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Displaying items by tag: 1720

#1720 – The popular West Cork sailing Village of Baltimore will next month play host to the 1720 National Championships which will be sailed in the picturesque setting of Roaring water Bay. The event is sponsored by Danske Bank. The Cork harbour 1720 Sportsboat fleet is still going strong in Ireland and with boats travelling down from Dublin, Crosshaven and even the UK to join the large local fleet already based in Baltimore.

The 2015 1720 National Championships will be organised by the Baltimore Sailing Club (BSC) in conjunction with the 1720 Sportsboat Class Association from Thursday 18th to Saturday 20th June 2015.

This year's event looks to be attracting around some 20 entries, a weekend ahead of the ICRA Nationals and Sovereign's Cup Kinsale. As well as the great racing agenda,  the 1720 class say there are good après-sail activities planned for the evenings including a big BBQ on the last night at the recently extended and renovated clubhouse of BSC. NOR and entry forms available for download below.

Published in 1720

#1720 – The 1720 Sportboat 'Heroes and Villains' shot this onboard video of some high speed sailing in Cork harbour yesterday. According to the sailors, they reached a top speed of 20.3 knots in the Tony Castro designed sportsboat in wind speeds of 28–knots gusting to 35! Nice gybe!
This year the resurgent class hosts its National Championships at Baltimore Sailing Club from 18-20 June and its European Championships at Royal Cork Yacht Club from 3-5 September.

Published in 1720

#dbsc – Greeted with a foggy Dublin Bay yesterday morning and a gentle breeze due to a huge high pressure sitting over Ireland, team INSS were one of the first boats to head out to the DBSC Spring Chicken race course in a lovely 10-12 knots of breeze writes Kenneth Rumball. Our crew were keen to get to grips with the intricacies of handling the mast head spinnaker on our race prepared 1720 prior to the start of racing, giving us the best possible opportunity to win the day's race.

A great race course was set with a start line just off the harbour mouth and a 'Z' style course incorporating a laid weather mark, yellow mark as gybe mark, another laid gybe mark and then the pin end of the line as the leeward which we had to round to starboard. The 1720 fleet as always started in the third start with a biased committee boat end. Team INSS gave a lesson on how to control the fleet on a committee boat start and won the highly competitive start.

Up the first beat Merlin pulled ahead due to her dominant speed with Third Time Lucky also having a speed edge. Lady A from the RIYC rounded in third place with Team INSS rounding in fourth. A fumbled hoist saw Team INSS catching a few mackerel n anticipation for lunch, however the tem didn't lose too much and was soon catching the rest of the fleet.

On approach to the yellow mark there were many discussion on whether or not the 1720s could hold their kite on the tight reach, the small Sonata 'Asterix' had showed the fleet it can be done. All the 1720s apart from Merlin took the risk and tried to hold the kites which was to be a mistake. Merlin used the advantage and increased their lead as the remainder of the fleet struggled to douse kites on the fetch.

Team INSS also benefitted from some slick spinnaker work and was up to second place by the second gybe mark.

Despite their best efforts TEAM INSS could not manage to hold off Lady A even though at the finish there was barely two seconds between the hooters as the two 1720s cross the line.

Back ashore in the INSS centre we had a busy day with a full First Aid course for dinghy instructors as well as an ISA Dinghy Instructor Pre-Entry Assessment run by ISA Regional Development Officer Ciaran Murphy where all 7 candidates passed.

The afternoon saw our dinghy sailors out sailing in the DMYC Frostbites.

Published in DBSC
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#dbscturkeyshoot – One could have been forgiven for having a severe case of déjà vu yesterday morning as the DBSC Turkey Shoot had almost the exact same conditions as in the previous weeks racing writes INSC's Kenneth Rumball. The wind was from a similar direction, however this week being more westerly than southerly and also a change in race officer with Henry Leonard taking the reins this week. A similar course was laid, to last week with a short beat to a laid weather mark followed by a short reach to the yellow outfall mark and from there to another laid mark in Scotsman's bay and then down to the Muglins Island again before passing the other marks in reverse order back to a finish at the outfall mark.

The startline was a much more disciplined affair in the third fleet as opposed to the last two weeks with the entire fleet getting away cleanly. The 1720s mostly took a course in towards the Harbour to gain a valuable windbend up the course. A tight weather mark saw Brian Matthews and team round first with the remaining 1720s separated by inches bow to stern along the top reach. With such a tighly packed fleet, the hoist at thenext mark was going to be crucial, tack lines pulled on too early saw the RIYC's Lady A and Brian Matthews pair trawling for some Dublin Bay Mackerel.

