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Displaying items by tag: Geophysical

The first in a series of hydrographic and geophysical surveys to be undertaken in the Celtic Sea and Atlantic Ocean under the INFOMAR programme between April and October 2019 is now under way.

The RV Celtic Voyager (callsign EIQN) set off on Friday 12 April for an 18-day survey, the first of four over the next five months 18 May-6 June, 12-28 July, 29 August-14 September).

The RV Celtic Explorer (callsign EIGB) will follow up with an 18-day survey from 21 September to 8 October. Both vessels will be towing a magnetometer sensor with a single cable of up to 200 metres in length.

Other survey vessel involved include the Geological Survey Ireland vessels RV Keary (callsign EI-GO-9), RV Geo (callsign EI-DK-6), RV Mallet (callsign EI-SN-9) and RV Lir (callsign EI-HI-2).

All will display appropriate lights and markers and will be listening on VHF Channel 16 throughout the course of the surveys.

Full details of the survey areas are included in Marine Notice No 8 of 2019, a PDF of which is available to read or download HERE.

Published in Marine Science

The Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport has been advised that Orbis Energy Ltd on behalf of Providence Resources PLC will commence a Geophysical survey which will be undertaken approximately 220 kilometres off the South West Coast of Ireland, involving multi-beam echosounder, dual frequency sidescan sonar and sub bottom profiler assisted by the use of an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) operated in close proximity to the vessel. The survey will also include shallow geotechnical sampling and an Environmental Baseline Survey.

The survey is anticipated to commence on Sunday 19th February 2017 and the estimated duration is 6 days, weather permitting. The latest completion date for the survey will be the 19th March 2017.

The Fugro Searcher (call sign: 3EUY6) is scheduled to carry out the work. The vessel will be listening on VHF Channel 16 at all times.  

Survey Area

Ref

Latitude

Longitude

1

50°47’53.707”N

12°59’09.114”W

2

50°47’21.570”N

12°57’15.670”W

3

50°46’13.075”N

12°58’08.342”W

4

50°46’31.708”N

12°59’22.783”W

5

50°46’43.146”N

12°59’53.952”W

6

50°47’07.564”N

12°59’44.993”W

Greater Work Area

Ref

Latitude

Longitude

1

50°49’17.471”N

12°59’58.095”W

2

50°47’55.122”N

12°55’05.392”W

3

50°44’50.814”N

12°57’13.742”W

4

50°46’12.099”N

13°02’06.913”W

 

All vessels, particularly those engaged in fishing, are requested to give the survey site a wide berth and to keep a sharp lookout in the relevant areas.

The Survey Vessel will be displaying visual indicators on the mast during daylight and lights during the night to advise other mariners of their restricted manoeuvrability.

All mariners are reminded of their responsibilities under the International Collision Regulations and are reminded of Marine Notice No. 17 of 2007, which gives general advice in relation to the activities of vessels engaged in survey work for hydrographic, seismic, fishing research and underwater operations.

The International Regulations for Prevention of Collisions at Sea (COLREGS) are implemented in Irish law by the Merchant Shipping (Collision Regulations) (Ships and Water Craft on the Water) Order 2012 [S.I. No. 507 of 2012], and the Signals of Distress (Ships) Rules 2012 [S.I. No.170 of 2012].  See Marine Notice No. 06 of 2013.  These Statutory Instruments may be purchased by mail order from Government Publications, Office of Public Works, 52 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2.  Tel: (01) 6476834/1890-213434.  They are also available online at: www.irishstatutebook.ie.

Marine Notices are issued purely for maritime safety and navigation reasons and should not be construed as conferring rights or granting permissions.

Published in Marine Warning
Tagged under

Marine Science Perhaps it is the work of the Irish research vessel RV Celtic Explorer out in the Atlantic Ocean that best highlights the essential nature of marine research, development and sustainable management, through which Ireland is developing a strong and well-deserved reputation as an emerging centre of excellence. From Wavebob Ocean energy technology to aquaculture to weather buoys and oil exploration these pages document the work of Irish marine science and how Irish scientists have secured prominent roles in many European and international marine science bodies.

 

At A Glance – Ocean Facts

  • 71% of the earth’s surface is covered by the ocean
  • The ocean is responsible for the water cycle, which affects our weather
  • The ocean absorbs 30% of the carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by human activity
  • The real map of Ireland has a seabed territory ten times the size of its land area
  • The ocean is the support system of our planet.
  • Over half of the oxygen we breathe was produced in the ocean
  • The global market for seaweed is valued at approximately €5.4 billion
  • · Coral reefs are among the oldest ecosystems in the world — at 230 million years
  • 1.9 million people live within 5km of the coast in Ireland
  • Ocean waters hold nearly 20 million tons of gold. If we could mine all of the gold from the ocean, we would have enough to give every person on earth 9lbs of the precious metal!
  • Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector in the world – Ireland is ranked 7th largest aquaculture producer in the EU
  • The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest ocean in the world, covering 20% of the earth’s surface. Out of all the oceans, the Atlantic Ocean is the saltiest
  • The Pacific Ocean is the largest ocean in the world. It’s bigger than all the continents put together
  • Ireland is surrounded by some of the most productive fishing grounds in Europe, with Irish commercial fish landings worth around €200 million annually
  • 97% of the earth’s water is in the ocean
  • The ocean provides the greatest amount of the world’s protein consumed by humans
  • Plastic affects 700 species in the oceans from plankton to whales.
  • Only 10% of the oceans have been explored.
  • 8 million tonnes of plastic enter the ocean each year, equal to dumping a garbage truck of plastic into the ocean every minute.
  • 12 humans have walked on the moon but only 3 humans have been to the deepest part of the ocean.

(Ref: Marine Institute)

At A Glance – Figaro Race

  • It starts in June or July from a French port.
  • The race is split into four stages varying from year to year, from the length of the French coast and making up a total of around 1,500 to 2,000 nautical miles (1,700 to 2,300 mi; 2,800 to 3,700 km) on average.
  • Over the years the race has lasted between 10 and 13 days at sea.
  • The competitor is alone in the boat, participation is mixed.
  • Since 1990, all boats are of one design.

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