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Displaying items by tag: Shannon Navigation

Following the pre-Christmas warning over an off-station marker on the Shannon Navigation, Waterways Ireland advises that a temporary red marker has now been installed in the relevant area north of Athlone.

The temporary marker is in place of the port-hand lateral marker on the south side of Inchmore Island on Lough Ree.

Masters of Vessels should proceed with additional caution in the vicinity of the island, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels and waterway users the Shannon Navigation at Lough Ree that a port hand lateral marker on the south side of Inchmore Island is currently off station.

Masters of vessels should proceed with additional caution in the vicinity of Inchmore Island north of Athlone until further notice.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels and waterway users on the Shannon Navigation that the Head of the Shannon rowing event will take place in Carrick-on-Shannon this Saturday 3 December.

The event will take place downstream of Carrick bridge for a distance of 3.5km. The rowing starts at navigation maker known locally as White Woman/White Lady downstream of Carrick-on-Shannon and will proceed back to the Marina just downstream of the bridge.

The rowing events will take place between 10am and 4pm. Masters of vessels are requested to proceed with additional caution in the vicinity of the rowing events during these times.

This event is the second Head of the Shannon of 2022, as last year’s event was postponed until February. Details for competing rowers can be found HERE.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels and waterway users on the Shannon Navigation that the upgrade works on the waiting jetties upstream and downstream of Portumna Bridge will be carried out from Thursday 17 November to Friday 2 December.

These jetties will remain open except for the area where works are ongoing. The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says it regrets any inconvenience that this may cause and thanks its customers for their cooperation in relation to this matter.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels and water users that the Shannon Navigation, Erne System, Barrow Navigation and Northern Ireland’s River Bann are currently experiencing high water levels which are expected to continue to rise.

All users of these inland waterways should proceed with additional caution and bear the following in mind:

  • Air draft is reduced under all bridges and power lines.
  • Water velocity is significantly increased.
  • Access to jetties can be difficult as gangways and pontoons are elevated.
  • Navigation markers, pontoons, jetties may be submerged.
  • Mooring lines should checked regularly if it safe to do so.
Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels and waterway users on the Shannon Navigation that the waiting jetties at the Railway Bridge in Limerick will be relocated to Georges Quay from Saturday 29 October.

These jetties will be reinstated to their original location in March 2023, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels and waterway users on the Shannon Navigation that jetty upgrade works at Coosan Point on Lough Ree are under way as of Tuesday 25 October.

Originally set to continue to next Wednesday 2 November, the works were completed ahead of schedule on Friday 28 October.

The jetty lights that were turned off to facilitate these works have now operating again, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways confirmed.

Elsewhere, re-decking of the floating jetties in Dromineer on Lough Derg will commence on Tuesday 1 November.

Security fencing will be erected around the front of the gangway to restrict access onto the floating jetties for the duration of the works, which are expected to take around six weeks to complete.

This story was updated on Friday 28 October to note the early completion of works at Coosan Point.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland wishes to inform masters of vessels and waterway users on the Shannon Navigation that Clarendon Lock in Co Roscommon will be closed from Tuesday 1 November 2022 for three months to facilitate the replacement of the upstream lock gates. Passage of the lock will not be possible until February 2023 at the earliest.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on the Shannon Navigation and Shannon-Erne Waterway that the winter mooring period for public harbours on these navigations will commence on Tuesday 1 November.

Masters wishing to avail of winter mooring — which continues until 31 March 2023 — are required to register online and pay the winter mooring fee of €63.50 prior to 1 November.

Masters must apply for winter mooring at a specific harbour. They will then receive by email their approval, rejection or an alternative location of application. Upon approval, follow the link in the email to pay the required fee online.

Masters are reminded that Bye-law 17 of the Canals Act — the “5 consecutive days/ 7 days in one month rule” — continues to apply for those not availing of winter mooring.

Waterways Ireland says it will be disconnecting its electricity supply points and water supply at public moorings for the winter period. Both services will be reinstated prior to the commencement of the 2023 boating season, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Owners are urged to note that vessels are moored in public harbours at the owners risk at all times and may be directed to other harbours “as operational exigencies require”.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels and users on the Shannon Navigation that the Coosan Point jetties on Lough Ree will be closed from Monday 3 to Thursday 6 October for improvement works.

Published in Inland Waterways
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Marine Science Perhaps it is the work of the Irish research vessel RV Celtic Explorer out in the Atlantic Ocean that best highlights the essential nature of marine research, development and sustainable management, through which Ireland is developing a strong and well-deserved reputation as an emerging centre of excellence. From Wavebob Ocean energy technology to aquaculture to weather buoys and oil exploration these pages document the work of Irish marine science and how Irish scientists have secured prominent roles in many European and international marine science bodies.

 

At A Glance – Ocean Facts

  • 71% of the earth’s surface is covered by the ocean
  • The ocean is responsible for the water cycle, which affects our weather
  • The ocean absorbs 30% of the carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by human activity
  • The real map of Ireland has a seabed territory ten times the size of its land area
  • The ocean is the support system of our planet.
  • Over half of the oxygen we breathe was produced in the ocean
  • The global market for seaweed is valued at approximately €5.4 billion
  • · Coral reefs are among the oldest ecosystems in the world — at 230 million years
  • 1.9 million people live within 5km of the coast in Ireland
  • Ocean waters hold nearly 20 million tons of gold. If we could mine all of the gold from the ocean, we would have enough to give every person on earth 9lbs of the precious metal!
  • Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector in the world – Ireland is ranked 7th largest aquaculture producer in the EU
  • The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest ocean in the world, covering 20% of the earth’s surface. Out of all the oceans, the Atlantic Ocean is the saltiest
  • The Pacific Ocean is the largest ocean in the world. It’s bigger than all the continents put together
  • Ireland is surrounded by some of the most productive fishing grounds in Europe, with Irish commercial fish landings worth around €200 million annually
  • 97% of the earth’s water is in the ocean
  • The ocean provides the greatest amount of the world’s protein consumed by humans
  • Plastic affects 700 species in the oceans from plankton to whales.
  • Only 10% of the oceans have been explored.
  • 8 million tonnes of plastic enter the ocean each year, equal to dumping a garbage truck of plastic into the ocean every minute.
  • 12 humans have walked on the moon but only 3 humans have been to the deepest part of the ocean.

(Ref: Marine Institute)

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