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Latest Environment Stories
Irish Weather Buoy Network Features On RTE’s ‘Weather Live’ Tonight
Weather
#Weather - The work of the Marine Institute's Irish Weather Buoy Network will feature on RTE One's Weather Live this evening (Friday 17 November). The TV programme has filmed the redeployment of the M5 weather buoy, which broke free during…
Construction of an embarkation pontoon is underway in Youghal, County Cork
Irish Marinas
An 'Embarkation Pontoon' at Youghal Co. Cork is underway allowing boating visitors to get on and off their boats without having to resort to dinghies. According to the local 'Build a Marina in Youghal' Facebook page, pile driving will be…
Monkstown Bay is getting a slipway extension
Cork Harbour
Monkstown Bay in Cork Harbour is getting a slipway extension which will improve boat launching and recovery. The previously narrower slipway is being renewed and widened.  The slipway is at the upriver side of the Sand Quay which is primarily…
Last Chance To Apply For Post-Doc Research Roles With Marine Institute
Jobs
#Jobs - This Thursday 16 November is the closing date for two post-doctoral research roles with the Marine Institute. Based at the Marine Institute’s facility in Newport, Co Mayo, the WATexR (Climate JPI) Project requires a post-doc for a period…
Learn More About ’Science Of The Sea’ During Science Week 2017
Marine Science
#MarineScience - Science of the sea will be celebrated by the Marine Institute via a number of events taking place during Science Week from Sunday 12 to Sunday 19 November. The institute will host an interactive stand at the Mayo…
The new sight on the beach - a quad bike and trailer - showing East Cork community dedication to the preservation of a clean maritime environment
Coastal Notes
Ballynamona Strand on the East Cork coastline is internationally renowned for a long list of bird life including Shrikes, Larks, Citrine Wagtails, Sandpipers, Pipits, American Coot and Red-necked Stint. There is a new sight to be seen there, writes Tom…
The SR2000 tidal turbine during assembly at the H&W shipyard in Belfast last year
Power From the Sea
#SeaPower - A Scottish tidal energy company is launching a new round of funding to commericalise its developments in Orkney, as HydroWorld reports. Scotrenewables has appointed Aberdeen-based financial advisors Simmons & Company International to lead the investment process after successful…
New Project Launched To Revolutionise Fish Feed For Agriculture
Marine Science
#Aquaculture - The INvertebrateIT Project for the aquaculture sector, in which the Marine Institute is one of five partners, has been officially launched. The project is focused on developing innovative approaches for aquaculture, particularly on the use of organic waste…
INFOMAR Seminar Takes Place In Cork Next Week
Marine Science
#INFOMAR - This year’s annual seminar for the INFOMAR programme will take place next Wednesday 15 and Thursday 16 November at the National Maritime College of Ireland on Cork Harbour. The Integrated Mapping for the Sustainable Development of Ireland’s Marine Resource…
Mum and Dad Short Tail Nurse Sharks wait for their babies to hatch at the National Sea Life Centre Bray.  It has taken four years for the male and female to breed.  The eggs from the rare sharks, now facing a dramatic decline in the wild,  can now be seen growing in their tank at Sea Life Bray and the pups are expected to hatch towards the end of the year.
Marine Wildlife
It’s the Year of the Shark at Ireland’s Sea Life Centre where two Short Tail Nurse Sharks have bred for the first time. The eggs from the rare sharks, now facing a dramatic decline in the wild, can now be…
The fin whale carcass was discovered washed up on Arranmore over the weekend
Marine Wildlife
#MarineWildlife - Residents on Arranmore off the Donegal coast were surprised to find a rare whale carcass washed up on their island over the weekend. According to BBC News, the 20-metre cetacean is believed to be a fin whale, an…
Scattery island in the Shannon Estuary
Cruising
Clare County Council has welcomed the inclusion of County Clare into the marketing programme for the Cool Route project which aims to grow numbers of private craft, super-yachts and passenger liners visiting the coastlines of Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland, the…
Ireland’s annual winter visitors, light-bellied brent geese pictured on Bull Island
Dublin Bay
#DublinBay - Dublin City Council will be hosting an open day on North Bull Island this Saturday 11 November 2017 from 10am till 4pm to celebrate the return of the light bellied brent goose to Dublin Bay. The event, held…
Marine Notice: Monitoring Buoy Deployment In Killybegs Bay
Coastal Notes
#MarineNotice - TechWorks Marine advises that it is planning to deploy a marine monitoring buoy in Killybegs Bay that will be in place from this month till March 2018. Part of the oceanographic monitoring for the Department of Agriculture, Food…
Caitriona Lucas was posthumously awarded the State's highest honour for bravery earlier this month
Coastguard
#Coastguard - Irish Coast Guard management faced a protest march at the weekend over Kilkee’s lack of a full rescue service — and one restricted further since the death last year of coastguard volunteer Caitriona Lucas, as The Irish Times…
Lacken Pier in Co Mayo has a memorial to the lives lost in the October 1927 drowning tragedy
Coastal Notes
#ClegganBay - The Irish Times writes on Saturday’s (28 October) memorial service for lives lost in the Cleggan Bay Disaster 90 years ago. Forty-five men, many of them from Connemara, died after a sudden and severe storm hit a small fleet…