Slowing these tow boats down and with some start 2 traffic, 6 1720s were neck n neck racing down the West Pier INSC1 and INSC2 Kenneth and Alexander skippering each were praising their crews on the race training programme for providing excellent spinnaker handling and trimming to keep the boats up at the top of the fleet.

The initial downwind saw the boats stay quite tight until the mark set just off the 40 foot where the fleet split, the Royal St George's Merlin and Lady A from the RIYC went out to sea in search of more wind while Brian Matthews kept close to shore. INSC1, INSC2 and Niall O'Neills 1720 kept to the middle putting in a few more gybes than the rest. At the Muglins, It was apparent that hugging the side was the right call with Brian Matthews rounding first, followed by the RIYC's Lady A, Merlin, INSC2, INSC 1 and Niall O'Neill and team popping around.

A long beat upwind saw little place changing with the final finishing order in the 1720 fleet with Brian Matthews and team claiming the win.

With two more races to go, the racing is intense as ever across the Turkey Shoot fleet.

Published in Turkey Shoot
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#turkeyshoot – The 2014 Dublin Bay Sailing Club Turkey Shoot Series sees the third time the INSS has entered two 1720 Sportsyachts into the exciting winter series writes school principal Kenny Rumball. The 1720s are skippered by Kenneth and Alexander Rumball as part of our race training programme where we aim to teach our crews the techniques and intensity required to race at the top of the fleet. With a training weekend having been blown out the previous weekend and the reserve day being the Saturday afternoon before racing also blown out, our teams had little practise time ahead of stepping on to the boats on Sunday morning. Initial forecasts and the weather in the morning was a manageable 16-18kts.

Boats rigged, masthead spinnakers plugged in, the two teams headed out into slightly more breeze than forecast, a quick change down from mast head to fractional kites prior to the start as we now saw gusts up pas t 20kts. Both teams started well with INSC1 (Kenneth) more towards the starboard end of the line and INSC2 (Alexander) more towards the pin end of the line. Neither INSC teams made the mistake of going to the far right of the bay where the prior two fleets mistook the Flying Fifteen windward mark as our windward mark despite assurances from the committee boat that the mark was 'well left'. INSC1 sailed up the middle of the beat covering Colin Byrne and his team on RIYC and Brian Matthews skippering a 1720 from the NYC. INSC2 went the best way up the beat and went well left, popping around the top mark ahead of most of the the two fleets that started prior to us. INSC2 attempted to fly the masthead spinnaker on the top reach but were wiser and doused it before taking an early bath. INSC1 rounded as third 1720 and could not catch INSC2 or the experienced crew racing the NYC boat with Brian. The pecking order at the top of the fleet stayed much the same with Brian and his team from the NYC claiming the spot of first 1720 across the line followed by INSC2 and then INSC1. A thrilling start to the series in challenging conditions with some breakages and an injury to which both INSC teams express their best wishes to the injured crew member.

'Big Boat' racing over, and the attention turned to the DMYC Frostbite Series where for the first time, the INSC/INSS gave our club members the opportunity to race in this fantastic series in our fleet of performance dinghies backed up by on the water support and coaching and a de-brief after every race. With views from the team INSC skippers Kenneth and Alexander sailing their Fireball and RS400 respectively and on the water support given by Glyn Williams, our new programme give a unique perspective on how to improve your dinghy racing. We have four adult members sailing Laser dinghies with one of our dinghy instructors also chartering one of our lasers before forgetting the four double handers we have entered crewed by members of our Junior Club programme.

Following on from the mornings racing the conditions had somewhat moderated slightly for the afternoon. Our new racers thoroughly enjoyed the intensity of the new experience with big smiles and a steep learning curve ahead of them. Also racing were other members of our junior club in their RS Feva dinghies. All sailors enjoyed a thorough debrief after racing in the INSC Clubhouse where Kenneth gave his inside view on how to win the days race after a close battle with long time competitor Noel Butler a former INSS pupil. Alexander was able to give his view and answer questions from the perspective of the coach RIB for the day due to a parts delay for his RS400.

All our sailors then made their way to the DMYC Clubhouse for some coffees and hot soup with Carlos and Fiona behind the bar and kitchen delighted to see some new faces.

Our winter racing programmes are now full but if you are interested in these programmes, we will have some spots available after the Christmas break.

Published in Turkey Shoot

#1720 – A short video of team INSC.ie Irish National Sailing Club racing in the 1720 Europeans in Howth Yacht Club in June this year. Powered by UK McWilliam Sailmakers, the team with two of INSC's race training skippers on board fought off tough competition from Cork sailors to claim third place on the podium in their first 1720 event.

