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Displaying items by tag: RNLI

A dog and his walker were rescued after they got cut off by the tide at Sandymount this afternoon (Thursday 4 February).

Dun Laoghaire RNLI’s inshore lifeboat assisted with recovering the duo from the water and bringing them to safety at Poolbeg beach.

National Ambulance Service paramedics arrived to give the owner a medical check-up.

At the same time, an Irish Coast Guard member and a paramedic gave Hugo the dog some TLC after his dramatic experience, as Hugo can’t swim.

Dun Laoghaire’s coastguard unit reminds the public if you see anyone in difficulty in or near the water, dial 112/999 immediately and ask for the coastguard.

Published in Rescue

Portrush RNLI’s volunteers rescued two surfers who got into difficulty while surfing at Co Antrim’s East Strand earlier today (Monday 1 February).

The inshore lifeboat launched before 1.30pm following a number of 999 calls to both the coastguard and the lifeboat station, and arrived on scene within four minutes amid fair weather conditions.

It emerged that the two surfers had got caught in a rip current and despite repeated attempts to get back to shore, they realised they couldn’t as they were becoming very tired. They attracted the attention of a number of onlookers who dialled 999.

Once on scene, the RNLI crew quickly recovered the two surfers into the lifeboat and returned with them to Portrush Harbour, where they were handed off to the care of the waiting coastguard team.

Beni McAllister, lifeboat operations manager at Portrush RNLI, said: “Surfing during lockdown has become extremely popular on both our beaches here in Portrush and it is a great pastime both mentally and physically.

“However, rip tides can be treacherous, and we would ask people to take care and check on conditions before entering the water.

“These two surfers did the right thing in alerting onlookers and we are relieved that people reacted very quickly and dialled 999, which allowed us to get onto scene very quickly.

“Remember if you see someone in trouble, dial 999 and ask for the coastguard.”

The crew on this callout were helm Ben Wilson and volunteers Christy Bradley and Daniel Thorne.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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The retirement of Kieran Cotter, after 45 years of distinguished service with the Baltimore RNLI Lifeboat, puts the focus on a remarkable individual who combines a busy life afloat with solid community and commercial activity ashore in playing a key role towards the building of Baltimore's prosperity and vitality.

His lifeboat service, as revealed here is probably unrivalled in its variety, and it's no exaggeration to say that he is one of Ireland's best-known lifeboatmen.

His contribution has been augmented by his keen awareness of the lifeboat's larger role in every aspect of an enthusiastic maritime community like Baltimore, and it was during his time as cox'n that the Baltimore Lifeboat sent forth a racing crew which sailed to second place overall in the Inter-services Racing for the Beaufort Cup in Cork Week at Crosshaven.

Published in Sailor of the Month

The Courtmacsherry All-Weather Trent Class RNLI Lifeboat was called out this afternoon at 4.10 pm at to go to the immediate aid of a windsurfer who got into difficulty over one kilometre from shore off Garrylucas Strand near the Old Head of Kinsale in West Cork.

The Courtmacsherry lifeboat under Coxswain Sean O'Farrell and crew of four were underway within minutes and proceeded at full speed to the area of the casualty in rough conditions at sea this afternoon. The lifeboat reached the casualty, who was being blown out to sea, within 15 minutes, and the crew immediately plucked him from the choppy seas to the safe surround of the lifeboat. Once onboard the Lifeboat and assessed by the crew, he was immediately wrapped in blankets etc and brought back at speed to the Courtmacsherry Harbour Pontoon where he was transferred to the RNLI Station House for some further observation in a warm surrounding. He was really glad to be safely ashore and appreciated some hot drinks from Station Crewman Micheal Hurley, after a difficult 45 minutes in the cold rough water. The conditions at sea this afternoon were difficult with offshore winds haven risen in the afternoon and a rough sea developing.

Thankfully a happy ending as his mother travelled by car to collect him from the Station house, with both praising the swift action of the RNLI Lifeboat in carrying out the rescue.

The Coastguard Rescue 115 Helicopter was also tasked to assist in today’s incident.

