollock.

Concerns are on the rise that seals will be culled illegally if there is no official intervention on the matter. However, the National Parks and Wildlife Service has ruled out any action.

Locals in the Blasket Islands have claimed that more than 1,200 seals inhabit the area. Research by the Seal Track programme showed only 400 seals in the Blaskets in 2003, down over 40% from 1998 numbers.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Marine Wildlife
Salmon farmers have been reminded of the dangers of egg-bearing lice, despite a "sustained reduction" in their numbers according to a new report.
"Pest control will always remain a challenge requiring active management," said Minister of State for Fisheries Sean Connick, as quoted by The Irish Times.
The minister spoke at the launch of a report by the National Implementation Group (NIG) for improving pest control in Ireland's salmon farms.
The report noted that the majority of facilities maintained lice level below trigger levels for treatment, and where treatment was necessary it was conducted effectively.
In response to the report, Salmon Watch Ireland (SWI) claims that the risks to wild salmonids "by inadequately regulated salmon farming" are being ignored, threatening juvenile salmon and sea trout.
It also highlighted the fact that Ireland is being pushed by the European Commission to conform salmon farming to EU Habitats Directive standards for wild salmon.
"The reality is that the regulation of the salmon farming industry is a shambles," said the SWI in a statement.
The Irish Times has more on this story HERE.

Salmon farmers have been reminded of the dangers of egg-bearing lice, despite a "sustained reduction" in their numbers according to a new report.

"Pest control will always remain a challenge requiring active management," said Minister of State for Fisheries Sean Connick, as quoted by The Irish Times.

The minister spoke at the launch of a report by the National Implementation Group (NIG) for improving pest control in Ireland's salmon farms. 

The report noted that the majority of facilities maintained lice level below trigger levels for treatment, and where treatment was necessary it was conducted effectively.

In response to the report, Salmon Watch Ireland (SWI) claims that the risks to wild salmonids "by inadequately regulated salmon farming" are being ignored, threatening juvenile salmon and sea trout.

It also highlighted the fact that Ireland is being pushed by the European Commission to conform salmon farming to EU Habitats Directive standards for wild salmon.

"The reality is that the regulation of the salmon farming industry is a shambles," said the SWI in a statement.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling
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