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Displaying items by tag: flooding

#Flooding - Water levels on Lough Neagh are at a 30-year high, and business owners in the region are counting the cost of flooding on their livelihoods, as Belfast Live reports.

A number of traders are battling to stay open despite the deluge, which came after the wettest December on record.

And the rainy trend shows no sign of letting up, with showers forecast every day till early next week.

"We're still open but nobody can get in to us," said David Cochrane of Custom Covers NI, who is keeping his new Kinnego Marina unit open despite five inches of flood waters.

"It's a bit of a mess to say the least. The financial side of it has cost me a lot."

Yesterday BBC NI weatherman Barra Best posted video of the damaging flooding at the marina on the southern end of Ireland's largest lake.

Published in Inland Waterways

#Flooding - BBC NI weatherman Barra Best has posted video to Twitter showing some of the damaging flooding at Kinnego Marina – home of Lough Neagh Sailing Club – on the southern shores of Lough Neagh near Lurgan.

And local business are braced for worse to come with further heavy rains forecast for later this evening (Wednesday 6 January), persisting overnight across Leinster and Ulster according to the latest Met Éireann forecast.

Published in Weather

#Flooding - Moves to prevent flooding in the Shannon catchment may be in breach of EU habitats directives, as The Irish Times reports.

Next Tuesday (5 January) the Taoiseach is expected convene a meeting of all relevant State agencies to discuss flood measures along the River Shannon.

And according to Simon Harris, Minister of State for the OPW, some suggestions – such as dredging and flood barriers – "will breach the EU directives" as they pose a threat to fish and birdlife.

The Shannon and its catchment are home to a number of protected species from salmon to kingfishers.

But Minister Harris said flood prevention measures were a necessity when the river catchment faces "a humanitarian crisis in some areas" due to flooding that began with Storm Desmond nearly a month ago.

It's a situation that will only deteriorate over time, with Met Éireann indicating that climate models predict worsening winter floods further into this century.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Inland Waterways

#StormFrank - Storm Frank may have passed but possible strong gales are still forecast for today (Thursday 31 December), making for a very windy New Year's Eve.

A Status Yellow marine warning has been issued by weather forecasters Met Éireann as southerly winds will increase to gale force this morning on all Irish coastal waters and on the Irish Sea, veering westerly by afternoon and increasing to strong gale force at times.

Coastal counties from Donegal to Wexford are bracing for strong and gusty winds with means speeds between 50 and 65 kmh, gusting to as high as 110 kmh – the strongest of these expected in exposed areas of Connacht and Donegal.

Such high winds should be little surprise as Storm Frank brought near hurricane strength winds to Dublin Bay yesterday afternoon – though it's not yet confirmed whether the severe weather heralds the next winter storm of the season, which would be named Gertrude as per the full list revealed this week.

Met Éireann also reports that showers or longer outbreaks of rain will be widespread across the country, with thunderstorms possible, posing additional problems for areas already experiencing or at risk of flooding.

According to TheJournal.ie, the ESB advises that waters in Lough Derg could reach levels matching the destructive floods of 2009 over the next few days.

And the flood risk could continue for another three weeks as forecasts predict further heavy rains, as The Irish Times reports.

Published in Weather

#StormEva - A Status Orange gale warning is in effect for all Irish coastal waters as the fifth winter storm of the season moves in from the Atlantic today (Wednesday 23 December).

Storm Eva will see south to southwest gales or strong gales develop this afternoon on all coastal waters and on the Irish Sea, with winds reaching storm force at times on coasts from Valentia to Erris Head to Malin Head, according to Met Éireann.

The western counties of Donegal, Galway, Mayo, Sligo and Clare will be worst affected, with winds gusting upwards of 100kmh from 1pm till late tonight, and gusts as strong as 120kmh at times between 4pm and 9pm.

Winds will only be marginally less strong throughout the rest of Ireland's coastal counties.

Storm Eva comes nearly three weeks after Storm Desmond's heavy rains caused widespread flooding that is still affecting areas along the Shannon catchment from Athlone to Limerick, as RTÉ News reports.

Published in Weather
Tagged under

#Flooding - Flooding in the Shannon catchment is still "severe" according to the National Emergency Coordination Group,

As RTÉ News reports, waters have risen by 2.5cm in the Athlone area, where the Shannon breached its banks before the weekend.

And levels expected to peak on the Lower Shannon later today (Monday 14 December) between Lough Derg and Limerick, which experienced serious flooding in parts of the city not normally affected.

However, as rain persists over coming days, counties in the South and South West remain at risk, as heavy rainfalls "could cause flooding in areas have had no flooding so far".

Meanwhile, at the other end of the waterway, Lough Erne burst its banks in the Enniskillen area at the weekend – rendering a number of roads impassable, as the News Letter reports.

