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Displaying items by tag: Dublin Port Company

Dublin Port Company today published trade statistics for 2010 which showed an increase in the port's volumes of 6.1% in 2010.

Total throughput for the year was 28.1m tonnes which is less than 10% down from the port's best ever performance in 2007 at the height of the boom. Export traffic was particularly strong with 12.6% growth in the year.

Screen_shot_2011-02-08_at_11.27.28

Growth was concentrated in the unitised modes but was partially offset by declines in bulk liquid and bulk solid cargoes due directly to the sluggish performance of the economy.

The volume of Ro-Ro freight units increased by 12.8% to 725,665 which is less than 1% down from the port's highest ever throughput. This performance confirms Dublin Port as the island's premier port for Ro-Ro. Growth in the year was driven in part by the new CLdN Ro-Ro services to Zeebrugge and Rotterdam.

Growth in Lo-Lo container volumes was 1.1% with an outturn of 554,259 TEU in 2010.

Dublin's position as the island's largest unitised port was reinforced by the commencement of rail freight services linking Dublin to Ballina. Demand for these services continues to grow and during 2011, we expect rail freight to remove up to 10,000 trucks from the road.

Further underpinning Dublin Port's popularity among RoRo shipping lines was the decision by Seatruck Ferries yesterday to announce a new freight- only service linking Dublin with Heysham which will commence Monday 14 Feb 2011.

Imports of fuel oil products (motor fuel and aviation spirit) dropped 6.5% in the year to 3.8m tonnes. Notwithstanding this decline, Dublin Port remains the country's most important port for oil imports, accounting for more than 50% of national demand.

In the bulk solid mode, there was a 7.9% decline to 1.5m tonnes in the year due to the continued decline in demand for construction materials. Trade cars imported through Dublin Port doubled to 47,249 in the year and there was also a strong performance in the ferry passenger business with numbers up 17.6% to 1.8m.

Screen_shot_2011-02-08_at_11.27.36

In addition to the ferry business, Dublin Port remained the country's largest port for cruise ship visits with 85 cruise ship calls bringing 130,000 tourists and crew to the city during the year.

Discussing Dublin Port Company's outlook for trade levels in 2011, Eamonn O'Reilly, Chief Executive of Dublin Port Company, said:

"2010 was an exceptional year for Dublin Port. Notwithstanding the poor performance of the economy, port volumes grew by 6.1% as importers and exporters sought to minimise the cost of moving goods to market. Passenger and tourism volumes were also very buoyant as the benefits and reliability of ferry travel became clear particularly during the ash-cloud crisis.

"For 2011, we are projecting continued growth, albeit at a reduced level compared to 2010."Dublin Port's success is due to its location at the centre of the largest concentration of population on the island and also to the exceptional connections to the national road and rail networks. Dublin is close to the main markets, and shipping services are available from a wide range of excellent ferry and container lines offering importers and exporters competitive and reliable routes to market. We are very conscious of the central role Dublin Port plays in facilitating merchandise trade, the value of which is in excess of 80% of Ireland's GDP, and we are committed to continuing to develop the port in line with the needs of the economy and funded from our own resources."

Dublin Port Company's Annual Report for 2010 will be published later in the year.

Published in Dublin Port

Representatives of Tanzania, the Maldives, Ghana, Indonesia and Malaysia have benefited from the experience of Ireland's largest and most successful port management company.

Dublin Port Company today announced it has completed a training programme for five developing countries as part of its UN-appointed role under UNCTAD's TrainForTrade programme.

Efficient maritime transport and port services are essential for creating sustainable economies in the developing world. The TrainforTrade programme helps ports in developing countries build better local economies by attracting and generating greater trade volumes using improved commercial handling practices learned from their training partner. In 2007, Dublin Port Company was chosen as the United Nation's partner to deliver training to ports in English-speaking countries in the developing world.

Representatives from the ports of Tanzania, the Maldives, Ghana, Indonesia and Malaysia, who have successfully completed their Train for Trade programme were today presented with their certificates by the Minister of State for Overseas Development, Mr. Peter Power TD, at a ceremony in Dáil Éireann.

Speaking at the presentation of certificates to course participants, Minister of State for Overseas Development, Mr. Peter Power, TD, said: “I congratulate Dublin Port Company on successful completion of UNCTAD’s TrainforTrade programme. Five ports in developing countries have benefited significantly from the skills and knowledge from Ireland’s largest and most successful port management company. This programme is important for improving trade in the developing world and driving economic growth.”  

