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Displaying items by tag: Carrybridge

Carrybridge RNLI’s inshore lifeboat Douglas Euan & Kay Richards was launched on Sunday evening (28 August) at the request of Belfast Coastguard to assess a vessel with two people and a small dog on board, which had run aground on Upper Lough Erne in Northern Ireland.

The volunteer crew launched at 9.40pm headed for the reported location around a mile south of Belle Isle Estate and quickly located the casualty vessel, which had been refloated and taken under tow by a smaller RIB.

As the lifeboat approached both vessels, the tow was stopped to allow the helm and crew to come alongside the casualty vessel. They assessed the situation and the wellbeing of the two people and small dog on board and found they were all OK.

A full check of the casualty vessel was carried out to make sure that there was no water ingress after the earlier grounding, and none was found.

Due to the darkness of the hour, the helm deemed the safest option would be for the lifeboat and its crew to take over the tow, and to bring the vessel back to its private marina some two miles from where it was currently positioned.

The tow was successfully transferred and the lifeboat proceeded in towing the vessel to its private marina. The crew of the RIB were thanked for their assistance and they returned to their own private mooring.

Speaking following the callout, Chris Cathcart, volunteer helm at Carrybridge RNLI advised all boat users: “Before setting out on your journey, please plan your route using the relevant charts and carry out regular checks of your position whilst you proceed.

“Also allow extra time for your journey, due to the evenings getting darker earlier as autumn approaches.

“Have a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble and have lifejackets for all on board. If you see someone or something in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Carrybridge RNLI received an unusual request this past Wednesday afternoon (24 August) to assist a cow stranded in the waters of the Erne south of Enniskillen.

The animal was reported by a member of the public to be in the water distressed unable to get out in the area of Tamlaght Bay, between Upper and Lower Lough Erne in Northern Ireland.

Once on scene, the lifeboat crew located the cow which was close to the shoreline but seemed stuck and unable to make it ashore.

Moving closer with care so as not to spook the animal, the crew found that the cow was stick deep in mud with most of her body submerged in the water.

The local PSNI, who were also on Lough Erne that afternoon, arrived on scene to offer their assistance. Both the volunteer lifeboat crew and the PSNI attempted numerous times to assist the cow back to the shoreline but to no avail.

Due to the animal becoming very tired and weak, and starting to shiver, the Northern Ireland Fire and Rescue Service (NIFRS) were also requested to attend to offer further help using some of its specialist equipment.

Enquires to locate the owner were made, during which time the lifeboat crew spotted a local farmer feeding animals in another field and made approached him. This farmer was able to alert the cow’s owner.

The NIFRS arrived on scene at the same time as the owner of the cow. The farmer checked the wellbeing of the animal and then set up a halter to assist in the abstraction of the cow from the mud to the shoreline.

The cow was then successfully brought ashore, and after a couple of shaky attempts stood up and proceeded to feed on the grass.

Her owner noted that the cow seemed to be in good health after her ordeal, and with some rest should be back to normal again. He also passed on his thanks to all involved in the rescue.

Speaking following the callout, Stephen Scott, lifeboat operations manager at Carrybridge RNLI said: “I would like to thank the member of the public who raised the alarm, as no one likes to see animals of any kind in danger.

“The swift response by the multi agencies today meant that this callout had a successful outcome for both the cow and the farmer.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Carrybridge RNLI’s inshore lifeboat Douglas Euan & Kay Richards was launched at the request of Belfast Coastguard shortly after 6.33pm on Friday evening (12 August) to a vessel which had got into difficulties in shallow water close to Naan Island.

It proved to be the start of a busy evening for the Lough Erne lifeboat volunteers in Northern Ireland who assisted 11 people in total across four boats.

Once on scene, the volunteer crew located two vessels in close proximity, both of which had got into difficulties in shallow water.

The first vessel, with one person onboard, was assessed and the decision made with the owner’s permission to safely tow it into deeper water.

With the first vessel in safe water, attention turned to the second boat, with five people and a dog on board, which was further aground.

The crew transferred four people from this vessel to the first vessel as they were travelling together. A safe route was established for the lifeboat crew to tow the casualty into deeper water with the owner’s permission. Both vessels then proceeded on their onward journey.

Meanwhile, a third vessel was spotted by the lifeboat crew entering the same very shallow area of water. The lifeboat approached this vessel, which had two people onboard, and then after speaking with the owner was safely escorted back to deeper water where they were able to continue their journey.

