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Displaying items by tag: Fishing

#GALWAY BAY - Galway Bay FM reports that the National Parks and Wildlife Service is to work with the Marine Institute towards completing a management plan for Galway Bay.

It comes two weeks after a group of oyster fishermen met Minister for Natural Resources Pat Rabbitte at Leinster House to voice their concerns over a cap on oyster dredging licences.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, local fishermen in the inner Galway Bay-Clarinbridge area are concerned that their livelihoods are at risk after the European Union ruled that there is over-intensification of fishing at the oyster bed.

Only 13 dredging licences have been issued this year, and EU Directives prevent their further issue until a fisheries management plan is introduced.

Galway West Senator Fidelma Healy-Eames says steps are being made to get the management plan on track.

Published in Galway Harbour

#RESCUELifeboat crew with Howth RNLI spent over ten hours on Saturday (4 February 2012) assisting a 17 metre fishing tralwer, with seven crew onboard, 36 miles north east of Howth, which was rapidly taking on water.

Howth RNLI were requested to launch their all weather lifeboat to the fishing vessel at 1.08 pm on Saturday afternoon and it would be nearly ten and a half hours later when they returned to the harbour with the casualty vessel under tow.

The Irish Coast Helicopter were also on scene to help the stricken vessel and a winchman delivered a salvage pump onboard to help the crew try and staunch the water.  With the lifeboat on scene the Coast Guard helcopter returned to base and the lifeboat crew worked quickly to establish a tow in difficult conditions.  Weather was force six with a strong southerly wind.

Keeping the casualty vessel under tow in bad conditions proved challenging and the rope parted a couple of times.  Sixteen miles north east of Howth the fishing crew reported that the water coming into the vessel was increasing and the tow was stopped.  A lifeboat crewmember was transferred onto the fishing trawler and a new salvage pump was put onboard.  The source of the leak was identified and action taken to stem the flow of water.  The lifeboat once again undertook the tow and eventually arrived into Howth harbour at 10.25pm.  All crew onboard the fishing vessel were unhurt.

Commenting on the callout Howth RNLI crewmember Dave Howard said, " This was a long callout for our all weather lifeboat crew.  Condtions were not great offshore and going from the lifeboat onto the casualty vessel in a two to three metre swell was very challenging.  However when a fishing vessel reports taking on water, it is vital to make sure that the crew are safe and that the tow does not part.  We are relieved that all crew got home safe."

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#FISHING - Fishermen from Galway met Minister for Natural Resources Pat Rabbitte at Leinster House yesterday to voice their concerns over a cap on oyster dredging licences, Galway Bay FM reports.

Local fishermen in the inner Galway Bay-Clarinbridge area are concerned that their livelihoods are at risk after the European Union ruled that there is over-intensification of fishing at the oyster bed.

Only 13 dredging licences have been issued this year, and EU Directives prevent their further issue until a fisheries management plan is introduced.

Published in Fishing

#RESCUE - The Irish Times reports that the search has resumed for a fisherman who fell overboard from a trawler in the Irish Sea yesterday.

The crewman of the Kilkeel-registered fishing vessel Zenith was reported missing some nine miles (14.5km) off Clogherhead, Co Louth.

Yesterday afternoon the Irish Coast Guard and Clogherhead RNLI began an air and sea search and rescue effort, assisted by coastguard helicopter and other lifeboats and vessels in the area.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Rescue

#ANGLING - The Irish Specimen Fish Committee's annual report for 2011 features catch details for 587 specimen fish as well as four new records, according to The Irish Times.

The report comes ahead of the committee's annual awards event at the Red Cow Moran Hotel in Dublin on Saturday 3 March, recogising those anglers who work hard to catch and record the biggest fish of each of Ireland's species.

Those in line for awards include Terry Jackson, who caught a 2.1kh roach/rudd hybrid in the River Lagan; Dutchman Jan Vrieswijk who landed a 1.33kh blackmouth dogfish in Red Bay, Co Antrim; and Noel Lane for his 2.83kg thin-lipped mullet from Cork Harbour.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling

#ANGLING - Northern Ireland's taxpayers could be left with a bill for millions in EU fines if action isn't taken to reverse the decline of salmon stocks, the News Letter reports.

Ulster Unionist MLA Robin Swann said he believes that voluntary measures to help protect the North's Altantic salmon will not remove the threat of "fines which would likely run into millions which [the people of NI] will end up paying".

