Menu

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Royal Irish Yacht Club

The Notice of Race and online entry has been published for the Unio-sponsored ICRA National Championships 2024 at the Royal Irish Yacht Club this August.

Organisers plan to split fleets into Class 0, Class 1, Class 2, Class 3 and Non-Spinnaker for the event that runs from 30th August- 1st September. Up to 100 yachts are expected to compete.

The Notice of Race is downloadable below.

There will be a maximum of four races on any day. Seven races are scheduled.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, this year’s ICRA Nationals mark the beginning of a unique series of major sailing championships hosted by the Royal Irish in Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

The closing date for entries on this link is 19th August 2024.

Published in ICRA

The chance to discuss and debate the big issues in Irish cruiser racing is on the table in February at the ICRA National Conference and AGM on Saturday, 10th February 2024

The Royal Irish Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin, which recently unveiled three major championship cruiser racer events for 2024, will host the annual pow-wow.

As Afloat previously reported, ICRA Commodore Dave Cullen has already been looking forward to a busy sailing calendar in 2024.

Last Friday, the South Coast Offshore Racing Association (SCORA) debated what defines a cruiser-racer at its AGM at Royal Cork Yacht Club, and that's an issue that may raise its head again in Dun Laoghaire.

 ICRA Commodore Dave Cullen ICRA Commodore Dave Cullen

As well as main speakers and the sailor's forum there will be updates from the major events planned in the year, and an update on ICRA activities, followed by the AGM.

The conference will start at 10:30 am, followed by the AGM, and close at lunchtime.

The full agenda and more details will be issued later this month says Cullen.

Published in ICRA

The latest news on the Dun Laoghaire waterfront is that the J/109 Europeans 2024 will be part of this year’s intense series of cruiser/racer regattas at the Royal Irish YC in late August and early September. It’s an organisational breakthrough in line with the club’s overall thinking, as voiced by RIYC Sailing Manager Mark McGibney.

He reckons that if you get a visiting boat and crew to commit to one event, the fact that another is then readily available in a matter of days means that they’ll probably do that as well. They’ll thereby optimise the return on the significant logistical efforts that have been required to have the boat and crew in the right place at the right time and in proper order too.

Mark McGibney has been Sailing Manager of the Royal Irish YC for 31 years of continual improvement in the club’s functioning, while somehow also finding the time to be cox’n of the Dun Laoghaire lifeboatMark McGibney has been Sailing Manager of the Royal Irish YC for 31 years of continual improvement in the club’s functioning, while somehow also finding the time to be cox’n of the Dun Laoghaire lifeboat

In this options-rich but time-scarce era, sailing shares the problem of all participant sports in that it has to keep finding new event formats - or at least fresh ways to re-develop established championships - in order to facilitate the mutating interests and decreasing free time of those taking part.

At its most simple, it is easy to think it’s only a matter of finding a concentrated gold standard regatta concept, and then you simply add water. If only. For if we take a couple of steps back from our modern way of sailing, we realise that it’s wholly a vehicle sport. The additional and often challenging logistics of location precision for vehicle and crew alike indicates much personal effort and planning, as it can begin from a considerable distance if a campaign is planned in an event at another leading sailing centre.

The ICRA Nationals fleet (seen here in their 2023 championship at Howth) will start the three-event programme with their three-day Nationals on Dublin Bay on 30th August-1st September. Photo: Afloat.ie/David O’BrienThe ICRA Nationals fleet (seen here in their 2023 championship at Howth) will start the three-event programme with their three-day Nationals on Dublin Bay on 30th August-1st September. Photo: Afloat.ie/David O’Brien

A CHALLENGE EVEN WITH ROAD-TRAILING

This is difficult even when the boat is easily road trailed. But when it’s a sizeable cruiser-racer, it sometimes happens that the racing itself is less effort and definitely more sport than the voyaging necessary to get the boat there.

This was fine when the boats really were cruiser-racers, and longer holiday periods meant you could cruise properly in relaxed style in getting to the next start. But in these days of 24/7 work attention for many folk, a ten day complete break is regarded as self-indulgence, and the three or four day long weekend format has taken over many once week-long events. Consequently time-constrained delivery trips are just that, and nothing more.