For all you need on the Marine Environment - covering the latest news and updates on marine science and wildlife, weather and climate, power from the sea and Ireland's coastal regions and communities - the place to be is Afloat.ie.

Coastal Notes

The Coastal Notes category covers a broad range of stories, events and developments that have an impact on Ireland's coastal regions and communities, whose lives and livelihoods are directly linked with the sea and Ireland's coastal waters.

Topics covered in Coastal Notes can be as varied as the rare finding of sea-life creatures, an historic shipwreck with secrets to tell, or even a trawler's net caught hauling much more than just fish.

Other angles focusing the attention of Coastal Notes are Ireland's maritime museums, which are of national importance to maintaining access and knowledge of our nautical heritage, and those who harvest the sea using small boats based in harbours where infrastructure and safety pose an issue, plying their trade along the rugged wild western seaboard.

Coastal Notes tells the stories that are arguably as varied as the environment they come from, and which shape people's interaction with the natural world and our relationship with the sea.

Marine Wildlife

One of the greatest memories of any day spent boating around the Irish coast is an encounter with Marine Wildlife. It's a thrill for young and old to witness seabirds, seals, dolphins and whales right there in their own habitat. And as boaters fortunate enough to have experienced it will testify, even spotting a distant dorsal fin can be the highlight of any day afloat. Was that a porpoise? Was it a whale? No matter how brief the glimpse, it's a privilege to share the seas with Irish marine wildlife.

Thanks to our location in the North Atlantic, there appears to be no shortage of marine life to observe. From whales to dolphins, seals, sharks and other ocean animals, the Marine Wildlife category documents the most interesting accounts around our shores. And we're keen to receive your observations, your photos, links and video clips, too!

Also valuable is the unique perspective of all those who go afloat, from coastal sailing to sea angling to inshore kayaking to offshore yacht racing, as what they encounter can be of great importance to organisations such as the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG). Thanks to their work we now know we share the seas with dozens of species who also call Ireland home. But as impressive as the list is, the experts believe there are still gaps in our knowledge. Next time you are out on the ocean waves, keep a sharp look out!

Weather

As an island in the North Atlantic, Ireland's fate is decided by Weather more so than many other European countries. When storm-force winds race across the Irish Sea, ferry and shipping services are cut off, disrupting our economy. When swollen waves crash on our shores, communities are flooded and fishermen brace for impact - both to their vessels and to their livelihoods.

Keeping abreast of the weather, therefore, is as important to leisure cruisers and fishing crews alike - for whom a small craft warning can mean the difference between life and death - as it is to the communities lining the coast, where timely weather alerts can help protect homes and lives.

Weather affects us all, and Afloat.ie will keep you informed on the hows and the whys.

Marine Science

Perhaps it's the work of the Irish research vessels RV Celtic Explorer and RV Celtic Voyager out in the Atlantic Ocean that best highlights the essential nature of Marine Science for the future growth of Ireland's emerging 'blue economy'.

From marine research to development and sustainable management, Ireland is developing a strong and well-deserved reputation as an emerging centre of excellence. Whether it's Wavebob ocean energy technology to aquaculture to weather buoys and oil exploration, the Marine Science category documents the work of Irish marine scientists and researchers and how they have secured prominent roles in many European and international marine science bodies.

Power From The Sea

The message from the experts is clear: offshore wind and wave energy is the future. And as Ireland looks towards the potential of the renewable energy sector, generating Power From The Sea will become a greater priority in the State's 'blue growth' strategy.

Developments and activities in existing and planned projects in the pipeline from the wind and wave renewables sector, and those of the energy exploration industry, point to the future of energy requirements for the whole world, not just in Ireland. And that's not to mention the supplementary industries that sea power projects can support in coastal communities.

Irish ports are already in a good position to capitalise on investments in offshore renewable energy services. And Power From The Sea can even be good for marine wildlife if done properly.

Aside from the green sector, our coastal waters also hold a wealth of oil and gas resources that numerous prospectors are hoping to exploit, even if people in coastal and island areas are as yet unsure of the potential benefits or pitfalls for their communities.

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