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, NI's Fisheries Minister Carál Ní Chuilín called on offshore anglers and commercial fishermen to forego applying for 2012 salmon licences.

Annual monitoring of the North's salmon rivers has shown a failure to reach targets most years since 2002, with the survival rate of salmon in the marine phases in some cases dropping to as little as 5%.

Coastal drift nets and bag nets off the north Antrim coast - which contravene EU directives - have been blamed for intercepting salmon stocks before they reach the rivers, and anglers and conservation groups have already called for a ban.

But Swann says that Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL) does not yet have the legislative power to stop them.

The News Letter has more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling

#MARINE NOTICE - The latest Marine Notice from the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport (DTTAS) advises on rock placement operations offshore at North Beach in Rush, Co Dublin and in the Irish Sea.

Works commenced on 19 January to continue for around 14 days, subject to weather delays, undertaken by DPFPV Tideway Rollingstone (call sign PHYR) which is operating on a 24-hour basis.

The vessel is transmitting an AIS signal and will be keeping a listening watch on VHF Channel 16 at all times. It is also displaying appropriate day shapes and lights.

The works - which involve the deployment of survey ROV and fall pipe - will restrict the vessel's ability to manoeuvre, so all vessels in the vicinity (particular fishing boats) have been given warning to give the vessel and her equipment a wide berth.

Complete details including co-ordinates of work areas are included in Marine Notice No 4 of 2012, a PDF of which is available to read and download HERE.

Published in Marine Warning

#NEWS UPDATE - The search is set to resume again this morning for the three fishermen not yet recovered after their trawler sank off West Cork last Sunday.

Skipper Michael Hayes and Egyptian crewmen Saied Ali Eldin and Wael Mohammed have been missing since the fishing vessel Tit Bonhomme ran aground and went down in rough seas near Adam's Rock, at the mouth of Glandore Harbour.

Only one of the six-person crew, 43-year-old Abdul Mohammed, is confirmed alive after he was able to reach the shore immediately following the incident.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, Garda divers retrieved the body of Attia Shaban (26) on Thursday morning, followed in the afternoon by that of Kevin Kershaw (21).

Yesterday the search was expanded to cover an 18-mile radius after a dive at the wreck site was unsuccessful, according to The Irish Times.

Divers from the Garda and Naval Service will continue to focus on the wreck today, helped by favourable weather conditions, while volunteers join in the wider search of the coastline.

It emerged on Friday that that boat's aluminium wheelhouse sheared off in the rough seas that followed for three days after it ran aground.

RTÉ News has video of the search operation in progress HERE.

Published in News Update

#MCIB - The decision to set out in poor weather, coupled with limited safety instruction, led to the tragic death of a Romanian angler on Lough Mask last summer, according to a report by the Marine Casualty Investigation Board (MCIB).

Mircea Ungur drowned after the angling boat he was in capsized in choppy waters brought on by squalling Force 8 winds on the afternoon of 8 May 2011.

Ungur had a tracheostomy tube in his throat resulting from a previous battle against throat cancer, and drowned after taking in water through this tube, the MCIB concluded. It was also found that most of his companions and the guide knew nothing about the tube.

At the time of the incident, Ungur had been on an angling holiday in Co Mayo with five colleagues accompanied by a fishing guide. On the morning of 8 May the group set out from Cappaduff in Tourmakeady on two boats, following a brief discussion about fishing and safe departure from the pier.

Winds were already reaching Force 4-6 when the group departed and sought a sheltered area of the lough to fish. After lunch winds had picked up to Force 8 and the guide signalled for a return to Tourmakeady.

At around 1.5km from the pier at Cappaduff, a wave swamped the leading boat that contained Ungur, a companion and the guide. All three on board, who were wearing buoyancy aids, went into the water.

Ungur was the first taken on board the other boat after some 10 minutes in the water. He was not moving or communicating with the others, and CPR was not administered until the boat reached the shore 20 minutes later. Ungur was pronouced dead just before 3pm.

The report concluded that the group had departed despite reservations among them about the poor weather, which had been correctly forecast that day. There was also little discussion with the anglers about their level of boating experience, the weather, or any disabilities that would affect their safety on the water.

