Menu

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

In association with ISA Logo Irish Sailing

Displaying items by tag: Dublin Bay

St. Michael’s Rowing Club will host The Hobblers Challenge on the 7th of September. The challenge is a 28km endurance coastal rowing race, which has been taking place since the 1990s on Dublin Bay.

Several courses have been used, predominantly from Dún Laoghaire Harbour to the Kish Lighthouse and back.

Four categories will compete this year: Ladies, Men, Mixed and Under 21.  

The current course, set in 2017, starts at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, at the East Breakwater beneath the Hobblers Memorial, out the harbour mouth, around the landward side of a ‘gate boat’ off Merrion Strand, around Poolbeg Lighthouse, up the Liffey as far as the ESB towers, before doubling back, across the mouth of Dun Laoghaire Harbour, across Scotsman’s Bay, past Sandycove and Bullock Harbours, turning at Coliemore Harbour, before returning to Dun Laoghaire Harbour, finishing at the end of the East Breakwater.

“We are delighted to host this endurance race again. Similar to previous years, the competition is open for traditional skiffs so we are hoping to get as many East Coast rowing clubs taking part as possible,” said James Tedd, St. Michael’s Club Chairperson and race organiser.

Participants can choose between four categories: Ladies, Men, Mixed and Under21. “The latter two are an addition to the 2018 race,” explained Eoin Clarke, Race Registration Officer. “ We aim to be inclusive to experienced rowers of all ages, and we hope that, by introducing the Under21 category, we can help young rowers who transition from the youth level to the adult one get a taste for what endurance racing is, by competing against rowers of the same age. ”

The best times to complete the challenge are 2h47min - a record held by the St. Michaels’ men 2018, and 3h 3min - a record held by the St. Michaels’ ladies. Both records were set in 2018.

Published in Dublin Bay

The Irish Defence Forces, reports Journal.ie, have detained a fishing vessel off the coast of Dublin (yesterday) for allegedly breaching fishing regulations.

The vessel was stopped 20 nautical miles northeast of Howth in Co Dublin by the Naval Service Vessel LÉ George Bernard Shaw.

The boat was brought back to Howth where it was handed over to An Garda­ Sí­ochána.

This is the seventh vessel detained by the Naval Service so far in 2019, according to Defence Forces spokesperson.

“The Defence Forces conducts at sea fishery inspections in line with the service level agreement with the Sea Fishery Protection Authority, as part of its delivery of government services to the state,” they added.

Published in Navy

Race 1

Cruiser 0 IRC: 1. Wow, 2. D-Tox

Cruiser 0 Echo: 1. Wow, 2. D-Tox

Cruiser 1 IRC: 1. White Mischief, 2. Gringo, 3. Bon Exemple

Cruiser 1 Echo: 1. White Mischief, 2. Gringo, 3. Bon Exemple

Cruiser 1 J109: 1. White Mischief

31.7 One Design: 1. Prospect, 2. Levante, 3. Attitude

31.7 Echo: 1. Fiddly Bits, 2. Attitude, 3. Levante

Cruiser 2 IRC: 1. Peridot, 2. Windjammer, 3. Rupert

Cruiser 2 Echo: 1. Springer, 2. Windjammer, 3. Peridot

Cruiser 2 Sigma 33: 1. Rupert, 2. Springer, 3. Pastiche

Cruiser 5 NS-IRC: 1. Persistence

Cruiser 5 Echo: 1. Spirit, 2. Persistence

SB20: 1. Carpe Diem, 2. Venuesworld.com, 3. Sea Biscuit

Flying 15: 1. No Name, 2. Ignis Caput II, 3. Glass Half Full

Ruffian: 1. Ripples, 2. Ruffles, 3. Alias

Shipman: 1. Barossa, 2. Viking, 3. Jo Slim

B211 One Design: 1. Yikes

B211 Echo: 1. Yikes

Mermaid: 1. Red Seal

Race 2

SB20: 1. Venuesworld.com, 2. Carpe Diem, 3. Sea Biscuit

Flying 15: 1. No Name, 2. Ignis Caput II, 3. Betty

Published in DBSC
Tagged under

Whitbread Race competitor Angela Heath will join regular Dublin Bay helms Jean Mitton and Alison Clarke among the inspiring and influential Irish women taking part in the first Pathfinder Women at the Helm event next month.