Published in 1720
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#hyc – Howth Yacht Club's new Sportsboat initiative attracted J24s, J80s and the visiting 1720 European championships for its first outing last weekend.

 Well known cJ24 skipper  Flor O’Driscoll and the crew of his J24 Hard On Port were the deserving overall Sportsboat Cup winners for 2014 and were awarded the Romaine Cagney Trophy.

Impressively, they did not count a result worse than second for the regatta and won half of the races. The popular winners have been stalwarts of the J24 class in Ireland who also have won several IRC titles in the well campaigned boat. They were only delighted to be taking another piece of silverware out of the Pale to Munster.

The  cup was sailed in three days of glorious sunshine and light winds. Suncream and water were some of the most important parts of all crews’ kit every day as temperatures were consistently over 20 degrees. Water was especially important after many of the competitors were burning the midnight oil each evening. Racing was successfully completed on Sunday which incorporated the 1720 Europeans, the J24 Easterns and the Sailfleet J80s. The race officers did exceptionally well to get the full schedule of races completed on both race courses without any delays. The challenging conditions and a big shift meant that the last race of the day on Saturday for the 1720s had to be abandoned to avoid it becoming a lottery. PRO Derek Bothwell’s mantra that “It is better to have no race than a bad race” was a wise one. In any case, there was ample time to make it up on Sunday morning to get all eight races in.

1720_Fleet.jpg

1720s made a welcome return to HYC after over a decade of absence

The 1720 Europeans came down to the wire and was decided in the last race to by the slimmest of margins. After a match race with Denis Murphy’s Aquatack in the last race, Peter O’Leary’s Jacobs Bar emerged victorious by just half a point overall to defend his title from last year. Not far behind the leading pair was a surprise performance from Kenneth Rumball on INSC.ie who rounded out the podium places. Maybe the Dun Laoghaire based team should travel to the events more frequently and the rest of the Dublin based fleet will too. The top performer from outside of Ireland came from Tom Forrestor-Coles and his crew from the south coast of the UK who finished fourth, just two points off the podium.

1720winners.jpg

1720 winners. Pictured Adam Hyland, Cathal Cottrell, Peter O’Leary, Jamie Donegan & Youen Jacob

O’Learys title defence was impressive as earlier this year the boat was in a sorry state after being abandoned for years in a field in Baltimore. Left under a tree with the hatch open the boat was covered in leaves, dirt and the hull was full of water. Before they began the resurrection Cathal Cottrell even joked “We thought of entering the boat in the Chelsea flower show instead of the Europeans when we found her, and we nearly did”. After only rigging a new mast on Thursday night and splashing for the first time early Friday morning, they got off to a relatively slow start but definitely got into their rhythm on Saturday and hauled in Aquatack before conclusion on Sunday. Seventeen year old Adam Hyland was a welcome addition to the crew and O’Leary praised the young talent in his acceptance speech.

Eoin_OFearghail.jpg

Eoin O’Fearghail

When the wind dropped on Saturday for the J24s and J80s racing was as rapid as Elephant Polo. The wind direction chopped and changed to the point where PRO Richard Kissane decided to abandon and restart Race 2. Whereas it didn't suit those doing nicely at the time, it was the sensible decision. The restarted race got away smartly in a bit more breeze allowing the fleet to get all scheduled races under their belts and home in time for tea and tiffin....and after-sun!

Sunday's racing was brought forward an hour to test those who were out the night before. A few cups of Blue Nun did nothing to slow up Flor O'Driscoll and his team who put in a stellar Sunday performance.
Lough Swilly's "Bandit" lived up to its name by putting in a sweet port tack start in Race 5. Open-jawed, the rest of the fleet took some time catching!

Overnight leader Stefan Hyde on Hamilton Bear had a wobbly start to the day but finished off the weekend with a well deserved bullet. In the last they weren’t able to push Hard On Port down the fleet enough in the last to snatch the overall title at the death, so it was second overall for them. Howth Yacht Club’s Under 25 Keelboat Team on Eurocarparks Kilcullen rounded out the podium in third place.

J80winners.jpg

J80 winners. Joan Harris, Gillian Guinness, Elaine Taylor, Sally Watson & Linda Darbey

In the Sailfleet J80 class Gillian Guinness and her ladies team took the title ahead of Mossy Shanahan. In the closely fought class young Ewan McMahon finished a close third. With most of the fleet trading blows Gillian and her crew were very consistent and eked out a lead which meant they had the series wrapped up with a race to spare. There were even sightings of wine and other delights on the sail home each day on board. The bulk of the fleet from second to fifth place were separated by only four points. Exactly what you want and expect from such evenly matched one design racing.