The MCIB recommended that a full safety briefing should be given to all those hiring angling boats. It also urged the enforcement of safety regulations and certification for recreational water craft.

The full report is available to download as a PDF from the MCIB website HERE.

Published in MCIB

#FISHING – New Zealand's Stabicraft Marine has delivered nine custom 659 Wheel House vessels to Alaska where they will be used as observation boats to monitor the gill net fishery and the fishery's interaction with sea mammals and sea birds. They look like practical boats similar in concept to Rigid inlfatables (RIBS) used in this country such as Ireland's own pioneering Red Bay Boats Cabin RIbs and also the Garda Siochana Water Unit's Delta Cabin RIBs currently deployed in Glandore Bay.

The vessel orders came at a special request from Saltwater Inc, a private organization that gathers data on wild life and fish stocks for the Alaskan Department of Fish and Game and by the National Marine Fisheries Service.

The order is a coup for New Zealand based Stabicraft Marine, as the vessels had to meet stringent US criteria. Stabicraft as a manufacturer came under intense scrutiny for being a non US company as well as having to have an independent Marine Surveyor assess Stabicraft's design - ultimately endorsing their design and build.

Stabicraft 659WH

The Stabicraft 659 Wheel House destined for fishery monitoring duties in Alaska

"Saltwater, Inc. located in Anchorage, Alaska, has ordered the vessels as part of a US federal government contract with national marine fisheries. It will last for the next two summers and will be located in the Petersburg-Wrangell area of southeast Alaska," says Stabicraft Marine Managing Director, Paul Adams.

Each boat will have an operator and observer onboard, some days the vessels and their operators will need to travel a total of 80 miles in all conditions and will be observing fishing vessels in the gill net fishery.

The vessels will be used in a variety of roles, mainly based around rivers and estuaries and offshore work.

"This is a significant order for Stabicraft. It has traditionally been very difficult for non-US boat manufacturers to supply vessels to be used in government projects. Its a real coup."

"We are led to believe that this is a high profile operation and everyone in the area will be watching these boats. Even though, they will be used in the inside waters of southeast Alaska, there are many days that the wind whips the seas up and the performance of these will be tested."

Each of the nine 659 Wheel House vessels had to meet stringent design and performance requirements such as visibility, stability and strength to cope with the often treacherous water conditions of Alaska.

Like all Stabicrafts, safety is a key feature. The 659 Wheel House features continuous tubes of individually sealed flotation chambers providing a 'Life Ring' of 2276 liters (601 gallons) of buoyancy on the upper-outer extremities of the boat. With the addition of an airtight chamber between the floor and the hull, these boats are virtually unsinkable. At rest, the GII Pontoon design sits in the water, giving increased stability for when the observers are moving around the forward cockpit.

Visibility is served by 6mm toughened glass all round the aft wheelhouse, with access to the cabin itself via full-length glass sliding twin doors front and rear of the cabin. To provide extra room for passenger comfort in the cabin, the cabin itself is wider at shoulder height than the gunnels.

Extra emphasis has been placed on the gunnel height of the vessels and was designed at 873mm (34in). The Stabicraft design team incorporated high gunnels to not only keep passengers safe when out on deck, but also would see the vessel being less likely to take on water and be safer.

"Stabicrafts are already inherently very strong and the pontoon design adds a lot of rigidity. On these particular 659 Wheel House vessels, this has been enhanced by the use of 6mm plate alloy for the hull, 4mm for the pontoons and 4mm for the cabin."

"The positive buoyancy tubes offer 'life-ring' security, the Saltwater Inc observers are going to be very, very safe when out on the job.'

The 9 Stabicraft vessels will begin on water operations in the coming weeks.

Stabicraft 659 Wheel House Specifications:

Length Overall: 6893mm (22.6ft)

External Beam: 2361mm (7.7ft)

Internal Beam: 1700mm (5.5ft)

Gunnel Height: 873mm (2.8ft)

Cabin Height: 1988mm (6.5ft)

Cabin Width: 1842mm (6.0ft)

Fuel Capacity: 284litres (75 Gallons)

Vessel Weight: Approx 1100kg (2,425lbs)

Max Persons: 7

Max Persons Weight: 495kg (1092lbs)

Max Load (Persons, Motors, Gear): 958kg (2113lbs)

Motor Max Hp: 2x 150hp outboards

 

Published in Fishing
Page 44 of 51

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