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Displaying items by tag: Ballycotton

As the RNLI prepares to celebrate its 200th anniversary on 4 March, the charity has brought some of its rich history to life with the release of a stunning collection of colourised images.

From community events to candid snapshots, 11 black-and-white images have been painstakingly cleaned and colourised with folds, scratches and dust removed using digital technology to shine new light on 200 years of saving lives at sea.

The striking images from across Ireland and the UK include courageous lifeboat crews, early fundraising street collections and iconic scenes of close-knit communities coming together to launch and recover lifeboats.

Part of the new collection is a photograph taken of Ballycotton coxswain Patrick Sliney, his wife and their son William at an annual meeting in 1936.

Full-length photograph of Ballycotton coxswain Patrick Sliney, Mrs Sliney and son William at an annual meeting in 1936 | Credit: RNLIFull-length photograph of Ballycotton coxswain Patrick Sliney, Mrs Sliney and son William at an annual meeting in 1936 | Credit: RNLI

In that same year, the Daunt Rock Lightship came adrift off Ballycotton in horrendous conditions with 12 people onboard. The lifeboat crew spent 49 hours at sea and eventually rescued all those onboard.

Patrick Sliney was awarded the RNLI Gold Medal for Gallantry and the rest of his crew, including his son William, received Bronze Medals.

Also featured in the collection is the most decorated RNLI lifesaver, Henry Blogg, who was born on 6 February 1876. Blogg served for 53 years on Cromer’s lifeboats in Norfolk, England before retiring in 1947, having saved 873 lives and been awarded many honours including three Gold and four Silver RNLI Medals for Gallantry.

The image of Henry, which first appeared in the Lifeboat Journal in 1916, shows him wearing black oilskins and a sou’wester, which preceded the instantly recognisable yellow waterproofs now associated with the RNLI.

Before and after: A portrait of Henry Blogg, the most decorated RNLI lifesaver, who in his 53 years of service helped save 873 people | Credit: RNLIBefore and after: A portrait of Henry Blogg, the most decorated RNLI lifesaver, who in his 53 years of service helped save 873 people | Credit: RNLI

RNLI heritage and archive research manager Hayley Whiting said: “The carefully coloured images illustrate just a few highlights of the incredible history of lifesaving over the previous two centuries, where over 144,000 lives have been saved to date.

“To see the crew of St Davids lifeboat walking up from the boathouse wearing their traditional red hats, the yellow sou’westers of the children fundraising or the vibrant blue sea off the Isle of Man, the reworked images really do bring a different perspective on some of our archived pictures.

“Each image has been brought to life by our own in-house creative team with hours spent on attention to detail, along with research being undertaken to ensure each one gave a true, lifelike representation.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Ballycotton RNLI, a team of volunteer lifeboat crew, rescued three fishermen on board a 12-metre boat that was disabled 23 miles southeast of Ballycotton lighthouse on the County Cork coast. The rescue happened during the early hours of Sunday morning.

The Austin Lidbury, Ballycotton RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat, received a request to launch by Valentia Coast Guard at 6:55 am to attend to the fishing boat. The boat had suffered difficulties and was disabled and adrift.

The lifeboat quickly made its way southeast towards the stricken vessel. Upon arrival to the scene at 8:08 am, the crew confirmed that everyone on board was safe. The crew established a secure tow line and towed the fishing boat at a speed of six knots.

Ballycotton RNLI and the fishing boat arrived safely at Ballycotton at approximately 12:28 pm. Once the fishing boat was secured, Ballycotton's lifeboat was washed down, refuelled, and ready for service again.

The visibility was poor to moderate, with a wind force of 5/6 and two and a half-metre swell. The lifeboat crew was made up of Coxswain Eolan Walsh, deputy mechanic Mike Kenneally, Síle Scanlon as navigator, Claire McCarthy, Cíaran Walsh, Ronan Lynch, and Eolan Breathnach.

Ballycotton RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat crew of Coxswain Eolan Walsh, deputy mechanic Mike Kenneally, Síle Scanlon as navigator, Claire McCarthy, Cíaran Walsh, Ronan Lynch, and Eolan BreathnachBallycotton RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat crew of Coxswain Eolan Walsh, deputy mechanic Mike Kenneally, Síle Scanlon as navigator, Claire McCarthy, Cíaran Walsh, Ronan Lynch, and Eolan Breathnach

Coxswain Eolan Walsh commented on the call-out, saying, "Thankfully, all three fishermen were wearing life jackets and had called for help as soon as they encountered difficulties. We would advise people to take the correct water safety advice for the activity they are taking part in and to always make sure they have a means of raising the alarm if things go wrong."