Responding to the Minister, Mr. Eamonn O'Reilly, Chief Executive, Dublin Port Company, said: "Dublin Port is proud to have been able to contribute to the UN's English-speaking pilot port training programme.  We became involved in this initiative as part of our wider CSR programme and we hope that we have made a positive contribution and left a lasting legacy to help developing countries build stronger, more efficient ports for the future."

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Located in the heart of Dublin City, at the hub of the national road and rail network Dublin Port is a key strategic access point for Ireland and in particular the Dublin area. Dublin Port handles over two-thirds of containerised trade to and from Ireland and 50% of all Ireland's imports and exports, making it a significant facilitator of Ireland's economy. Dublin Port also handles over 1.5 million tourists through the ferry companies operating at the port and through cruise vessels calling to the port.

Published in Ports & Shipping
The jack up barge Aran 250 has been positioned in Dublin bay to carry out Borehole Drilling. The work is part of a Dublin City Council (DCC) project relating to the Ringsend Wastewater Treatment Plant. It will involve the use of either the jack-up barge "Aran 250" or "Excalibur".

These jack-up barges will be used for the drilling of test boreholes at various locations within Dublin Bay and its approaches. Initially, the "Aran 250" will be used and it is expected that under normal conditions it will operate on a 24 hour / 7 day week basis.

At all times when the jack-up barge is on location it will transmit an "AIS" signal. By night the barge will display white lights (operated in unison) flashing Morse code (U) every 15 seconds. These will be located at each corner. The barge itself will be lit by operational deck lights.

When the jack-up barge is operational it will have the standby boat "James Joyce" with two people on board in attendance. They will tie-up to a buoy moored approximately 300 metres away from the barge. The small tug "Trojan" will operate as a supply boat and will be based at the Poolbeg Marina. The Trojan will also be used for towing the barge from one location to the next.

The test borehole drilling positions (WGS 84) are as follows :-

M06 Lat 53˚ 19' 53.46'' N Long 006˚ 09' 39.08'' W M15 Lat 53˚ 19' 11.35'' N Long 006˚ 06' 58.16'' W

M07 Lat 53˚ 19' 11.27'' N Long 006˚ 08' 21.42'' W M16 Lat 53˚ 18' 32.75'' N Long 006˚ 06' 33.07'' W

M08 Lat 53˚ 19' 50.64'' N Long 006˚ 06' 21.73'' W M17 Lat 53˚ 20' 23.37'' N Long 006˚ 05' 16.93'' W

M09 Lat 53˚ 18' 38.17'' N Long 006˚ 05' 45.02'' W M18 Lat 53˚ 19' 32.50'' N Long 006˚ 05' 19.69'' W

M10 Lat 53˚ 17' 44.38'' N Long 006˚ 03' 41.33'' W M19 Lat 53˚ 18' 16.91'' N Long 006˚ 05' 02.71'' W

M11 Lat 53˚ 19' 42.31'' N Long 006˚ 03' 22.31'' W M20 Lat 53˚ 17' 51.94'' N Long 006˚ 04' 43.04'' W

M12 Lat 53˚ 19' 00.03'' N Long 006˚ 00' 25.74'' W M21 Lat 53˚ 18' 56.68'' N Long 006˚ 04' 07.12'' W

M13 Lat 53˚ 19' 51.50'' N Long 006˚ 10' 13.42'' W M22 Lat 53˚ 19' 09.75'' N Long 006˚ 02' 37.54'' W

M14 Lat 53˚ 19' 59.29'' N Long 006˚ 07' 53.39'' W M23 Lat 53˚ 18' 48.98'' N Long 005˚ 59' 07.97'' W

Each location will take approximately 1 week to drill. Drilling will not follow in sequence listed above. VTS will keep all shipping advised with regards to the location at which the barge is operating.

More detail is contained in a marine notice issued by Dublin Port Company's
Harbour Master, Captain David T. Dignam HERE

Published in Dublin Bay
The "Train-For-Trade" programme, which involved training 22 port officials from six organisation's has ended after a year-long programme on skills to improve work efficiency and modern port management skills. 

The training programme, also sought to foster economic development and was facilitated by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) , Dublin Port Company experts and local experts from the Ghana Ports and Harbours Authority (GPHA).

Mr. Nestor Galley, the Director-General of GPHA, thanked UNCTAD, Irish Aid and Dublin Port Company for extending the training programme to Ghana and called on all companies at the port to get involved in the project. In addition to ensuring their staff is updated on best practices in port management.