ROYAL IRISH CHAMPIONSHIP PROGRAMME GIVES GREAT VALUE IN A FORTNIGHT

The line-up at the RIYC indicates some even greater time compression, with the headline events shaping up as:

  • IRISH CRUISER/RACING ASSOC. NATIONALS: 30th Aug – 1st September 2024
  • KEY YACHTING J CUP IRELAND (INC J/109 EUROS) 7th-8th September 2024
  • RORC IRC EUROS: 10th-15th September 2024

This means that although at first it seems as if you have the entire tail end of the season packed with top level events at the RIYC, the reality is that boats from elsewhere will only need to think of being in Dun Laoghaire for slightly more than a fortnight.

The underlying theory stems from the review undertaken by Ric Morris’s special committee some years ago to analyse which locations best suited the staging of the ICRA Nationals. He summed up their findings in the terse statement: “Follow The Numbers”. In other words, the ICRA Nats should preferably be staged in Top Tier sailing centres where there are many potential entrants already based. In terms of contemporary reality, this means Kinsale, Crosshaven, Dun Laoghaire and Howth.

The Scottish J/109 Jings has it every which way, as that symbol at the top of her mainsail indicates she is eligible to race with the RC35 fleet. She can also race as a J/109 either on IRC or One-Design, and beyond that she is eligible for the Round Ireland, the Dun Laoghaire-Dingle, and the Fastnet RacesThe Scottish J/109 Jings has it every which way, as that symbol at the top of her mainsail indicates she is eligible to race with the RC35 fleet. She can also race as a J/109 either on IRC or One-Design, and beyond that she is eligible for the Round Ireland, the Dun Laoghaire-Dingle, and the Fastnet Races

For the fact is that, unlike many other keen sailing countries, the average Irish sailor prefers to have his or her boat based almost within walking distance. We find it odd that people like a two-hour travel gap between home and boat in order to get in the right frame of mind to go sailing. And we find it even odder that there’s such an organisation as the Chipping Norton Yacht Club, remotely rural in England’s Cotswold Hills, with the members gathering mid-week in an ancient country pub, attired in their sailing clothes, to discuss the previous weekend’s RORC race in the English Channel.

But today we’ll by-pass the corollary of that, which might be the conclusion that if you have to regularly travel for some hours to go racing under sail, then you’ll put more effort into it than those who are only minutes from home. For if someone living in the greater Dun Laoghaire area happens to have a J/109, in 2024 they’re getting the best of many worlds, often within sight of home.

J CUP AN INSTANT SUCCESS

One of 2023’s new events was the Key Yachting J Cup Ireland in late August, also at the RIYC. J/Boat people are something of a tribe within themselves. For sure, most of their larger craft can be comfortably cruised, and many do, but there’s no doubting that the majority are in it for the racing game. Thus when the J Cup Ireland was first proposed, it was assumed that such a bright idea must have arisen years ago, but for some reason had failed to ignite.

Not so, although there was some post-covid delay. Yet it simply arose for the 2023 season, and in jig time achieved the instant success which made for one of the highlights of the year despite its compressed two day format, with J Boat crews feeding off each other’s enthusiasm to such an extent that we now feel it has been on the go for years.

History in the making. J/80 skipper Pat O’Neill (HYC) is the first winner of the J Cup Ireland after 2023’s tough championship at the RIYC. He is seen here (left) with Mark Mansfield (J Boats Ireland, and Commodore Jerry Dowling (RIYC). Photo: Key YachtingHistory in the making. J/80 skipper Pat O’Neill (HYC) is the first winner of the J Cup Ireland after 2023’s tough championship at the RIYC. He is seen here (left) with Mark Mansfield (J Boats Ireland, and Commodore Jerry Dowling (RIYC). Photo: Key Yachting

Yet the fact is that now Pat O’Neill of Howth is written into the sailing records as being the first overall winner of the J Cup Ireland with his internationally-successful J/80 Mojo, while Barry Cunningham of the host club won the hyper-hot J/109s under the One-Design format with Chimaera, and Johnny Murphy from Howth with Outrajeous won the IRC division, and then went on to win the ICRA Nationals at his home port.