The rescue was also a significant milestone for two members of the lifeboat crew. Mike Kenneally, the deputy mechanic, was hailed for his first rescue in his role, and Síle Scanlon was also recognised for her first rescue as a navigator.

The Austin Lidbury, Ballycotton RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat returns to dock post-rescue The Austin Lidbury, Ballycotton RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat returns to dock post-rescue 

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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In a daring rescue operation, a volunteer lifeboat crew from Ballycotton RNLI in County Cork saved the lives of three fishermen who were stranded on an 11m boat that had suffered difficulties and was disabled two and a half miles off Power Head.

The incident occurred during the early hours of this morning.

The Austin Lidbury, Ballycotton RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat, was launched at 2.15 am after a distress call was received from the stranded vessel. The harsh weather conditions with temperatures at freezing and a bitter north-easterly wind of force 5-6 and two-metre swell made the rescue operation extremely challenging.

The lifeboat crew quickly located the vessel and confirmed that all crew members were safe. They then secured a tow line and began towing the boat to Crosshaven as conditions were deemed too unsafe to return to Ballycotton with the vessel in tow. The journey was long and arduous, with the towed vessel arriving at Crosshaven at approximately 5.15 am. During the journey, the lifeboat was escorted in by a pod of friendly dolphins as they entered the mouth of Cork Harbour.

The crew of the lifeboat were hailed for their bravery and quick action in rescuing the stranded fishermen. Ballycotton RNLI Coxswain Eolan Walsh said, "Thankfully, all three fishermen were wearing lifejackets and had called for help as soon as they encountered difficulties. Conditions were extremely cold and difficult, and I am thankful to all the volunteers who answered the call last night."

The lifeboat crew comprised Coxswain Walsh, station mechanic Adam Hussey, Eolan Breathnach as navigator, Cíaran Walsh, Michael Kenneally, Claire McCarthy, Ronan Lynch, and Adrian Erangey.

The incident serves as a reminder to all to take necessary precautions when venturing out to sea and to dial 999 or 112 or use VHF radio CH 16 and ask for the Coast Guard in case of an emergency.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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A boat with one person on board fishing off Ballycotton Island got into difficulty on Saturday (26 August) when the vessel suffered engine failure and was in danger of running aground on the rocks.

At approximately 2.20pm the skipper of the seven-metre pleasure boat raised the alarm. He had dropped anchor and was trying to fix the engine issue himself. However, due to strong currents the boat was at risk of being pushing onto rocks on the island’s shore.

Ballycotton RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat launched promptly amid good visibility but choppy seas and a north-westerly Force 3-4 wind.

Once on scene, the lifeboat coxswain decided that the safest option was to tow the boat back to the nearest safe and suitable port.

With the towline secured, the crew of the lifeboat were able to return the boat safely to Ballycotton Pier by 3.10pm.

Commenting on the call-out, coxswain Eolan Walsh said: “Thanks to the speedy response of the volunteers, we were able to prevent the situation from deteriorating further. The person was wearing a lifejacket and had called for help as soon as they encountered difficulties.

“We would advise people to take the correct water safety advice for the activity they are taking part in and to always make sure they have a means of raising the alarm if things go wrong.”

Saturday’s call came four days after the Ballycotton lifeboat rescued five people from a rudderless yacht in challenging conditions off the East Cork coast.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Five people were rescued from a 44ft yacht that lost its rudder while on passage from the Scilly Isles to Dungarvan on Tuesday (August 22nd).

The yacht was left powerless to steer its course and was located 10 miles south of Mine Head.

The Ballycotton RNLI all-weather Trent class lifeboat, The Austin Lidbury, and a volunteer crew were immediately dispatched following a request for assistance from the French yacht's crew. The RNLI continues to provide an on-call 24/7 search and rescue lifeboat service.

The crew arrived on the scene at 9:15 am and established that all five crew members on board the yacht were unharmed and wearing a flotation device. Due to the location of the vessel and the weather conditions, the decision was made to tow the rudderless yacht back to Ballycotton harbour. The process was slow and difficult due to a southwest gale of force 4 with a moderate swell. The yacht was safely berthed in Ballycotton pier by 1:15 pm.

Commenting on the callout, Ballycotton Deputy Coxswain Barry McDonald said, "I would especially like to thank all the crew who responded to the pager as handling a rudderless yacht is challenging, and also to the ground crew who assisted when we arrived back in the harbour." The volunteer lifeboat crew comprised of Deputy Coxswain Barry McDonald, Mechanic Adam Hussey, Navigator David Casey, and volunteers Eolan Breathnach, Cíaran Walsh, Kate Flemming, and Stephen Sloane.

David Casey was also congratulated on his first call-out as a newly qualified navigator.