This new event “encourages women to embrace a role of leadership on the water, and set an example for future female sailors so that helming becomes the norm”. Registration is open HERE.

Despite boys and girls competing against each other in single-handed dinghies, it’s still uncommon to see women leading their own crew, says Irish Sailing. Yet there are many strong women quietly pursuing their passion for sailing.

Among them is Jean Mitton of the Royal St George, who when she started out was often the only woman on a crew outside of family outings.

Jean Mitton 1339Jean Mitton (second from left) on board the family 31.7 Photo: Afloat

“Facing challenges while on the boat has given me the full sailing experience and made me confident in my ability to be at the helm,” says the now 12-year veteran.

CrI Cri 3430Alison Clarke (left) onboard the Quarter Tonner CrI Cri Photo: Afloat

It’s a feeling shared by Alison Clarke, who will be helming the boat she regularly crews — Paul Colton’s Cri Cri — in the event over the weekend of Saturday 17 and Sunday 18 August at the National Yacht Club.

“Sailing has taught me things about leadership that you can’t learn in a classroom or from a textbook,” she says.

Both Jean and Alison surely took inspiration from the likes of Angela Heath, who was part of the pioneering all-woman crew of Tracy Edwards’ Maiden. And now they will have the opportunity to test their skills against Angela as she helms the Beneteau 31.7 Crazy Horse.

Crazy horse 1211The Beneteau 31.7 Crazy Horse with Angela Heath in white top, second from right Photo: Afloat

Angela will also be taking part in a Q&A following a screening on Friday 16 August (National Yacht Club, 6.30pm) of the documentary Maiden, which charts the highs and lows of Edwards and crew in the 1989 edition of the world’s most challenging round-the-world sailing race.

Published in ISA

The Muglins light off Dalkey which marks the southern approaches of Dublin Bay has recently been inspected and recieved routine maintenance, writes Jehan Ashmore.

According to the Commissioners of Irish Lights, the light is an effective and conspicuous aids to navigation (AtoN) for the approaches to Dublin Bay from the south, both during the day and at night.

ILV Granauile, the Irish Lights aids to navigation tender which visits The Muglins (p.13) on an annual basis this year took an anchorage closer to Lamb Island. This is the largest of several smaller islands that form a protective chain leading off Dalkey Island which is closer to the mainland (300 metres) compared to The Muglins which is more exposed been some 500m north-east and situated further out in Dublin Bay.

As part of the Irish Lights' annual planned maintenance programme, work on The Muglins began last Tuesday. This involved a range of checks on the light, the solar panel system (see photo: at top of light) as well as the structure of the tower and the boat landing where Afloat observed a tender from ILV Granuaile transfer personnel and equipment onto the rockey islet.

In addition at The Muglins a risk assessment took place and checks were completed for the station which sports a distinctive white and red band scheme. Noting the inclusion of the central red band was adopted in 1883, three years after the light then designated a beacon (a 30ft stone built structure and conical in shape) was erected according to Bill Long author of 'Bright Light, White Water'. It was between the 9th to 18th centuries where Dublin was far from ideal to conduct itself as a port from which to conduct foreign trade.

Access to Dublin was dangerous due to constantly shifting sandbanks and so Dalkey, two miles south-east of Dun Loaghaire, saw during the Middle Ages for the most part ships instead of using the Port of Dublin took an alternative in Dalkey Sound which afforded relative shelter when at anchorage. This enabled transferring cargoes by lighters ashore to Dalkey's seven fortified town houses/castles built to store the goods which were off-loaded in Dalkey in the Middle Ages, when Dalkey acted as the port for Dublin. 

The Muglins forms part of the Dublin Bay aids to navigation group and it is at the islet where for a long time posed a dangerous hazard to mariners and caused many ships to flounder in these waters. This led to the harbourmaster of Kingstown (Dun Laoghaire), Captain William Hutchison in 1873 to plea for a light to be sited on 'these siren rocks'.