CONCENTRATION OF LATER EVENTS BALANCES EARLY SEASON PROLIFERATION OF MAJORS

Another factor in the need to pile so much into a fortnight-plus in late season reflects the time-consuming reality of established early and mid-season pillar events. Late May sees both the Wave Regatta at Howth, and the Scottish Series at Tarbert. Then in June there’s the SSE Renewables Round Ireland race from Wicklow, while July has Volvo Cork Week at Crosshaven, with an early July re-staging of the 1860-founded Kingstown to Queenstown Race – aka the Dublin Bay to Cork Harbour Race – being run as a useful feeder of enormous historical significance,

After Volvo Cork Week, before anyone has a chance to get focused on positioning boats in Dun Laoghaire for some or all of the Royal Irish late season offerings, there’s Calves Week at Schull. This is something of a wolf in sheep’s clothing, as it portrays itself as a modern take on the easygoing West Cork Regattas of yore, but the racing is razor sharp.

EVERYTHING TO BE IN PLACE AT ROYAL IRISH

All of this does mean that by the time the SailFest gets going back in Dun Laoghaire, there’s a danger that some competing folk might already have becoming jaded, but by making the focal point the Royal Irish YC, with its unique location right on Dun Laoghaire Marina where it provides such comprehensive facilities that noted racers such as Paul O’Higgins’s JPK 10.80 Rockabill VI and Pete Smyth’s Sunfast 3600 are dry-sailed, they can guarantee a world class regatta base.

RIGHT PEOPLE ON THE JOB

But even with the best of facilities in place, it’s not worth a row of beans without experienced can-do experts in the key roles, and in addition to having the multi-talented Mark McGibney permanently in his overall managerial role, they have the hugely experienced Fintan Cairns chairing a small but powerful Overall Committee which will be keeping a close eye on how the three big events are taking shape, and when and if synergies can be activated between them.

Fintan Cairns when he stood down after serving his term as Commodore Dublin Bay SC twenty years ago. He continues to serve sailing in Ireland in many capacitiesFintan Cairns when he stood down after serving his term as Commodore Dublin Bay SC twenty years ago. He continues to serve sailing in Ireland in many capacities

We did a profile on Fintan a while back here, and he continues to be a quiet force for the good in Irish sailing. It was typical of him that when he stood down from being Commodore of Dublin Bay Sailing Club in 2002, he promptly set about with the late Jim Donegan of Crosshaven and Denis Kiely of Kinsale to bring the Irish Cruiser-Racer Association into being, thereby providing an effective focal point for a large but amorphous sector in Irish sailing, while today in Dun Laoghaire his organisational interests include the annual Turkey Shoot series leading up to Christmas, and the Spring Chicken series which gets under way again next month.

SPECIALIST SUB-COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN

Each event will have its own organisational setup, with ICRA being much-involved in its own championship, while the RIYC’s Paul McCarthy is Chairing the Committee running the J/Cup and Euros, and former RIYC flag officer Patrick Burke of the keenly-sailed First 40.7 Prima Forte heads up the group running the big one, the IRC Europeans.

Patsy Burke is a serious person, yet his favourite selfie is this cheerful sunrise person aboard Prima Forte, saluting the dawn with the Royal Irish colours. Photo: Patrick BurkePatsy Burke is a serious person, yet his favourite selfie is this cheerful sunrise person aboard Prima Forte, saluting the dawn with the Royal Irish colours. Photo: Patrick Burke

GOLD AND SILVER FLEETS IN IRC EUROS?

Admittedly with the J/109 Europeans now added to the J Cup Ireland, the overall architecture of this very important fortnight has been somewhat re-balanced in terms of event significance. But by having the IRC Europeans in the heart of a large-fleet sailing centre, Patsy Burke has had to develop some innovative thinking to give some locally-focussed boats an extra incentive to take part, with a selection of mid-fleet awards.

When I suggested that this would amount to Gold and Silver fleets, he demurred, as there would be no formal fleet-placing division at mid-series. But nevertheless that’s the way the ordinary sailors are going to see it. In fact, with some very hot-shot overseas boats and crews bringing the IRC Euros at the Royal Irish YC on Dublin Bay in September into focus, the waterfront pundits will be suggesting that there should be Gold, Silver, Bronze and Leather Divisions in the final tally to make sure that some of the trophies stay at home.