Commenting on the callout, the Courtmacsherry RNLI Voluntary Lifeboat Operations Manager Brian O'Dwyer thanked all the Lifeboat voluntary crewmembers for the quick response to the Station’s second callout in 24 hours, and carrying out the Rescue so quickly in difficult conditions. He reiterated that is so important to call the rescue services at 112 or 999 quickly once any incident like this occurs and today this resulted in a very fast response to the scene by the rescue services.

The Courtmacsherry Lifeboat Crew involved in today’s callout were Coxswain Sean O Farrell, Mechanic Tadgh McCarthy and crew Paul McCarthy, Denis Murphy and Jim O' Donnell.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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The Courtmacsherry All-Weather Trent Class RNLI Lifeboat was called out this Friday evening to assist a man who was in difficulty on board a boat in Ring Harbour near Clonakilty, West Cork. The Courtmacsherry Lifeboat under Coxswain Sean O'Farrell and crew of five proceeded to the area of the causality which was upstream past North Ring Pier on the Clonakilty estuary. The man on board the boat required immediate attention and both the Lifeboat and the Coastguard 115 Helicopter were on scene just after 5 pm.

Assisting in this evenings callout were the Coastguard ground Unit from Castlefreke, the Rapid Response Team and the Clonakilty Fire Brigade along with local personnel etc. In a difficult situation, on dangerous coastline terrain, the man was successfully airlifted from the Boat by Rescue 115 and taken to Cork University Hospital. The Lifeboat stood by as the operation was carried out in the shallow waters just off Inchydoney Island.

Commenting on the callout, the Courtmacsherry RNLI Voluntary Lifeboat Operations Manager Brian O'Dwyer thanked all the Lifeboat crew members for their professionalism throughout this multi-agency rescue. He praised the great dedication of the Crew Members and others who arrived and put the interests of the injured party as a priority in these difficult Covid times. He again reiterated that it is so important to call the rescue services at 112 or 999 quickly once any incident like this occurs

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Working for the Department of Agriculture Food and Marine, Dunmore East Fishery Harbour Centre and liaising closely with the RNLI, Inland and Coastal Marina Systems (ICMS) has designed, manufactured and installed a new berth for Dunmore East RNLI’s all-weather Trent class lifeboat.

Installed in December 2020, the new berthing facility has been built to service the RNLI as well as provide safe and secure access ashore for various users, including cruise ship passengers.

The shared 27m long x 7m wide steel tubular pontoon is a new product from ICMS, employing waterproofing and paint system technologies not previously used on its other projects. Moored on piles, it has a 32m access gangway and is surfaced with durable Glass Reinforced Plastic (GRP) decking with excellent anti-slip properties, offering all users confident footing on a stable platform.

“Weighing in at 90 tonnes, we fabricated the tubular pontoon in six pieces to make it less challenging to manoeuvre,” says Oliver Shortall, Managing Director at ICMS. “We then joined the pieces together in the dry dock at New Ross Boat Yard in Co. Wexford prior to floating the massive structure and towing it to its new home at Dunmore East.”

Cormac O Donoghue from the Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine comments: “Working closely with us to fully understand the brief and what needed to be achieved, Inland and Coastal developed a bespoke solution catering for all stakeholders.

“The RNLI now has somewhere secure for its crew to launch from, allowing them to provide a safe environment for anyone out on the water in the area, while the cruise ship passengers can easily access the bustling fishing village, increasing footfall to local businesses during the tourist season.”

To find out more about Inland and Coastal’s pontoon ranges and unique decking options visit here

Published in Irish Marinas

Dun Laoghaire Harbour's RNLI lifeboat crew came to the rescue of a dog that slipped off the Dun Laoghaire Marina Pier and onto the rocks below this morning.

The volunteer crew of three launched swiftly at 11:35am and made their way to the scene arriving in minutes.

The crew quickly assessed the situation finding Archie the dog on rocks near the water’s edge. The lifeboat crew made their way towards him and on to the rocks and helped lift him back up onto the pier above. Archie was in good health and happy to see his owners after his ordeal as our picture shows below.

Weather conditions at the time were described as calm with good visibility.