The RNLI advises people to adhere to relevant water safety guidance for any water activity to ensure their safety.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Two crew members and its group of ten passengers were rescued today (Friday 19 May) after the boat they were travelling in developed engine failure east of Ballycotton lighthouse.

Ballycotton RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat, The Austin Lidbury was requested to launch by the skipper of the boat at 10.09 am when the passenger boat got into difficulty and was at risk of getting pushed onto the rocks.

Sea conditions were calm, with a very light northerly wind. With the passenger boat drifting towards the rocks the crew from Ballycotton RNLI quickly launched and were able to locate the stricken boat. After assessing the situation and confirming everyone on board was safe and well, a secure tow line was established and they were able to return the boat and its passengers to the safety of Ballycotton harbour by 11.15 am

Commenting on the call out Ballycotton RNLI Coxswain Eolan Walsh, who praised the quick reaction of the skipper said: ‘Thankfully all crew and passengers on board were wearing life jackets. Thanks to the skipper's experience we were quickly able to secure a tow line and prevent further risk to the passengers and damage to the boat. We would remind anyone planning a trip to sea that if you get into difficulty or see somebody else in trouble on the water or along the coast, dial 999 or 112 or use VHF radio CH 16 and ask for the Coast Guard.’

The lifeboat crew were made up of Coxswain Eolan Walsh, station mechanic Adam Hussey, Barry McDonald, Mike Kenneally, Claire McCarthy and Eolan Breathnach.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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If you were in Ballycotton last Friday night you might be forgiven for thinking you had stepped back in time or stepped into the wrong saloon! The Blackbird Bar was transformed into a scene straight out of Tombstone Arizona, complete with straw bales, gingham tablecloths, ‘wanted’ posters of local ‘outlaws’ and bursting with a cowboys and cowgirls ready to muster up and raise vital funds for Ballycotton RNLI.

The night was a huge success. Thanks to the generosity of the 140 guests on the night, and the support of local business and individuals, the event raised a total of €9,248 through ticket sales, donations and a raffle. As a huge bonus Green Rebel pledged to match-fund the figure raised on the night, doubling the total money raised to a phenomenal €18,496.00. And due to the generosity of local businesses who sponsored every aspect of the event, 100% of funds raised will go directly to supporting Ballycotton RNLI.

On arrival, folks were welcomed by Sheriff Áine Flynn and her trusty sidekick Síle Scanlon (dressed as a horse!), who both took a night off from volunteering as crew members on the lifeboat to greet Ballycotton bandits as they arrived. Once all pistols had been accounted for, they were offered a complimentary drink, choosing between a Kentucky Mule (sponsored by Matson’s Wine Store) or beer (courtesy of Heineken), to quench their thirst. Country music filled the air along with the sweet smell of succulent BBQ pig roasting on a spit. The Spitting Pig company cooked up a feast with roasted pig, chicken & vegetarian dishes with a mouth-watering selection of salads that had everyone coming back for more - all generously sponsored by VTSL Ireland.

Once everyone was fed and watered it didn’t take much for The Ryan Phoenix band (sponsored by The Blackbird), to quickly get the crowd on the dance floor. Pumping out a selection of rousing country tunes, a sea of Stetsons, check shirts and denim danced the night away and when the band finished playing DJ Mossie Tattan made sure to keep the fun and dancing going till closing.

Fundraising committee member Fiona Clark said “We pulled this event together in a very short time, but once the theme was agreed it didn’t take long for people to get in the spirit of it, with one local farmer supplying us with straw bales at the last minute. We are very lucky to have such great supporters and patrons of the Ballycotton RNLI, who year after year give so generously to help this crucial service that is run solely on donations. We want to give special thanks to our generous sponsors including The Blackbird Bar, VTSL Ireland, MTA1, Matson’s Wine Store and of course Green Rebel. And there are many more who supported with raffle prizes and donations - it really does take a village, and it was wonderful to see everyone put so much effort into dressing up and having a fun time for a great cause. On the strength of the night, we hope to go bigger again next year. So, if you missed out you have a whole year to plan your costume!”

The RNLI is a registered charity supported solely by donations and fundraising. It costs approximately €250,000 per year to keep the station and lifeboat operational, €1,667 to train one volunteer crew member and €1,786 to kit them out. Funds raised at the event will ensure that the crew has the necessary equipment and training to continue to keep our coastline safe.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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The Ballycotton RNLI fundraising calendar 2023 kicks off in style with a ‘Wild West’ entertainment-filled evening at the Blackbird, Ballycotton on Friday 3rd February from 7.30 pm until late.