Follow the Numbers….By staging three major events in close succession at Dun Laoghaire, the Royal Irish YC underlines just how conveniently its location relates to a large population and a good sailing areaFollow the Numbers….By staging three major events in close succession at Dun Laoghaire, the Royal Irish YC underlines just how conveniently its location relates to a large population and a good sailing area

Published in W M Nixon
Tagged under

Dun Laoghaire Harbour will move centre-stage in the Royal Ocean Racing Club calendar in 2024 when the club's European IRC Championships will be held for the first time in Dún Laoghaire by the Royal Irish Yacht Club.

It will be part of RORC's Season's Points Championship, which is the world's largest offshore racing series. Last year, 9223 sailors raced in an astounding variety of 729 offshore certified boats.

RORC Season's Points Championship is the world's largest Photo: Paul Wyeth/RORCRORC Season's Points Championship is the world's largest Photo: Paul Wyeth/RORC

Over the past ten editions of the RORC Season’s Points Championship, the overall winning boat has always been under 47ft (14.33m) and, more often than not, crewed by a Corinthian team. The overall winner is decided by the IRC Rating Rule, jointly administered by the RORC and the UNCL Pôle Course du YCF. The overall trophies in nearly all the world's blue riband offshore races are awarded using the IRC rating system.

The 2024 RORC Season’s Points Championship is already underway; the first points-scoring race was the Rolex Middle Sea Race held in October. Class winners for the RORC Season are decided by the best five race results over the season which ends in September 2024. The overall win for the Jazz Trophy goes to the boat with the most points from all of the scoring races.

The Season's Points Championship features high-performance multihulls racing under the MOCRA RuleThe Season's Points Championship features high-performance multihulls racing under the MOCRA Rule

IRC time correction gives an equal chance of winning to a huge variety of boats with professional teams racing against pro-am, as well as passionate Corinthian crews. The Championship features high-performance multihulls racing under the MOCRA Rule and the pocket-rocket Class40s, which have been a feature of the Championship for over a decade. Each contest is highly competitive with trophies and races dating back over 100 years. Winning any race in the RORC Season’s Points Championship is worthy of praise and celebration.

The RORC Caribbean 600 race is an early fixture in the 2024 Season's Points ChampionshiThe RORC Caribbean 600 race is an early fixture in the 2024 Season's Points Championship

The next two scoring races are the RORC Transatlantic Race and the RORC Caribbean 600. After that, all the RORC Season's Points Championship races are held in Northern Europe with the vast majority starting on the Royal Yacht Squadron Line, Cowes.

The RORC 2024 Racing Calendar is here

During 2024, the Royal Ocean Racing Club is organising or assisting with four inshore racing events. The RORC Easter Challenge, The GBR IRC National Championships, The Vice Admiral’s Cup and the IRC European Championships. All of the inshore regattas will feature multiple races per day on technical windward leeward racecourses or longer inshore races.

The RORC Easter Challenge runs from 29th – 31st March in Cowes, IOW Photo: Paul WyethThe RORC Easter Challenge runs from 29th – 31st March in Cowes, IOW Photo: Paul Wyeth

For over 20 years, the Royal Ocean Racing Club has held a training regatta over the Easter Weekend. World Sailing Rules on outside assistance are relaxed, so for no additional cost to the teams, hand-picked coaches can provide pin-point assistance to get crews of any level up to speed. Three days of racing are organised in The Solent from Easter Friday to Easter Sunday.

The GBR IRC Nationals will be held from the 25th – 27th May in Poole, Dorset Photo: Paul WyethThe GBR IRC Nationals will be held from the 25th – 27th May in Poole, Dorset Photo: Paul Wyeth

The GBR IRC National Championships was first held in 1999 and for the first time the championships will be held as part of International Paint Poole Regatta. Multiple races will be held in Poole Bay and adjacent waters. In over two decades of competition the overall win has been achieved by a huge variety of boats. Individual IRC Class National Champions will also be decided.

The RORC Vice Admiral’s Cup will run from 6th – 8th September and 14th -15th September at Cowes, IOW Photo: Paul WyethThe RORC Vice Admiral’s Cup will run from 6th – 8th September and 14th -15th September at Cowes, IOW Photo: Paul Wyeth

This year the racing is split over two weekends and is being organised by RORC and the Royal Thames Yacht Club. With an accent on one-design racing the first weekend will be for the Cape31 and J/70 classes, whilst the second weekend will host the Performance 40, J/111, J/109, HP30 and Quarter ton classes. The Vice Admiral’s Cup has always featured a full social programme. The RORC Cowes Clubhouse will be regatta central for fun filled evening entertainment, especially the Prize Givings.