Participants were awarded certificates and were drawn from customs, excise and preventive service (CEPS), MOL Ghana, Ghana Shippers Authority, Ghana Maritime University, Ghana Ports and Harbours Authority (GPHA) and Advanced Stevedoring Company. Other countires involved in the programme include Tanzania, Indonesia, Malaysia and Maldives.

Published in Ports & Shipping
A former lightship which has remained docked in Dublin Port for several years, could be used as a tourist attraction, according to a report in The Sunday Times.

The Dublin 'Docklands' developer, Harry Crosbie is seeking permission from Dublin City Council to raise the 500-ton lightship, Kittiwake and place on the quayside opposite The 02 Theatre. Currently the lightship is berthed nearby the East-Link road toll bridge and acts as a notable floating feature to countless daily commuters.

In 2007, the Commissioners of Irish Lights (CIL) sold the 1959 built lightship to Crosbie. The 134-foot lightship had served in that role for many years around the Irish coast. In 1981, as part of an extensive modernisation programme, the Kittiwake and other lightships were converted into an automated light-float (ALF). The last station served by the ALF was at South Rock, Co. Down.

If the former lightship is given the green light, the vessel would act as a "welcoming point" for cruise tourists. Subject to planning permission, the lightship would undergo another re-conversion project to create an open-plan café bar for a period of five years.

The veteran vessel would also have its lighthouse light restored and would "beam" across the docklands and entertainment venue. The lightship would maintain its customary 'red' hull with Kittiwake written in neon on the side.

In order to attract this cruise business to the Kittiwake, Crosbie has asked the Dublin Port Company to relocate the main existing cruise-ship location closer to the O2 Theatre. The proposal has the support of Dublin City Council.

In the meantime the majority of cruise-ships dock at Alexandra Basin, in the heart of the port's industrial zone but the distance is quite far from there to the city centre.

On an annual the capital welcomes around 80,000 passengers during each season, generally between May to October. In 2011, the port expects 86 cruise-calls, potentially generating €35m to €55m to the economy.

The proposed for the new terminal is to be submitted to the EU this month, in the hope of financing support. Meanwhile the proposed site envisaged for the cruise terminal, is occupied by tugs based operated by Dublin Port Company.

Published in Dublin Bay

According to a report in the Irish Times this morning Dublin Port Company is considering a proposal by docklands entrepreneur Harry Crosbie to relocate the city's cruise ship terminal to a site closer to the heart of the city beside the East Link bridge. 86 Cruise liners arrived in Dublin Port this Summer.

Cruise liner traffic into Dublin is in line with last years figures when almost 80 cruise liners visited the port in 2009, carrying 120,000 passengers and crew to Dublin.
The largest arrival the blue hulled Marco Polo at 176 metre contribute significantly to the Dublin economy. 

Published in Cruise Liners

Ireland's largest port will open up to the public next Saturday (18 September) when the Dublin Port Company is to host a free family-friendly Open Day.

The fun free events will be taking place throughout the day at Dublin Port, from 10am – 4pm. A festival atmosphere will greet Dubliners as visitors of all ages enjoy balloon makers, video installations, face-painters and interactive games.

Free coach tours will be operating around the port all day, offering visitors a glimpse of how Ireland's largest and busiest Port operates.

In addition for the first time there will also be free tours of the port area by sea throughout the day for adults and children (height restriction of 3'9" or 114cm applies) which will offer all our visitors the opportunity to see the port from the perspective of Captains of ferries and ocean liners as they arrive at Dublin Port.

Speaking at the launch of the Dublin Port Open Day, Mr. Eamonn O'Reilly, Chief Executive, Dublin Port Company, said: "The Open Day is a fantastic opportunity for us to engage with the local community and encourage them to come and experience the workings of Ireland's largest port at first hand. Visitors to our Open Day are always amazed to witness the scale and diversity of the work undertaken at the port on a daily basis.

When Dublin Port hosted an Open Day two years ago over 2,000 came for the free fun-filled day but also discovered just how relevant it is to their daily lives. We look forward to welcoming many more visitors again this year."

For further information on the port www.dublinport.ie

Published in Dublin Port

The ports of Dublin and Cork are scheduled to receive a record 139 cruiseships in total this year, bringing 180,000 visitors and crew. Many more of these cruiseships are due to visit over the next two months and stretching into late Autumn. Between €35-55m is expected to be generated into the Dublin region from high-spend cruise visitors
while a further €5m is predicted for the local economy at Cork, writes Jehan Ashmore.