Dust off your cowboy hat and pull on your dancing boots for what is going to be one wild shindig. RNLI hungry outlaws can enjoy a lip-smacking hog roast and selection of salads by the The Spitting Pig Company all washed down with a complimentary drink on arrival. When your belly is full you can line dance the night away to music by Ryan Phoenix band followed by a lively country music disco with DJ Mossie. The RNLI will also be holding a raffle on the night to help raise vital funds to support the local station.

Ballycotton RNLI fundraising calendar 2023 kicks off in style with a ‘Wild West’ entertainment-filled evening

Tickets cost just €35 and are available on Eventbrite

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Jaffa, a nine-metre Dutch yacht with six people onboard that suffered a fouled propeller 4.5 nautical miles east of Ballycotton island in the early hours of this morning (Tuesday, 9 August), was brought to safety by the lifeboat crew from Ballycotton RNLI.

Ballycotton RNLI Lifeboat The Austin Lidbury was requested to launch by Valentia Coast Guard at 12.01 am following a request for assistance from the crew of a student training yacht whose propeller was fouled on a lobster pot marker and were unable to sail to the nearest safe harbour as there was not enough wind. They had begun their journey yesterday morning in Kilmore for Cork as part of a college training voyage to circumnavigate Ireland.

With excellent conditions and clear visibility, Ballycotton RNLI was quickly able to locate the stricken yacht and assess the situation. After confirming all people on board were safe, Alan Cott a volunteer crew member boarded the yacht and was able to cut the rope wrapped around the propeller and free of the vessel. Ballycotton RNLI Lifeboat then secured a towrope to the yacht and returned to Ballycotton pier at approximately 2.30am.

Eolan Walsh, Ballycotton RNLI Lifeboat Coxswain, said, ‘It was approximately 11.00 pm when their propeller became fouled. The crew of the Jaffa remained calm and made the correct decision to request assistance from the Irish Coast guard when they encountered propeller difficulties. Everyone on board was wearing a life jacket and were relieved to see us. We would advise people to take the correct water safety advice for the activity they are taking part in and to always make sure they have a means of raising the alarm if things go wrong’.

The crew of the Jaffa expressed their gratitude to Ballycotton RNLI and will remain in Ballycottton until repairs have been carried out before setting sail on the rest of their journey. 

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Three people were brought to safety by Ballycotton RNLI after their pleasure boat suffered engine failure 17 nautical miles south of Helvick Head on Wednesday evening (27 July).

Ballycotton’s all-weather lifeboat Austin Lidbury was requested to launch by Valentia Coast Guard at 6.50pm when the 16.5ft fishing boat reported engine failure.

Weather conditions were calm and once on scene, the lifeboat crew assessed the situation. Alan Cott, a volunteer crew member, boarded the small boat and was able to get the engine started again.

Ballycotton RNLI lifeboat crew made the decision to then escort the boat to the safety of Helvick Harbour before returning to Ballycotton at 10.30pm.

Commenting after the callout, Cott said: “Thankfully conditions were very good and all three people were wearing lifejackets and had called for help as soon as they encountered engine difficulties.

“We would advise people to take the correct water safety advice for the activity they are taking part in and to always make sure they have a means of raising the alarm if things go wrong.”

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Irish Sailing

The Irish Sailing Association, also known as Irish Sailing, is the national governing body for sailing, powerboating and windsurfing in Ireland.

Founded in 1945 as the Irish Dinghy Racing Association, it became the Irish Yachting Association in 1964 and the Irish Sailing Association in 1992.

Irish Sailing is a Member National Authority (MNA) of World Sailing and a member of the Olympic Federation of Ireland.

The Association is governed by a volunteer board, elected by the member clubs. Policy Groups provide the link with members and stakeholders while advising the Board on specialist areas. There is a professional administration and performance staff, based at the headquarters in Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin.

Core functions include the regulation of sailing education, administering racing and selection of Irish sailors for international competition. It is the body recognised by the Olympic Federation of Ireland for nominating Irish qualified sailors to be considered for selection to represent Ireland at the Olympic Games. Irish sailors have medalled twice at the Olympics – David Wilkins and Jamie Wikinson at the 1980 games, and Annalise Murphy at the 2016 games.

The Association, through its network of clubs and centres, offers curriculum-based training in the various sailing, windsurfing and powerboating disciplines. Irish Sailing qualifications are recognised by Irish and European Authorities. Most prominent of these are the Yachtmaster and the International Certificate of Competency.

It runs the annual All-Ireland Championships (formerly the Helmsman’s Championship) for senior and junior sailors.

The Association has been led by leading lights in the sailing and business communities. These include Douglas Heard, Clayton Love Junior, John Burke and Robert Dix.

Close to 100 sailors have represented Ireland at the Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Membership of Irish Sailing is either by direct application or through membership of an affiliated organisation. The annual membership fee ranges from €75 for families, down to €20 for Seniors and Juniors.