The IRC European Championships will run from the Royal Irish Yacht Club, Dun Laoghaire from the 10th to15th September Photo: DLR/Simon BerrowThe IRC European Championships will run from the Royal Irish Yacht Club, Dun Laoghaire from the 10th to15th September Photo: DLRCoCo/Simon Berrow

As Afloat previously reported, the 2024 European Championships will be held for the first time in Dún Laoghaire by the Royal Irish Yacht Club. Three days of action with multiple races per day will be held in Dún Laoghaire and adjacent waters. A strong Irish presence is expected as well as teams from England, Scotland and Wales, plus likely participation from teams from all over Northern Europe. No doubt the atmosphere at the RIYC will be as charged as the racing in Dublin Bay.

The RORC Race Team of Steve Cole and Janet Grosvenor Photo: RORCThe RORC Race Team of Steve Cole and Janet Grosvenor Photo: RORC

RORC Racing Manager Steve Cole and the RORC Race Team are excited about the 2024 Season. “Despite 2024 not being a ‘Fastnet Year’, the RORC Race Team are preparing and planning for a very busy season with 16 offshore races and four inshore regattas, including the IRC National and European Championships,” commented Steve Cole. “The RORC Cowes Clubhouse is undergoing a major redevelopment this winter and unfortunately will not be ready for the Easter Challenge. However, thanks to the support of the Royal Yacht Squadron, the post-race debriefings will take place in the RYS pavilion. Once the RORC Clubhouse and its purpose-designed building is ready, it will also become home to the RORC Race Office, as well as a superb venue for Club Members and their guests to enjoy social events. The RORC has always co-operated with other yacht clubs and we will be giving full support to the championship regattas in Poole and Dublin.”

Published in RORC

In 2024, the Royal Irish Yacht Club (RIYC) in Dun Laoghaire Harbour will host a unique schedule of major sailing championships, promising three weeks of 'premiere keelboat racing', representing a major boost to sailing on the capital's waters. 

ICRA Nationals 2024

As Afloat reported previously, the events will kick off with the 2024 Irish Cruiser Racing Asociation (ICRA) National Championships, where yachts from all classes will compete on exciting Dublin Bay courses.

The Royal Irish Yacht Club at Dun Laoghaire Harbour (pictured bottom left) will host a unique schedule of major sailing championships, promising three weeks of 'premiere keelboat racing' on Dublin Bay in 2024 The Royal Irish Yacht Club at Dun Laoghaire Harbour (pictured at bottom right) will host a unique schedule of major sailing championships, promising three weeks of 'premiere keelboat racing' on Dublin Bay (above) in 2024 

The Irish Cruiser Racing Association's National Championship is an annual event that has taken place every autumn since the very first Championship race in 2003 and is expected to produce up to 100 boats for its 2024 edition on Dublin Bay at the Royal Irish Yacht Club Photo: AfloatThe Irish Cruiser Racing Association's National Championship is an annual event that has taken place every autumn since the very first Championship race in 2003 and is expected to produce up to 100 boats for its 2024 edition on Dublin Bay at the Royal Irish Yacht Club Photo: Afloat

The national championships are scheduled to run from Friday, 30th August to Sunday, 1st September, and the shoreside entertainment is expected to be plentiful, the RIYC says. 

The event is timed to follow the last Thursday night race of the Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) season.

The Irish Cruiser Racing Association's National Championship will provide for IRC Cruisers in IRC Zero, One, Two, Three and White Sail divisions Photo: AfloatThe Irish Cruiser Racing Association's National Championship will provide for IRC Cruisers in IRC Zero, One, Two, Three and White Sail divisions Photo: Afloat

J Cup Ireland

Crews of J boats will barely have time to hose down their yachts and fold away their sails before the Key Yachting J Cup Ireland kicks off with preliminaries in the RIYC on Friday, 6th September 2024. 

J24 racing will be one of the divisions featured in the J Cup Ireland at the Royal Irish Yacht Club Photo: AfloatJ24 racing will be one of the divisions featured in the J Cup Ireland at the Royal Irish Yacht Club next September Photo: Afloat

This successful event was first run in the RIYC in 2023, and it returns with back-to-back racing on the weekend of Saturday 7th and Sunday 8th September 2024.