Despite a subesquent list of vessels numbering 12 that Captain Hutchison furnished to the respective authorities at that time, there was indecision between Trinity House, The Board of Trade and the Commissioners of Irish Lights on the plea to erect a light for seafarers. All was too change when a 13th wreck was added by the Captain which ultimately raised the issue again and saw plans to commission the light which was eventually completed in 1880.

In addition to the recent works at The Muglins, ILV Granuaile then proceeded to neighbouring Killiney Bay. Following an overnight anchorage operations took place in a central area closer to the open sea where the coastal shipping lane for Dublin Port is busy with traffic.

The work in Killiney Bay involved ILV Granuaile at an outfall buoy which was contract work that Irish Lights carry out on behalf of Irish Water and where the Shangannagh /Bray Wastewater Treatment Plant (page 3) is located on the shore of the bay near Shankill. The plant close to the Co. Wicklow border was upgraded in 2011 and is capable of treating 43,700m³ of wastewater a day and according to Water Technology is estimated to serve a population of 248,000 people.

The infrastructure upgrade at the plant was carried out by Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council in association with Wicklow County Council and Bray Town Council. The aim of the upgrade on the existing facility was to ensure the plant be in accordance with the Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive and associated Irish Regulations. In addition it allowed the new facility to comply with other EU directives and national regulations meant for environment protection.

Published in Lighthouses

Yachts competing in tonight's Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) racing have been asked to avoid the Cruise Ship 'Star Pride' manoeuvring around number 2 berth and leaving the harbour at 6 pm tonight before Dublin Bay racing.

In a communication to the club, Dun Laoghaire Harbour Master Simon Coate says 'please advise your sailors to keep well clear when she is sailing as she has little water underneath'.

As Afloat's Jehan Ashmore reported earlier today, Star Pride is the fourth of six scheduled callers to the harbour this year. 

According to the Harbour Master, The Star Pride is expected to "back out of the berth tonight" and "swing inside the harbour".

Published in DBSC
Tagged under

Following a first call of Ocean Altantic to Dun Laoghaire Harbour on Monday, the small yet heavily ice-strengthened hulled vessel returned to the port a mere three days later, writes Jehan Ashmore.

So why the return?... the answer lies in a round trip laid on by operator Albatros Expeditions for the cruise industry's travel trade which involved a mini-taster cruise and apt given its destination, Islay. The Scottish island renowned for it's whisky distilleries, is the southernmost of the Inner Hebrides islands located off the nation's south-west coast.

Afloat has also learnt that the 190 passenger capacity cruiseship prior to its debut call to Dun Laoghaire had made a repositioning voyage from Antarctica via Las Palmas, Canary Islands. At this location, the 12,000 gross tonnage ship received a refit in advance of the summer season and was not carrying passengers during its voyage on the Atlantic to the Irish east coast port.

Albratros Expeditions which during its 20 year career has included cruising in the Arctic, was recognisied at a reception held by Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council. The local authority welcomed the Greenland and Danish based operator during a reception hosted by the council's An Cathaoirleach, Ossian Smyth.

As the operator is a new customer to Dun Laoghaire Harbour, this brings to three cruise companies operating this season and in between them handling 6 calls in total. The season runs until September and is set against the backdrop of a recent decision by DLRCoCo to abandon an application for a €30m cruise-berth jetty.

It was on the second call to Dun Laoghaire that Ocean Atlantic initially took anchorage prior to calling within the embracing harbour arms last Thursday. Likewise of the maiden call to the Irish port, the former Soviet era built vessel and last of seven Dmitriy-Shostakovich-class ships took a berth alongside the Carlisle Pier.

The sturdy and businesslike vessel loaded stores using the cruiseship's starboard side ro-ro door located close to the stern. It is understood a stern door was originally fitted when built in 1986 at a Polish shipyard. The somewhat squat superstucture consists of three decks but there are a further six decks within the hull. As for passenger facilities some of which were previously described on Monday's report. 

Ocean Atlantic departed Dun Laoghaire later on Thursday having embarked cruise-paying passengers and on a much longer cruise. The Bahama flagged cruiseship set again a northbound passage through the Irish Sea to Scotland and on this occasion the first port of call was Campbeltown on the Mull of Kintyre.

