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Displaying items by tag: Kilmore Quay

Three anglers were recovered by the Kilmore Quay lifeboat last weekend after an engine failure on their vessel close to the Saltee Islands.
SAR Ireland reports that three males were on board the cheekily named Crafty Bitch on a fishing expedition when they got into difficulty.
They were forced to raise the alarm by phone as there was no VHF radio on board. The absence of radio and GPS made locating the vessel "very difficult", but the boat was eventually found after some delay and towed to port. All on board were wearing lifejackets.
Boat anglers are reminded to ensure they have at a bare minimum a VHF radio and GPS locator on board, as mobile phone signals can be unreliable offshore.

Three anglers were recovered by the Kilmore Quay lifeboat last weekend after an engine failure on their vessel close to the Saltee Islands.

SAR Ireland reports that three males were on board the cheekily named Crafty Bitch on a fishing expedition when they got into difficulty. 

They were forced to raise the alarm by phone as there was no VHF radio on board. The absence of radio and GPS made locating the vessel "very difficult", but the boat was eventually found after some delay and towed to port. All on board were wearing lifejackets.

Boat anglers are reminded to ensure they have at a bare minimum a VHF radio and GPS locator on board, as mobile phone signals can be unreliable offshore.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
The Kilmore Quay lifeboat crew are currently undergoing intensive training on their new €3 million Tamar lifeboat, which only arrived on station last Wednesday.  The lifeboat was on scene in twelve minutes and took the fishing vessel under tow into Kilmore Quay harbour.

Along with Coxswain Eugene Kehoe, lifeboat mechanic Brian Kehoe and two Kilmore Quay lifeboat crew were Divisional Inspector Gareth Morrison and Divisional Engineer David Murrin, who also took part in the callout. The Tamar is currently at sea every day for training to ensure all the volunteer crew members are fully trained on the new lifeboat.

Commenting on the first callout for the Tamar Deputy Divisional Inspector Gareth Morrison said,  " The new lifeboat performed superbly.  The extra speed in responding to callouts along with the improved radio direction finding equipment helped us locate the casualty vessel very quickly.  On a bad night and in challenging conditions this will make a huge difference for the lifeboat volunteers."

Over fifty percent of Kilmore Quay's callouts are to fishing vessels.  The new Tamar class lifeboat is 16.3 metres in length with a maximum speed of 25 knots compared to the 14.3 metres of the Tyne class lifeboat stationed at Kilmore Quay, which has a maximum speed of 18 knots.  The lifeboat is self-righting and is fitted with an integrated electronics Systems and Information Management System, which allows the lifeboat crew to monitor, operate and control many of the boats systems from shock mitigating seats.

callout_18102010

Photo: courtesy of Kilmore Quay RNLI

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
The RNLB Killarney arrived yesterday into Kilmore Quay after making her delivery voyage from England. The new €3 million craft is the first Tamar-class to operate in Irish waters and is the most technically advanced lifeboat in the RNLI fleet.

The lifeboat was funded by a legacy from Mrs Mary Weeks from Surrey in England who passed away in 2006. Mrs Weeks met her husband while on a cruise off the west coast of Scotland on a boat named Killarney.

Tamar_arrival

The RNLB Killarney on her maiden arrival yesterday to Kilmore Quay, Co. Wexford.

She also has a strong RNLI connection through her maiden name Distin. Mrs Weeks was related to the Coxswain of Salcombe lifeboat Samuel Distin and to Albert Distin. Both men lost their lives in the Salcombe lifeboat disaster of 1916.

The lifeboat hull was moulded by the RNLI and fitted out in Plymouth under RNLI supervision. Lifeboat crewmembers based in Kilmore Quay have undertaken comprehensive training at the lifeboat college in Poole and onboard the Tamar class lifeboat in preparation for their new arrival.

The new lifeboat is not expected to go on service until later in the month and the next few weeks will be spent training the rest of the lifeboat crew on the new boat. RNLI Deputy Divisional Inspector Gareth Morrison said, " This is a huge day for the RNLI in Ireland. The arrival of any lifeboat is a great celebration for a community but when it is the first of a new class of lifeboat the excitement is even greater.

The Kilmore Quay lifeboat crew have been looking forward to this day for a long time. Their last lifeboat the Famous Grouse rescued over 300 people since 2004 and this lifeboat station has had many challenging rescues in its history. I wish them the very best of luck with their new lifeboat, may she have many successful years ahead of her." Kilmore Quay lifeboat Coxswain Eugene Kehoe added, "It's a proud day for Kilmore Quay.