Howth would like to thank all the competitors who made the event as good as it was and Edward Dillon who generously sponsored some prizes. We hope to have everyone back and even more classes involved when we run the event again in 2016.

Full Results here: http://hyc.ie/results

Published in Howth YC

#1720 – Baltimore Sailing Club's Peter O'Leary has won the 1720 European championships by half a point at Howth Yacht Club over the weekend. O'Leary beat another Munster campaign, Denis Murphy's Aquatack, after an eight races series sailed in light and shifty conditions as part of Howth's inaugural Sportsboat Cup. Full results downloadable below as a jpg file.

The winning 1720 'Jacob's Bar' was sailed by helmsman O'Leary, a double Olympian, with crew Adam Hyland, Cathal Cohrell, Jamie Donegan and Youen Jacob.

Breaking up the Munster domination at the top of the 15–boat fleet was a Dun Laoghaire Sailing School entry skippered by Kenneth Rumball. Rumball's INSC.ie second placing in the final race yesterday afternoon put him four and a half points clear of TBSC's Ricochet.  Last Year's champion Anthony O'Leary in Antix was fifth. 

The first 'Sportsboat Cup' was completed after 3 successful days of racing incorporating the 1720 Europeans, J24 Eastern Championships and Sailfleet J80s. 

 

Published in 1720
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#hyc – With only a week to go anticipation is building for the inaugural HYC Sportsboat Cup at Howth in County Dublin writes Ross McDonald.Three fleets will be battling it out over two racecourses in what is promising to be a spectacular addition to the Irish racing calendar. Racing will begin on Friday the 20th June and run over the weekend on what is the longest day of the year.

Racing will start at midday each day but the fleets will be back on dry land in time to take advantage of the late evening sun. Post sailing music and barbeques are booked for each day along with a sailing supper by HYC's new chef Jason Dunphy (ex Rolys, Conrad and more) on offer for Friday evening. On Saturday evening there will be a midsummer celebration with a dinner dance organised so the club will certainly be a lively spot.

The 1720 Europeans will be held as part of the event which is drawing an international flavour to the racing, with boats travelling from the UK to compete for the title. This is the first time in several years that this event has been held out of the 1720 stronghold of Cork and it is giving the boats from Dublin a new lease of life. Entries are coming in from the host club as well as The Irish, The George and the INSC in Dun Laoghaire. That's not to mention all of the old heads that are popping up on some of the regulars boats to rekindle their love of the 1720 and impart some local knowledge while at it. Boats are starting to arrive this weekend with the aim of familiarising themselves with race area.

The J24 fleet will be hotly contested with several seasoned campaigners and previous regional and national champions battling it out for the title. The fleet have lots of experience racing in Howth and are returning to the battleground of last summer's Worlds and the Europeans from 2011.

The J80s will be populated with lots of notable sailors across a wide range of ages. From young Oppie champions to world match racers and everything in between this racing is promising to be memorable. With all the boats rigged and tuned identically this fleet will come down to nothing but the sailors skills.

As well as awarding fleet prizes a perpetual trophy will be awarded to the overall event winner. The details of how it will be decided will be revealed in the SI's.

There is still time to get an entry in. You can enter online here

 

Published in Howth YC
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#hyc – A Sportsboat Cup for Irish keelboat classes to be held around Midsummers day and tailored especially for 1720s, SB20s, Quarter Tonners, J24s, RS Elites, Dragons, J80s and J70s, is to be staged for the first time at Howth Yacht Club in north Dublin from 20th - 22nd June 2014.

At this multiclass event each of the sportsboat classes will be given their own start, results and prizes.

The event will incorporate the 1720 European championships as part of the event and there is an expectation of visiting UK and continental crews too.

Racing will be one design with the exception of the quarter tonners and mixed class who will race under IRC. Class rules will apply where applicable.

HYC says any other sportsboat type that has an IRC cert will also be accommodated in a mixed sportsboat fleet.

Howth is using the event to champion its sailing facilities both on the water and ashore at the 'bustling fishing village' venue that is also close to Dublin airport.

The largest club in the country has two cranes, a 300–berth marina, sizeable hardstanding, a large club house with bar, terrace and dining facilities not to mention secure changing and showering facilities

HYC is ideally placed to host this Sportsboat Cup. Car parking, craning, berthing and trailer storage are all included in the entry fee and racing will be organised by top National and International Race Officers.

With no racing starting before 12 each day there will be ample time to freshen up in the morning after the great social that is planned for each evening.

Online Entry available by clicking the HYC advert at the top of the Afloat homepage.

Published in Howth YC
Page 7 of 10

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