Published in Inland Waterways

#Flooding - Met Éireann confirms that further flooding is expected as prolonged falls of very heavy rain begin tonight (Friday 11 December) continuing through Saturday with totals of 30 to 50mm on lower ground.

Towns and villages along the Shannon have been warned to be braced for the worst flooding in that river's catchment for 20 years.

Galway Bay FM reports that four water pumps are already on standby in Portumna, where crews have managed to keep waters from rising over the bridge that connects the south-east Galway town to Tipperary.

Flooding is only the latest issue in the town, as a local councillor has complained about persistent dumping at Portumna Marina from illegally parked vehicles – though the waste has since been removed.

Pollution is also a problem in Clarinbridge, just outside Galway city, where locals fear the area's famous oysters, already downgraded from their 'A' status – allegedly due to runoff from a water treatment plant in Athenry – will be downgraded to the point of shutting down all harvesting. Galway Bay FM has more HERE.

Published in News Update

"Ireland will be one of the hardest-hit countries in Europe and suffer more coastal and river flooding incidents in future, if a deal to limit global warming is not achieved in Paris," said Seán Kelly MEP, a member of the European Parliament's negotiating team at the UN's Global Climate Change Conference in Paris this evening (Thursday).

"Unfortunately, many families in Ireland are once again dealing with the terrible consequences of flood damage to homes, farms and businesses. This is a consequence of climate change which will become a more frequent occurrence in future if we do not take urgent action to lower carbon emissions," he said.

The Ireland South MEP told fellow negotiators in Paris that Ireland is particularly vulnerable to flooding because of high rainfall levels and our Atlantic location.

Mr Kelly further cited last year's study by the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission which examined the possible future Climate Change effects if the global temperature rises by 3.5 degrees Celsius.

"Currently, flooding currently affects 160,000 people in Europe every year but the JRC study revealed that that number could increase to 290,000 in future.

"Across all sectors, Climate Change is causing 190 billion euros worth of damage in the EU annually. But the experts predict that figure could double if no action is taken. It is estimated that flood damage alone could account for €10 billion."

"The message is clear. If current global warming continues unabated, Ireland and the rest of the world will suffer from more flooding incidents. That is why we are here in Paris, pressing our global counterparts to compromise and agree on a deal.

"I believe a deal can be done to prevent this kind of nightmare future. Prevention is better than the cure - the amount of money we spend to repair the damages caused by the effects of Climate Change are far greater than what we could invest now in clean technologies and energy infrastructure that accommodates high share of renewables and so on.

"Reducing emissions now can save our environment, prevent unprecedented levels of damage, like that of the flooding witnessed in Ireland in recent days, and save lives in some cases," Mr Kelly continued.

Published in News Update

#Flooding - The Defence Forces have joined in flood relief efforts in Clare, Limerick and Westmeath as weekend rains risk significant flooding in the region.

As reported yesterday on Afloat.ie, the Shannon Catchment could see its worst flooding in two decades as spring tides exacerbate the effects of last weekend's Storm Desmond, which prompted a rare 'Status Red' warning for rainfall.

RTÉ News reports that the Shannon is already at dangerous levels, with a flood emergency response launched in Athlone after the waterway breached its banks in the Midlands town, threatening 100 homes.

Homes were also evacuated in Clonlara, Co Clare – between the Shannon and the Headache Canal – while the ESB was releasing water at its Inniscarra Dam facility in Cork to manage reservoir levels, warning of a subsequent risk downstream on the River Lee.

Meanwhile, Waterways Ireland has advised boaters to keep their vessels moored during this and other periods of stormy weather "and especially when national weather alerts are in place".

Even when the storms have passed, "users should be aware that the navigations will have changed significantly in nature and character" with the risk of strong currents, rising waters from flash flooding obscuring navigation markers, and falling trees weakened by storm-force winds.

Published in Inland Waterways

#Shannon - The worst flooding in two decades could fall upon the Shannon catchment in the coming days as spring tides accentuate the effects of last weekend's Storm Desmond.

According to The Irish Times, the Office of Public Works has told the National Emergency Co-ordination Committee that the River Shannon from Limerick to Athlone is the one area "giving most concern", with all gauging stations on the waterway showing only rising levels.

And spring tides this coming Friday and Saturday (11-12 December) are set to combine with "the fluvial flood wave coming down the Shannon" that is rated "in the severe category", warned the OPW's Jim Casey, who noted that the Erne catchment is also rising.

Meanwhile, the ESB has increased the flow of water from Parteen Weir at Ardnacrusha to help manage the Shannon's flood waters – but this too may lead to flooding of streets in Limerick city and suburbs.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Shannon Estuary
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