Racing over three consecutive weekends, from August 30th to September 1st, the Royal Irish Yacht Club will stage the ICRA Nationals 2024, then the Key Yachting J-Cup Ireland 2024 and conclude with the IRC European Championships 2024 on 10th to 15th September Photo: AfloatRacing over three consecutive weekends, from August 30th, the Royal Irish Yacht Club will stage the ICRA Nationals 2024, then the Key Yachting J-Cup Ireland 2024 and conclude with the IRC European Championships 2024 on 10th to 15th September Photo: Afloat

Organisers expect strong interest from England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, given the opportunity to race in the ICRA's and/or the IRC Europeans the week before and the week after.

The ease of delivery from Dartmouth to Dun Laoghaire is expected to result in additional entries, especially after the Dartmouth Royal Regatta, which includes the UK National Championships.

IRC Europeans

The three weeks of competition will be crowned by the IRC European Championships, scheduled to run from 12th – 15th September 2024.

A number of strong Irish entries, including ICRA Commodore Dave Cullen and Nigel Biggs's Beneteau 50 Checkmate XV (above), are expected for September's IRC European Championships at the Royal Irish Yacht Club Photo: AfloatA number of strong Irish entries, including ICRA Commodore Dave Cullen and Nigel Biggs's Beneteau 50 Checkmate XV (above), are expected for September's IRC European Championships at the Royal Irish Yacht Club Photo: Afloat

The event will be run with the Royal Ocean Racing Club (RORC), bringing the cream of Grand Prix cruiser racers to Dun Laoghaire, promising to be a spectacular event for both participants and spectators.

The RIYC is partnering with the RORC to prepare a format inclusive of racing for Club, Regatta, and Professional sailors.

The 2024 IRC European Championships will include racing for Club, Regatta, and Professional sailors at Dun Laoghaire Photo: AfloatThe 2024 IRC European Championships will include racing for Club, Regatta, and Professional sailors at Dun Laoghaire Photo: Afloat

The events' consecutive scheduling allows visiting boats to come and compete in their pick of top-level racing and enjoy some downtime with friends and family. Dublin is only 20 minutes away by metro and is full of sights and experiences for fellow travellers and Coldplay fans alike.

The Preliminary Notice of Race will be issued in the next few weeks, with enthusiastic participation in the events expected, says the RIYC.

Royal Irish Yacht Club Commodore, Jerry DowlingRoyal Irish Yacht Club Commodore, Jerry Dowling has unveiled three major sailing championships for his Dun Laoghaire club in 2024

“We are delighted to be hosting this unique sailing jamboree in the Royal Irish Yacht Club next year. Our club’s excellent facilities, under the stewardship of our sailing manager, Mark McGibney, are being geared up to welcome all the sailors and guests. It is a wonderful opportunity for Dun Laoghaire to show the world what a fantastic location it is for yacht racing. There are many attractions for the visiting crews, their family and friends to enjoy,” said RIYC Commodore Jerry Dowling.

Published in Royal Irish Yacht Club
Tagged under

Dun Laoghaire Harbour's Saskia Tidey will make her third Olympic Games appearance in 2024 after being named as one of ten sailors for Team GB.

Returning for another tilt at Olympic glory is Saskia Tidey, who, with two previous Olympic Games under her belt, will be the most experienced member of the sailing team.

Tidey, of the Royal Irish Yacht Club, is picked in the women’s skiff class alongside crew mate Freya Black, the youngest sailor in the Team GB sailing line-up at 22 years old.

As regular Afloat readers will know, Tidey first sailed in the Olympics in Rio 2016 for Ireland but switched to Team GB for Tokyo 2020 due to a lack of opportunities in the skiff class at home.

Olympic medallists Emma Wilson, John Gimson and Anna Burnet, who recently broke the record for the fastest crossing between Northern Ireland and Scotland in their foiling catamaran, are also among ten sailors named by the British Olympic Association (BOA) as the first Team GB athletes selected for Paris 2024 Olympic Games.

The trio headline a new-look group of elite sailors representing seven of the ten Olympic sailing classes, as the team is announced at London’s St Pancras Station, home of the Eurostar.

Tokyo 2020 silver medal winners Gimson and Burnet sealed their Paris place with a bronze in the mixed multihull fleet at the Olympic test event in July, followed by the runners-up spot at the World Championships in August. 

