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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Dublin Bay Sailing and Boating News
ISORA Champion Rockabill VI competing in the 2017 Turkey Shoot Series. The 2020 Series has been postponed due to the pandemic
The 20th edition of the popular Dublin Bay Sailing Club Turkey Shoot Series due to start in November has been postponed due to the Level Five COVID-19 lockdown beginning tonight but organisers hope there may still be a chance of…
Royal St George Sunfast 3600 Yoyo competing on Dublin Bay, the race area of the 2021 VDLR Regatta
In addition to Volvo’s confirmation of Title Sponsorship of the Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta 2021 as announced previously by Afloat here, further sponsors have now also confirmed their support for the new format of the Dublin Bay regatta next July.…
Round Ireland two-handed record bid underway - Pam Lee and Cat Hunt set sail southbound this morning. Scroll down for the live race tracker.
Track Ireland's female 675 nautical mile round Ireland sailing record bid below as the Figaro3 races 675-nautical miles against the clock to establish a new Irish sailing record. The foiling Figaro 3 Magenta Project - double-handed by Greystone's Pamela Lee and…
Dublin Port - The growth of 1.2% in Q3 has been export led
Dublin Port Company has today reported its third-quarter trading figures for 2020. The latest figures show an increase in overall port tonnage of 1.2% for Q3. After nine months, volumes are down by -6.9% compared to the same period last…
Coastal patrol vessel LE Ciara (P42) alongside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour this morning
Gardaí are investigating an incident where a body was recovered offshore from Dun Laoghaire Harbour, on Dublin Bay yesterday, (Friday, 9th October).  The Naval Service's coastal patrol vessel LÉ Ciara (P42) assisted with the recovery of the body. The body of…
Busy day in Dun Laoghaire Harbour which included the Drilling /Survey ship Geoquip Saentis seen arriving at Carlisle Pier which is to remain in port for several days to load stores and equipment in preparation for work at the Arklow Bank Wind Park. In attendence of the ship with its prominent heli-pad is Dublin Port's newest pilot cutter DPC Tolka.
Dun Laoghaire Harbour is particularly busy than usual as four ships berthed in the former ferryport that has been absent for six years since the withdrawal of Stena's HSS service linking Holyhead in Wales, writes Jehan Ashmore. Stena Line was the…
Cat Hunt (left) and Pamela Lee will start record bid at the Kish lighthouse
Offshore duo Pamela Lee and Cat Hunt who have announced an October bid to set a new Female Round Ireland sailing speed record now say the record run will start from the Kish Light and not as originally indicated off…
The city of river and sea. Modern Dublin and its port looking eastward
If you were asked to name the real centre point of modern Dublin, you'd probably dodge the question by saying that it's somewhere along a line through O'Connell Bridge and Trinity College, and on up Grafton Street or Dawson Street.…
Dublin Port Company turns its landmark Port Centre building red
Dublin Port Company has turned its landmark Port Centre building and The Diving Bell on Sir John Rogerson's Quay red to support National Fire Safety Week 2020, which runs until October 12th. More than 60 of the city's iconic buildings will…
 The spirit of September 2020, as the Water Wags have their last race of the season in Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the evening of Wednesday, September 16th. Tim & Marcus Pearson's Little Tern gets to the finish line just ahead of Ian & Judith Malcolm's Barbara, with Martin & Triona Byrne's Hild making in on port to finish third
Thank you, September. You did your best to provide us with good sailing as ingenious moves were implemented to run modified pandemic-compliant events which gave proper meaning to the season, and to our sailing traditions. It was neither your fault…
Across the Bay: Irish Ferries ropax Epsilon when bound for Holyhead. Wales while also underway Dublin Bay Cruises excursion vessel St. Bridget headed for Howth Harbour. The ferry is to take over the roster of W.B.Yeats sailings from 1 October on the Dublin -Cherbourg route for the winter months as for DBC they concluded cruises yesterday on what was a shorter season due to Covid-19 restrictions.
Cruiseferry W.B. Yeats made its final layover today, which occurs every Monday in between operating two round trips weekly during the summer/high season months on Irish Ferries Dublin-Cherbourg route, writes Jehan Ashmore. The year round Ireland-France service will be taken…
GP14s are making plans for VDLR 2021 on Dublin Bay next July, three weeks before the GP14 World Championships at Skerries in North Dublin
The Irish GP14 dinghy class has been one of the first to give a thumbs up to Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta plans for next July to divide Ireland's biggest sailing event over separate weekends. As Afloat reported previously, Dun Laoghaire…
Bathers and beachgoers at Sandycove on Dublin Bay
Sea swimming’s explosion in popularity during the Covid-19 pandemic has led scientists to call for more rapid, detailed and year-round testing of bathing water quality. As The Sunday Times reports today, a campaign on risks to swimmers’ health in Dublin…
Victorine (above) which CLdN launched onto the first pure RoRo service between the Iberian Peninula (Santander, Spain) with the UK and Ireland in June has been joined by another freight-only ferry Clementine but on a new link from these ports to Leixoes in Portugal.
Freight-ferry operator CLdN and UK ports group, Peel Ports celebate the addition of a second ferry service linking the Iberian peninsula to Liverpool and Dublin Port. The new weekly service connecting Leixoes, Portugal to the UK and Irish ports, follows the…
Laser racing on Dublin Bay is part of a number of events cancelled in the capital
Some key end of summer Dublin sailing events have been cancelled with immediate effect this weekend as a result of the Government's level three restrictions announced this evening. The announcement led the country's largest yacht racing club, Dublin Bay Sailing Club,…
While her wardrobe is not yet complete, John B Kearney's 1925-built Mavis - restored by Ron Hawkins in Maine - has enough cloth available to take her first new steps under sail in September 2020
In this time of increasing uncertainty with its frustration of sailing plans, we find reassurance in soothing thoughts of well-restored or new-built classic boats. And traditional vessels in handsome and workmanlike order have the same heartening effect. We've an instinct…

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020

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