A notable visitor due to grace Dublin Bay is the return of The World, albeit not strictly a cruiseship but the first custom-built time-share ship. The vessel is to dock in the capital for four-nights from 4-8 August and then sails overnight to Cobh, for two-nights from 9-11 August.

In essence, The World presents an exclusively unique lifestyle experience. Instead of passengers, there are 'residents' who live onboard. Residents of the 43,188 gross tonnes (GT) vessel don't merely occupy a cabin but own large-sized luxurously appointed private apartments that are 'home' complete with balconies.

On 9 August, Silver Cloud docks at Dublin from Oban, Scotland. Measuring 16,927 GT, the vessel may not be the largest with only 315 passengers, but is an ultra-luxury cruiseship, regarded as one of the highest standards in the cruise-sector industry.

Returning to Cork Harbour, Cobh awaits the mighty Independence of the Seas. At 154,407 tonnes, she is the biggest ever cruiseship to dock at any Irish port. With a massive 4,375 passenger capacity, attractions include rock-climbing or surfing-boarding  using a special pool. The 'Independence' berths mid-afternoon on 29 August for an overnight call, departing 18.00hrs the next day.

Among smaller cruiseships, the private-motoryacht like, Island Sky of 4,000 tonnes and with 200 passengers, calls to Dublin on 11 August, and may berth upriver close to the new Samual Beckett Bridge.

Those keen on traditional ships, can look forward to the visit of Classic International Cruises Princess Danae, built in 1955. The veteran is due 16 August, and her sister, Princess Daphne is expected 2 September. Unusually the 16,000 tonnes pair were converted from general cargo-ships for a career in cruising.

New cruiseship, Costa Luminosa (92,700 GT) costing US $ 548m makes a second call to Cobh on 3 September and is operated by Costa Cruises.
This is the first time the Italian company has ventured into Irish cruising waters.

Without doubt the largest Dublin caller this season will be Emerald Princess. The giant weighs some 113,000 gross tonnes and at 288m long will certainly provide a spectacle, with lights blaring over a dozen or so decks, during a dusk departure on 14 September.

Also entering service this year, P&O Cruises 116,000 tonnes new Azura, is set to visit Dublin on 23 September and Cork the next day. The Italian built newbuild cost US $ 535m and has a capacity for 3,076 passengers.

Ocean_Countess_departing_Dublin._Photo__Jehan_Ashmore_-_ShipSNAPS

Ocean Countess departing Dublin. Photo: Jehan Ashmore/ShipSNAPS

A newcomer to Irish ports is Cruise & Maritime Voyages Ocean Countess which is making round Ireland itineraries with calls at Cobh on 13 August and 12 September. Incidently the 'Countess' was converted into a troopship for the Falkland Islands conflict in 1982.

Jewel of the Seas (90,090 GT) makes a Cobh call on 7 September and exactly a month later returns, marking the last cruise-call to Cork in 2010 while Fred Olsen's Boudicca will be Dublin's last caller on 20 November.

For further information on other visiting cruiseships, please click links:

www.dublinport.ie/not-in-menu/cruise-ship-scheduled/

www.portofcork.ie/index.cfm/page/cruiseschedule2010

Published in Ports & Shipping
28th September 2009

Irish Ports

This is a list of seaports around the coast of the island of Ireland.

EAST COAST

Arklow – Port of Arklow

BelfastPort of Belfast (Northern Ireland)

DroghedaDrogheda Port

DublinDublin Port Company

DundalkDundalk Port Company

Dun LaoghaireDun Laoghaire Harbour Company

Greenore – Port of Greenore

HowthHowth Harbour

LarnePort of Larne (Northern Ireland)

RosslareRosslare Europort

WarrenpointWarrenpoint Harbour Authority (Northern Ireland)

Wicklow

NORTH COAST

Coleraine (Northern Ireland)

LondonderryLondonderry Port and Harbour (Northern Ireland)

WEST COAST

Ballina – Port of Ballina

Bantry Bay

Dingle

Fenit

Foynes

Galway

Killybegs

Kilronan

Limerick

Sligo 

SOUTH COAST

Castletownbere

Cobh

Cork

Dungarvan

Dunmore East

Kinsale

New Ross

Port of Waterford

Ringaskiddy

Tivoli

Youghal

Published in Irish Ports
Page 8 of 8

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