As the lifeboat crew were making their way back to the station, they observed a fourth vessel with four people onboard which had encountered engine difficulties after getting caught in weeds around one mile North West of Knockninny. The lifeboat crew, with the owner’s permission, set up a tow and brought the vessel back to its private berth.

Speaking later, Stephen Scott, lifeboat operations manager at Carrybridge RNLI said: “Now we are in the summer season we would urge all boat owners to make sure you have the relevant charts required before starting your journey, lifejackets for all on board and a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble.

“If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is: 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

The RNLI in Carrybridge and Enniskillen on Lough Erne received a donation of £1500 from Wild Blue Green Yonder following a charity swim around Castle Island in Enniskillen.

The swim was held in September as part of the Festival Lough Erne events and had approximately 30 people in attendance to take part in the 750 metre swim around the island. The group had previously attended an open water swimming course organised by the Policing and Community Safety Partnership (PCSP).

The cheque was presented to Peter Scott from the Lough Erne Fundraising Branch for the Carrybridge and Enniskillen RNLI stations. Peter is also Water Safety Officer for both stations and part of that role is to provide education training around water safety.

Stephen Scott, Lifeboat Operations Manager, at Carrybridge RNLI praised all those who took part in the swim for all their hard work and dedication raising money for both lifeboat stations on Lough Erne. “The funds raised are vital to the continuing work of the RNLI on Lough Erne, both at our Carrybridge and Enniskillen stations, and will assist with future life saving operations. We are delighted to have strong links to the community here in Fermanagh and would wish to record our thanks to Wild Blue Yonder for the donation we have received.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

A volunteer crew member from Carrybridge Lifeboat Station successfully completed the rigorous RNLI helm assessment this past Wednesday 9 March.

Twenty-nine-year-old Kyle Boyd works for Openreach and has spent a lifetime on Upper and Lower Lough Erne in Co Fermanagh, Northern Ireland.

Kyle started his RNLI voluntary service at Carrybridge on 8 October 2015, commencing his trainee crew member training, which he completed successfully.

He then continued his journey towards the successful helm qualification which he obtained after various assessments, with his final assessment being completed yesterday by trainer assessor Stephen McNulty.

Kyle is now qualified and able to take command of the station’s Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat, Douglas Euan and Kay Richards.

Following his final assessment, when responding to a callout Kyle will be responsible for taking charge of the lifeboat when on the inland waterways of Lough Erne.

The RNLI describes the duty of a helmsman as being “to use utmost endeavours to safeguard and rescue the lives of those in danger, whilst having regard for the safety of their crew”.

Following the trainer assessor’s visit, helm Kyle Boyd said: “It feels amazing to pass out and take the next step in my lifeboat volunteer career. I’m really looking forward to taking the helm on training and shouts alike.”

Stephen Scott, lifeboat operations manager at Carrybridge RNLI, added: “I am very pleased that after all Kyle’s hard work and commitment to training, involving many long cold nights afloat on Upper Lough Erne, Kyle has achieved the status of RNLI helm for our Atlantic inshore lifeboat.

“He will be a great asset to the existing helms and will further enhance our ability to respond to the call to save lives on the inland waterways of Lough Erne.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

The volunteer lifeboat crews of Carrybridge and Enniskillen RNLI were recently delighted to receive a donation of £1,600 raised at a special event that crossed swimming with mindfulness.

‘Wild and Free at the Sea’ was held by Dips N Hips in Rossnowlagh, Co Donegal last September, welcoming 50 people for a day of open water swimming, yoga and mindfulness on the beach.

It also marked the beginning of a ‘dip a day’ challenge for the month of October, where organiser Coná Gallagher braved the waters of Lough Erne every single day.

On behalf of Dips N Hips, Coná handed over a cheque to Ivan Kee from the Lough Erne Fundraising Branch for the Carrybridge and Enniskillen RNLI stations.

Stephen Scott, lifeboat operations manager at Carrybridge RNLI, praised all those who took part in the challenge and in particular Coná for all their hard work and dedication raising money for both lifeboat stations on Lough Erne.

“The funds raised will have a significant impact for the crews at both Carrybridge and Enniskillen and will assist with future lifesaving operations,” he said.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

A father and son from Bellanaleck are among eight new lifeboat crew members who will carry pagers for the first time this Christmas at Carrybridge and Enniskillen RNLI in Northern Ireland.

As the RNLI continues its Christmas Appeal, Brian and John Sammon — who are ready to swap turkey and pudding for the December waters of Lough Erne — are urging people across Co Fermanagh to help their fellow crew, and the thousands of other volunteer crews carrying pagers over the festivities, to continue their lifesaving work.