Wilson also enjoyed a solid summer, with bronze at the iQFOiL European Championships followed up with a silver at the test event in Marseille, the venue for the Paris 2024 sailing competition.

Her selection for Team GB is all the more impressive given she has only been racing the iQFOiL, the foiling windsurfer new for Paris 2024, for two years.

James Peters and Fynn Sterritt will look to continue Britain’s success in the men’s skiff on their Olympic debut, following in the footsteps of Tokyo 2020 gold medallists Dylan Fletcher and Stuart Bithell.

Windsurfer Sam Sills earned his place with Team GB after winning the men’s iQFOiL class at the illustrious Princess Sofia regatta in Mallorca this year, following it up with a fifth at the Sailing World Championships.

Irish Sea sailor Michael Beckett will pick up the mantle in the men’s dinghy and attempt to break Australia’s three-Games winning streak in the class.

Meanwhile, Ellie Aldridge’s historic European title win just two weeks ago secured her place as the sole representative in the women’s kite class, the second of the two new sailing disciplines for Paris 2024.

Mark Robinson, Team GB Sailing Team Leader and RYA Performance Director, said: “Announcing this amazing group of sailors as the first athletes for Team GB is a real privilege. They are the best of the best and have all rightly earned their spots thanks to some fantastic performances over the past year.

“We have a lot of pressure and expectation on us to maintain our record as the most successful Olympic nation, but I have no doubt that the sailors announced today are the ones who can help us succeed in that challenge in Marseille next summer.”

Team GB has a rich history of excellence in Olympic sailing competition, having won 64 medals, including 31 golds, more than any other nation.

Former Team GB athletes Sir Ben Ainslie and Hannah Mills are the most successful male and female Olympic sailors of all time; Ainslie with four golds and a silver, Mills with two golds and a silver.

The sailors selected for Team GB at Paris 2024 are:

  • John Gimson and Anna Burnet – Mixed Multihull (Nacra 17)
  • James Peters and Fynn Sterritt – Men’s Skiff (49er)
  • Freya Black and Saskia Tidey – Women’s Skiff (49erFX)
  • Emma Wilson – Women’s Windsurfing (iQFOiL)
  • Sam Sills – Men’s Windsurfing (iQFOiL)
  • Ellie Aldridge – Women’s Kite (Formula Kite)
  • Michael Beckett – Men’s Dinghy (ILCA 7)
Published in Royal Irish Yacht Club

The Royal Irish Yacht Club will capitalise on its position as the leading Dun Laoghaire Harbour keelboat club when it hosts three major keelboat regattas in September 2024.

Racing over three consecutive weekends, from August 30th to September 1st, the RIYC will stage the ICRA Nationals 2024, then the Key Yachting J-Cup Ireland 2024 and conclude with the IRC European Championships 2024 from 10th to 15th September.

After weeks of speculation on which Dun Laoghaire club was hosting the IRC Europeans, RIYC Sailing Manager Mark McGibney confirmed the three keelboat fixtures on Friday.  

The arrangement moves the ICRA National Championships back one week from what was initially announced for 2024.

2024 will be the second Irish hosting of the IRC Euros, the inaugural championship was raced as part of  Cork Week in 2016.

Further information on each event will be released in the coming days. 

Royal Irish Yacht Club Keelboat Events 2024

  • August 30th – September 1st – ICRA 2024
  • September 7th – September 8th - Key Yachting J-Cup Ireland 2024
  • September 10th – 15th – September IRC European Championships 2024
Published in Royal Irish Yacht Club
Tagged under

Pierrik Devic from the Yacht Club of Monaco was the overall winner of the International Yacht Club Challenge (IYCC) hosted by the Royal Irish Yacht Club on Dublin Bay over the weekend.

With five race wins from seven races sailed, Devic was decent points clear of Honza Krejcirik of Lodni Sporty Brno Yacht Club of the Czech Republic on 14 points.

Galway's Enda O'Coineen represented the 'Royal Arrecife Yacht Club' and was third on 15 points. 

The International Yacht Club Challenge is an invitational event organised as an amateur regatta between yacht club members. Its purpose is to generate 'international goodwill through friendly competition'.

The last IYCC, raced on the Hudson off Manhattan in J24s in 1988, but the 2023 event was staged in J80 keelboats supplied by Kenny Rumball of the Irish National Sailing School.