Published in Cruise Liners

The first-ever Red Bull Cliff Diving event in the Irish Capital saw divers leap from 27m at Dún Laoghaire Harbour, in front of the highest-ever spectator turnout in the World Series’ 10-year history. The Irish stop saw a new name on the top step of the men’s podium, whilst reigning women’s champion, Rhiannan Iffland continued her winning streak on the Irish shores.

Here is everything you need to know:

Romania’s Constantin Popovici won in only his second event. He had placed second in his debut event at the 2019 season opener in El Nido in the Philippines.

Popovici’s victory ends Gary Hunt’s five-event winning streak. He beat the British seven-time champion by just 1.85 points; one of the closest winning margins in World Series history.

American David Colturi placed third in the men’s competition, over 75 points behind Hunt.

There was a more predictable result in the women’s event, with reigning champion Rhiannan Iffland of Australia claiming the win by a dominant 30-point margin.

Canada’s Lysanne Richard placed second, with Mexico’s Adriana Jimenez a further 30 point back in third.

Constantin Popovici (ROU), winning men’s diver said: “I was hoping for a podium place, and wanted to come first, but I wasn’t sure I was going to get it. Some of the athletes went for easier dives today because of the windy conditions, but I went full on and managed to perform better than everyone. Gary [Hunt] is one of the best divers in the world, so I’m really happy with my result.”

Rhiannan Iffland (AUS), winning women’s diver: “Each competition brings new challenges,” she said. “There are always ups and downs. Today went really well. I was scoring straight nines, which is what we all hope for. I went in cold [with no practice dive] to save my body a bit from the cold water and that really worked for me.”

RESULTS – STOP #2, DUBLIN, IRL

Men

1. Constantin Popovici ROU – 454.95pts

2. Gary Hunt GBR – 453.10
3. David Colturi USA – 374.50
4. Alessandro De Rose (W) ITA – 373.00

5. Blake Aldridge GBR – 365.10

Women

1. Rhiannan Iffland AUS – 341.50pts

2. Lysanne Richard CAN – 310.60
3. Adriana Jimenez MEX – 280.60
4. Iris Schmidbauer (W) GER – 275.60

5. Yana Nestsiarava BLR – 262.90

Published in Dublin Bay

Paul O'Higgin's JPK 1080 Rockabill VI gave notice of her intentions this season with a win in the first race of the DBSC season tonight on Dublin Bay.

The cruisers zero competitor from the Royal Irish Yacht Club was the winner on both IRC and ECHO beating clubmates Rodney and Keith Martin sailing the Beneteau 44.7 Lively Lady in both handicaps.

Although entered, George Sisk's new XP44 WOW did not race in the cruisers zero division tonight. Instead, her crew were sail testing the smart new marque in Scotsman's Bay.

Meanwhile, Rockabill is entered for Saturday's first ISORA race of the season, the Viking Marine sponsored Coastal Race now the subject of Storm Hannah forecast for Saturday.

Force three to four winds from the south made for a brisk start to the season on both the DBSC Red and Blue courses tonight, especially with an ebb tide that produced a wind against tide chop on Dublin Bay.

In class one, another RIYC boat, Andrew Craig's J109 Chimaera, was the winner in IRC beating John Hall's sistership Something Else from the National Yacht Club. On Echo, it was an RIYC boat again, the Mills 36 Raptor (Denis Hewitt) that took the win from Paul Kirwan's Beneteau 36.7 Boomerang from the Royal St. George Yacht Club. 

On the Freebird course, in Scotsman's Bay, there was a mixed turnout of one designs with disappointing turnouts for some classes including a single Dragon and only two SB20s. However, the Flying Fifteens made up for this with a fine turnout of 12 boats for the first race that was won by Glass Half Full. Second was Keith Poole's The Gruffalo and third David Mulvin's new Ingis Caput II.