Dog rescued by Dun Laoghaire RNLI

Speaking following the call out, Liam Mullan Dun Laoghaire RNLI Lifeboat press officer said: ‘Our crew today were very happy to reunite Archie with his owners and that he wasn’t injured from his fall. Archies owners did the right thing by calling the Irish Coast Guard and asking for help. It was much safer for our crew to approach rocks on a day like today by sea when compared to the risks associated with slips and falls from a person trying to make their way down to the water’s edge to help’.

Dog rescued by Dun Laoghaire RNLI

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Last Saturday (23rd) Donaghadee's Trent class lifeboat, Saxon, with RNLI Doctor Andrew Jackson on board answered a call by HM Coastguard to attend a cargo ship at the mouth of Belfast Lough. Donaghadee lies on the north County Down coast about 23 miles from Belfast

The coastguard was contacted by the ship requesting medical assistance for a crew member on board.

In a slight to moderate swell and excellent visibility, the lifeboat was able to maintain top speed to the ship which the Captain had repositioned to allow the lifeboat to come alongside in calmer conditions and bring the ill seaman onboard the lifeboat for assessment by its Doctor.

On return to Bangor Harbour, the casualty was transferred to the care of Bangor Coastguard Rescue Team and the Northern Ireland Ambulance Service.

Crew on board for the second call out of the year were Coxswain Philip McNamara, Mechanic Shane McNamara, Navigator Mark Nelson, Crew members Michael Field, John Petrie, Nicky Butler and Iain Kaleda, all wearing appropriate PPE equipment.

The crew wished the cargo ship crewmember a speedy recovery.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Tagged under

Skerries RNLI’s volunteer crew had a busy weekend responding to calls to stranded walkers on Friday (22 January) and a missing swimmer today (Sunday 24 January).

Shortly before 4.30pm on Friday afternoon, Dublin Coast Guard tasked Skerries RNLI following a call from An Garda Síochána reporting that a number of people had been cut off by the rising tide on Barnageeragh beach.

The lifeboat was launched and proceeded to the area indicated, where the crew quickly spotted one adult and three children at the base of the cliff above the waterline.

While the casualties were uninjured, conditions underfoot in the area were very poor due to a large number of submerged rocks covered in seaweed and algae.

Following a consultation with members of the Skerries Coast Guard unit who were at the top of the cliff, it was decided that due to the falling temperatures and rapidly fading light, the safest option would be to request the assistance of the Dublin-based Irish Coast Guard helicopter Rescue 116.

A crew member stayed with the casualties to reassure them and keep them calm until the helicopter arrived and winched them aboard.

Then today, Sunday 24 January, the volunteer crew were paged shortly after 12.30pm following a call from a concerned family member when a swimmer in Skerries had not returned at the expected time.

The lifeboat launched immediately and made its way around the headland to the swimming platform known locally as The Springers.

Upon arrival it was quickly established that the swimmer had since made it safely ashore. They were well equipped for cold water swimming and required no assistance. The lifeboat was stood down and returned to the station.

Speaking about the callouts, which came a week after the town’s first of the year, Skerries RNLI’s Gerry Canning said: “Friday afternoon was a fantastic example of how well all the emergency services work together, with full-time emergency service personnel and volunteers working alongside each other seamlessly to get the best possible outcome.

“Thankfully the call for the swimmer on Sunday was a false alarm with good intent. We encourage anyone who thinks someone may be in difficulty in or near the sea to dial 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard. The earlier they make that call the better.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Youghal RNLI Volunteer lifeboat crew were paged and tasked at 5.57 am this morning by the Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) to a report of a missing person in Youghal Harbour.

Launching at 6.08 am in freezing conditions, the lifeboat crew conducted a thorough search of the harbour area and down towards Youghal bridge, assisted by the Youghal Coast Guard unit and Youghal Gardaí.

MRCC stood down the lifeboat at 7.34 am after the person was found safe and well.

Speaking after the call out Mark Nolan, Youghal RNLI Deputy Launching Authority said: ‘I would like to thank everybody involved in this morning’s call out, weather conditions were very cold and frosty’.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Page 9 of 226

Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020

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