Summary of Participating Clubs: 

• Royal Irish YC, Jerry Dowling
• Royal Cork YC, Kieran O Connell
• USA Manhattan YC, Jay Parekh
• SPAIN (RCNA) Royal Areciffe YC, Manolo Torres
• St BARTS Gustavia YC, Brett Durrans / Margarita Profyri
• Royal Galway YC, Joan Mulloy / Miguel Lasso
• CZECHIA Lodni Sporty Brno YC, Honza Krejcirik
• MONACO YC, Pierrik Devic

Results below: 

Published in Royal Irish Yacht Club
Tagged under

Thirty entries from all over Ireland kicked off the RS Feva circuit hosted by Royal Irish Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire at the weekend.

Sailors from Mullochmore, Ballyholme, Howth and Greystones competed alongside Dun Laoghaire entrants in light and variable conditions, which freshened up to close on 20knts on the second day of racing.

Race Officer Michael Tyrrell delivered a six-race championship, with many competitors racing in tricky Dublin Bay conditions for the first time.

Three fleets battled it out for podium positions in each fleet, and there were additional prizes for best newcomer, furthest travelled, and resilience on the water.

Emily and her sister Annabel Ridout from Ballyholme led the gold fleet with five first places and a second. The second prize went to Jules Start and Grace Gavan from RSGYC and the third prize to Jessica Dudley Young and Sally Nixon, also from Ballyholme.

“Great competition, camaraderie and across all fleets!” commented Class Captain David Whelan of NYC.

Heather Wright revealed the new RS Ireland brand and generously contributed loads of prizes and quality merchandise, including McWilliam sailing bags and an RS Feva Racing Jib, which was raffled raising over €300 for the RNLI.

Download results below

Next stop RS Nationals at RS Fest in Blessington on June 24th and 25th.

Published in Royal Irish Yacht Club

The long trail from Ballyholme to the Royal Irish Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire for the RS Feva East Coast Championships was worthwhile for the three crews from the North who dominated the result sheet, with the Ridout family taking first and second places, and Jessica Dadley-Young and Sally Nixon coming fourth.

The RIYC hosted event on 6th and 7th May and enjoyed near-perfect conditions with plenty of sunshine and wind to go with it. The fleet had 28 starters from all over Ireland.

Emily and Annabel Ridout (BYC) led most of the six races with confidence and flair, keeping ahead of the main fleet. With five first places and a second they comfortably took the Gold Fleet first prize. The girls’ father, Matthew and brother Peter also competed as a Parent/Child team and were pushed very hard by the excellent Irish teams, achieving a final overall ranking of second place.

A race start for the RS Fevas at the Eastern Championships on Dublin Bay Photo: RIYCA race start for the RS Fevas at the Eastern Championships on Dublin Bay Photo: RIYC

Jessica Dadley-Young and Sally Nixon also from Ballyholme, also kept pace with the front runners of the fleet. Their best race place, third, was achieved whilst struggling with a broken tiller extension. Their determination was rewarded with third place in the Gold Fleet.

This double-handed dinghy fleet with asymmetric spinnaker at Ballyholme has grown to eight privately owned, with three club boats for hire.

Ballyholme competitors (from left to right) Jessica Dadley, Annabel, Mat and Peter Ridout, Sally Nixon and Emily Ridout Photo: Mat RidoutBallyholme competitors (from left to right) Jessica Dadley, Annabel, Mat and Peter Ridout, Sally Nixon and Emily Ridout Photo: Mat Ridout

Mat Ridout praised the Club organisation. “The event was brilliantly organised and efficiently run, and like all RS Feva events, great fun for young sailors from 8-18 years old”.

And at the end of May, the trip for the Ballyholme crews to the Welsh National Sailing Centre at Plas Heli at Pwllheli for the RS Feva Nationals will be even longer. Joining them in the fleet numbering at this point over 90, will be Ross and Ellie Nolan from Royal North of Ireland YC on Belfast Lough and Rose Kelly and Kate Jennings from East Down YC on Strangford Lough. Later, at least the Dadley-Young/Nixon crew will compete in the RS Feva Northerns at East Down YC.

Download overall results as a jpeg below

Published in Royal Irish Yacht Club
Tagged under
Page 1 of 17

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Associations

ISA sidebutton
ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating