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Displaying items by tag: Jeanine Johnston

#ShiftingBerths – One of Dublin’s floating tourist visitor attractions on the Liffey, tallship Jeanie Johnston which reopened after a historic drydocking, has still yet to return to her customary city-centre berth, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Jeanie Johnston a replica of a 19th century famine-emigrant tallship had been expected to be towed back to her berth on Custom House Quay. The reason is due to temporary interim closures of the Samuel Becket swing-bridge because of maintenance. Before that the barque as planned was initially given a temporary berth just beyond the Tom Clark lift-bridge (see report photo).

As previously reported on Afloat Jeanie Johnston was to shift berths to Sir John Rogerson Quay. This has since been carried out with tours of the tallship currently available along this southside quay. The tallship is downriver of the distinctive orange coloured Diving Bell which was preserved in recent years. 

The museum tallship operator website advises that tour tickets remain on sale at Custom House Quay. A walk of around five minutes from Sir John Rogersons Quay.

The tours explains the role of the original Jeanie Johnston that made 16 emigrant journeys from Ireland to North America between 1847 and 1855. In that time, Jeanie Johnston transported over 2,500 people with no loss of life.

After March 10th, the tours will commence when the ‘Jeanie’ shift berths upriver. This will involve the final leg of a short hop back ‘home’ to the northside’s Custom House Quay.

Jeanie Johnston, the replica that is was built in Blennerville outside Tralee, Co. Kerry. In 2003 she sailed to North America on a tour of ports along the US and Canadian east coast. The historic re-enactment drew considerable positive media attention overseas. This in stark contrast to domestic criticism before the tour arising over high cost-overuns in constructing the replica.

Following her return from the North American tour she made several visits to ports in western Europe. Also day sails in Dublin Bay were run before her short-lived sailing career ended.

The barque was acquired in 2005 by her previous owners the Dublin Docklands Development Authority. The DDDA began using the tallship as a museum ship for the next five years.

Since 2010 Galway-based company Aiseanna Mara Teoranta were appointed to continue operating the ship as a museum.

Published in Tall Ships

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