Passage_crew

The crew of the RNLB Killarney

A new lifeboat is a tremendous gift and we will take very good care of it. We are very grateful to the donor who by leaving this legacy to the RNLI has provided a lifeboat that will go on to save many lives at sea.

On a bad night miles out to sea it is good to know that we have a state of the art lifeboat and a highly trained lifeboat crew to respond to every situation." The new Tamar class lifeboat is 16.3 metres in length with a maximum speed of 25 knots compared to the 14.3 metres of the current Tyne class lifeboat stationed at Kilmore Quay, which has a maximum speed of 18 knots.

The lifeboat is self-righting and is fitted with an integrated electronics Systems and Information Management System, which allows the lifeboat crew to monitor, operate and control many of the boats systems from shock mitigating seats. The Tamar also carries a Y boat (an inflatable daughter boat) which is housed under the aft deck and deployed from a hinged door in the transom. The lifeboat has room for 44 survivors. It will replace the current Kilmore Quay Tyne class lifeboat The Famous Grouse, which will be retired to the RNLI relief lifeboat fleet.

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Published in RNLI Lifeboats

The RNLI's new Tamar class all weather lifeboat will arrive at Kilmore Quay in County Wexford next Wednesday (13 October 2010) at 5pm. This €3 million lifeboat will be the first of its class to be based at an Irish lifeboat station. It is the most modern and technically advanced lifeboat in the RNLI fleet.

The new lifeboat, which is to be named Killarney, will undertake a five day passage from Poole in England, calling at lifeboat stations at the Channel Islands, Fowey, Padstow and Fishguard before arriving it its new home at the RNLI Kilmore Quay lifeboat station next Wednesday.

The lifeboat hull was moulded by the RNLI and fitted out in Plymouth under RNLI supervision. Lifeboat crewmembers based in Kilmore Quay have undertaken comprehensive training at the lifeboat college in Poole and on passage onboard the Tamar class lifeboat in preparation for their new arrival.

The new Tamar class lifeboat is 16.3 metres in length with a maximum speed of 25 knots compared to the 14.3 metres of the current Tyne class lifeboat stationed at Kilmore Quay, which has a maximum speed of 18 knots. The lifeboat is self-righting and is fitted with an integrated electronics Systems and Information Management System, which allows the lifeboat crew to monitor, operate and control many of the boats systems from shock mitigating seats.

The Tamar also carries a Y boat (an inflatable daughter boat) which is housed under the aft deck and deployed from a hinged door in the transom. The lifeboat has room for 44 survivors. It will replace the current Kilmore Quay Tyne class lifeboat The Famous Grouse, which will be retired to the RNLI relief lifeboat fleet. The €3 million lifeboat has been funded from a legacy.

All are welcome to attend. The RNLI is inviting everyone interested to see the new lifeboat's arrival into Kilmore Quay Harbour to be in place before 5pm.

Tamar Arrival in Ireland

Event: First Tamar class lifeboat in Ireland to arrive at Kilmore Quay RNLI Lifeboat Station in County Wexford

Date: Wednesday 13 October 2010

Time: 5pm at Kilmore Quay harbour in County Wexford

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Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Next month sees the introduction of the first RNLI Tamar-class lifeboat to enter service at an Irish lifeboat station, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Costing €3m, the RNLB Killarney is to be stationed in Kilmore Quay. The new vessel is expected to make her delivery voyage on 13 October. She is to replace the existing Tyne-class lifeboat, RNLB The Famous Grouse at the Co. Wexford station which was established in 1847.

The Tamar-class is the latest high-tech craft within the RNLI lifeboat fleet in use throughout the UK. Around 17 craft of the class, named after
the River Tamar, Cornwall have entered service. Some of the class are constructed exclusively for the purposes of providing relief duties across
the extensive network of 235 lifeboat stations throughout the UK and Ireland.

One of these relief lifeboats, RNLB Frank and Ann Wilkinson (16-06) arrived in Dun Laoghaire in July from Poole, Dorset, the headquarters of the RNLI. The lifeboat carried out crew training exercises, not just for the local lifeboat crew but other station crews as part of the Irish divisional staff training programme.

The fleet is divided into two categories: inshore and all-weather class lifeboats (ALB). Of the ALB's there are currently five classes: Tyne, Mersey, Trent, Severn and Tamar. These boats can be operated safely in all weathers and are designed to self-right in the event of a capsize.

The lifeboats are fitted with navigation, location and communication equipment with the RNLI policy of operating each craft for around 25 years. The introduction of the RNLB Killarney at Kilmore Quay will enhance the organisation's vital services off the south-east coast.

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Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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