DBSC Results for 25/04/2019


Cruiser 0 IRC: 1. Rockabill, 2. Lively Lady, 3. Hot Cookie

Cruiser 0 Echo: 1. Rockabill, 2. Lively Lady, 3. Hot Cookie

Cruiser 1 IRC: 1. Chimaera, 2. Something Else, 3. White Mischief

Cruiser 1 Echo: 1. Raptor, 2. Boomerang, 3. Chimaera

Cruiser 1 J109: 1. Chimaera, 2. Something Else, 3. White Mischief

31.7 One Design: 1. Prospect, 2. Camira, 3. Crazy Horse

31.7 Echo: 1. Levante, 2. Camira, 3. Bluefin Two

Cruiser 2 IRC: 1. Rupert, 2. Springer, 3. Peridot

Cruiser 2 Echo: 1. Enchantress, 2. Springer, 3. Peridot

Cruiser 2 Sigma 33: 1. Rupert, 2. Springer, 3. Enchantress

Cruiser 3A IRC: 1. Running Wild, 2. Starlet, 3. Supernova

Cruiser 3A Echo: 1. Running Wild, 2. Starlet, 3. Supernova, 1. Wynward

Cruiser 5A NS-IRC: 1. Persistence, 1. Cevantes, 2. Gung-Ho, 3. Molly

Cruiser 5A Echo: 1. Spirit, 2. Persistence, 1. Sweet Martini, 2. Gung-

SB20: 1. Venuesworld.com, 2. Carpe Diem

Sportsboat SptBt. Hcap: 1. Jester, 2. Zelus, 3. RIYC 1

Flying 15: 1. Glass Half Full, 2. The Gruffalo, 3. Ignis Caput II

Ruffian: 1. Bandit, 2. Shannagh, 3. Ruffles

Shipman One Design: 1. Jo Slim, 2. Curraglas, 3. Viking

B211 One Design: 1. Chinook, 2. Small Wonder, 3. Beeswing

B211 Echo: 1. Small Wonder, 2. Beeswing, 3. Plan B

Published in DBSC
Tagged under

#irishports - A most unusual caller to Dun Laoghaire Harbour took place recently with the arrival of a tanker marking a rare event that has not occurred in three decades, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Early on Sunday afternoon the 4,107 gross tonnage tanker Thun Gemini had arrived into the south Dublin Bay harbour.

According to Afloat sources the 2003 built ship is in port for maintenance reasons. Otherwise the 114m Dutch flagged tanker is a regular on the short sea route between Milford Haven, south Wales and the Irish capital.

It was soon after the arrival of Afloat to the port yesterday that came an unexpected surprise as the ship's stern free-fall lifeboat was launched. This led to the splash generated as the lifeboat made contact with the water close to the Carlisle Pier head. 

The exersise to launch the enclosed orange lifeboat rekindled personal memories on the occasion of the previous tanker that visited the harbour. This took place in April 1989. More shall be revealed on Afloat next week on the 30th anniverary of that unique event which is among numerous chapter's that have enriched the harbour's maritime heritage. 

Thun Gemini today remains berthed in port having sailed at the weekend the short distance from one of the four berths at the oil jetty terminal in neighbouring Dublin Port. The terminal has a 330,000 tonne facility handling oil products, bitumen, chemicals and liqued petroleum gases that are linked to a common user pipe line system.

The tanker is operated by Thun Tankers, part of Erik Thun AB as previously reported on Afloat.ie. The family owned shipping business is located in Lidköping on the southern shores of Lake Vänern, the third largest lake in Europe, which is connected to the sea by a shipping canal.

Published in Irish Ports
Tagged under
Page 1 of 88

William M Nixon has been writing about sailing in Ireland and internationally for many years, with his work appearing in leading sailing publications on both sides of the Atlantic. He has been a regular sailing columnist for four decades with national newspapers in Dublin, and has had several sailing books published in Ireland, the UK, and the US. An active sailor, he has owned a number of boats ranging from a Mirror dinghy to a Contessa 35 cruiser-racer, and has been directly involved in building and campaigning two offshore racers. His cruising experience ranges from Iceland to Spain as well as the Caribbean and the Mediterranean, and he has raced three times in both the Fastnet and Round Ireland Races, in addition to sailing on two round Ireland records. A member for ten years of the Council of the Irish Yachting Association (now the Irish Sailing Association), he has been writing for, and at times editing, Ireland's national sailing magazine since its earliest version more than forty years ago

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

mgm sidebutton
bjmarine sidebutton
xyachts sidebutton

Featured Associations

ISA sidebutton
ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Events

tokyo sidebutton
sovscup sidebutton
vdlr sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
viking sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
sellingboat sidebutton

Please show your support for Afloat by donating