It was when 19-year-old John became eligible to become a crew member two years ago that the family duo encouraged each other to join.

Brian says: “I had thought about joining the lifeboat crew at different times over the years because I was so aware of the work of the RNLI and I really wanted to give something back, but it wasn’t until John reached the eligible age at 17 and we saw a recruitment drive for new crew that we encouraged each other to get involved. We attended an open night and it just snowballed from there.”

Having received their pagers in November, Brian and John are now preparing to hear the beeping sound as the request for help comes in for the first time.

“We are excited but also nervous at the same time,” Brian says, “but we are here, and we want to help. That is why we joined; we want to support what is an invaluable service on Lough Erne.”

Among the other new crew members at Carrybridge are Simon Kidney, Matthew Nelson, Simon Carson, Paul McDaid and Cliff Walters, while Richard McFarland has joined the lifeboat crew at Enniskillen.

Richard, who lives in Lisbellaw, has always had a great love for the water but having worked away he couldn’t commit to joining the lifeboat crew until he returned home.

“This is my first Christmas on call,” Richard says, “and I know even over the festive period, our lifesavers are ready to drop everything at a moment’s notice and rush to the aid of someone in trouble on the water…We hope that this year’s Christmas appeal will show people just how tough it can be, but also that with their help we can get so much closer to our goal of saving every one.”

To make a donation to the RNLI’s Christmas Appeal, visit RNLI.org/Xmas

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Carrybridge RNLI’s inshore lifeboat Douglas Euan & Kay Richards was launched on Tuesday afternoon (26 October) to assess a fishing boat with three people on board, which had broken down around a mile northeast of Knockninny on Upper Lough Erne.

Once on scene, the lifeboat located the casualty vessel which had blown onto an exposed shoreline on an island amid Force 4-5 southwesterly gusts.

The volunteer helm and crew assessed the vessel and the wellbeing of the persons on board from a close but safe distance, and found they were all well.

It was established that the casualty vessel had suffered engine failure, and due to the strong winds had been blown onto the shoreline of the island.

After a full review of the situation, and due to the large waves landing on the island shoreline, the helm deemed the safest option was to put two volunteer crew from the lifeboat onto the other side of the island which was sheltered from the waves.

The crew then walked the three persons across the island to this safer location to get onboard the lifeboat. They were brought back to the nearest safe marina which was Knockninny public jetty.

The volunteer crew of the lifeboat then went back and refloated the fishing boat from the shoreline and brought it to the safety of Knockninny.

Speaking following the callout, Carrybridge lifeboat operations manager Stephen Scott had advice for all boat users in Northern Ireland and elsewhere.

“Before setting out on your journey, please check the weather forecast for the day ahead, have a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble and have lifejackets for all onboard,” he said.

“If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Carrybridge RNLI’s inshore lifeboat was launched yesterday afternoon (Friday 10 September) to assess a cabin cruiser with two people on board which had broken down some two miles southeast of Knockninny in Co Fermanagh.

Once on scene on Upper Lough Erne, the volunteers established that the casualty vessel had suffered fuel issues and drifted into reeds in a small bay.

After a full review of the situation, lifeboat helm Chris Cathcart deemed the safest option was to carefully tow the vessel into deeper water, and then to proceed to tow it back to the nearest safe berth which was Knockninny public jetty.

With the owner’s permission, a stern tow was established from the lifeboat to the casualty vessel, and it was taken back to Knockninny where it was safely secured at the jetty.

Speaking following the callout, Cathcart echoed his previous advice for boat users, many of whom will be making the most of the remaining weeks of the 2021 cruising season.

“Before setting out on your journey, please plan your route and carry out regular checks of their vessels prior to going afloat and also throughout your journey,” he said.

“Have a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble, have lifejackets for all on board and plan their journey using the relevant charts.

“If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Carrybridge RNLI’s inshore lifeboat and rescue water craft were launched yesterday afternoon (Saturday 28 August) to assess a vessel in distress with five people on board.

The sport cruiser had run aground some two miles upstream from Bellanaleck in the vicinity of Tamlaght Bay.

Upon arrival, the lifeboat crew assessed the vessel and those on board, and determined that the boat was slightly aground in its present position.

With the owner’s permission, the cruiser was refloated and an alongside tow was set up to bring it into deeper water.

Further checks were carried out and the vessel was found to be in perfect working order before it was allowed to continue its journey.

Speaking following the callout, Chris Cathcart of Carrybridge RNLI offered advice for boat uses this UK bank holiday weekend.

“We would ask that everyone have a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble, have lifejackets for all on board and plan their journey using the relevant charts.

“If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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