Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: dmyc

Andrew Algeo's J109 Juggerknot continues its winning run this season adding the DMYC 'King of the Bay' title to last weekend's Howth Yacht Club Wave Regatta triumph in Class One IRC.

Dawn broke, and the club web camera showed a sea as smooth as glass. Dublin Bay Buoy reported 1 knot, gusting 2. Would the forecast come true? Windy.com was reporting a possibility of as high as 9 knots, easterly. Race officers, RIB crews, timekeepers, shore support – all volunteers – started rolling into the club at 9 am; there was a promise of breakfast to get everyone into the clubhouse for a pre-regatta briefing. As the first gun time approached, the wind started to lift, and various weather stations agreed that the wind was matching what was forecast – somewhere in the east, and touching up around 8 knots. Racing would proceed on schedule, under blue skies and bright sunshine, with an ebbing tide.

King of the bayJoggerknot crew Ruth Hite and Paul Nolan are presented with the King of the Bay prize at the DMYC

In Class A, first place went to Andrew Algeo’s “Juggerknot” (J/109), storming home – as much as one can storm in 9 knots of wind – with a corrected time of 2:20:41. Richard Goodbody’s “White Mischief” (J/109) came second, 12 minutes behind Juggerknot, and Frank Whelan in “Eleuthra” (Grand Soleil 44 race) placed 3rd on corrected time.

In Class B, Daly Melvin’s “Ceol Na Mara” (Hunter Sonata) placed first, followed by David Meeke’s “Alias” (Ruffian 23) in second, and Fergus Mason’s “Viking” (Shipman) in third.

In Class C, Justin Burke’s “alertpackaging.com” (SB20) took first place, Declan Curtin in “Jester” (J/80) placed second, and David William’s “Phantom” (Dragon) was third.

For the dinghy pursuit race, Simon Revill in “Dubious” (IDRA14) was first, Frank Hamilton was second in “Dunmoanin” (IDRA14), and Alan Carr placed third in “Starfish” (IDRA14). In the second race, “Dubious” was first, “Starfish” was second, and John Fitzgerald in “Doody” (IDRA14) placed third.

The race committee chose the Royal Irish yacht Juggerknot as the 'King of the Bay'. An on-the-day entrant, they attributed their win to having a Code Zero on board and having the perfect conditions to fly it for several miles of the race.

Full results are available here.

The DMYC would like to thank all volunteers and staff who made the day possible and Dublin Bay Sailing Club for the use of the hut on the West Pier.

Published in DMYC
Tagged under

During the latter half of last week few would have expected that by Sunday it would be “warm” enough to permit racing in Dun Laoghaire Harbour for the Frostbite Series hosted by Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club. While the “Beast from the East” and Storm Emma wreaked havoc in Irish (and UK) airspace from Wednesday through Friday, dumping inordinate amounts of snow on us all, the thought of “sailing on Sunday” must have been far removed from everyone’s mind. 

However, by Saturday the thaw had set in and by Sunday the temperature had gone up a notch or two to make racing semi-attractive from a shore-side perspective. Race Officer, Cormac Bradley, in consultation with Frostbites Co-ordinators Neil Colin and Olivier Prouveur decided that the challenge for the day was to get a race in and the fleet ashore promptly! In that regard a decision (in principle) to have a triangular course of three laps was taken before the committee boat left the pontoon at the DMYC.

A steady wind out of the East made the setting of the weather mark a relatively easy task. The committee boat anchored just beyond the exit from the marina which allowed a beat the length of the harbour to be set.  A gybe mark was set about 60m inside the harbour mouth but midway between the ends of the two piers while the leeward mark was about twenty metres off the transom of the committee boat. The ambition was to have two off-wind spinnaker legs but the normal guinea-pig for that test spent a large part of the pre-race period undoing wine-glass knots in their red spinnaker, leaving the acid test of spinnaker flying on the top reach to the RS400 of Niels Warburton and Peter Doherty. The appropriateness of the spinnaker leg was confirmed by radio via the gybe mark boat.

The Slow PY Fleet had nine starters – two KONA Windsurfers, the Enterprise, the Wayfarer, with a replacement helm, Norman Lee, the IDRA of Pierre Long, the Feva XL of Conor Galligan, the Hartley 12.2 of Odhran Prouveur and two Laser Vago XDs and in a very conservative start all nine went left initially before spreading themselves across the width of the course. The IDRA 14 of Pierre Long and John Parker led around the first weather mark and flew spinnaker. Behind them the red- sailed Kona of Robbie Walker and the Wayfarer followed. The IDRA led to the gybe mark but surprisingly dropped spinnaker which allowed the Wayfarer to close the gap. Up the second beat the Wayfarer took the lead which it held to the finish, recording a race time of 29:58. In 2nd place, forty-four seconds later, was Walker in the first KONA, followed by his class-mate, Des Gibney, forty-nine seconds later, with the IDRA next, forty-one seconds behind. However, on handicap they were all outdone by the junior crew in the Feva XL, with Conor Galligan helming, who converted a race time of 33:18 into a handicap time of 26:51 and a 21-second winning margin over the Wayfarer.

The biggest fleet of the day were the Lasers with 13 boats on the water. Their start was more competitive than the Slow PYs but was still a clean start and again they all resolved to go left initially. However, they too spread themselves across the course going upwind and rounded the top mark with regularity to provide a well spread-out fleet with no single boat very far ahead or very far behind. At the close of the first lap, the lead was held by Chris Arrowsmith (201829) with Gavin Murphy (173062) about a boat-length off his transom. Sean Flanagan (177854) was in close proximity, waiting to pounce on any mistakes by the front two. In contrast to the Slow PY fleet the Lasers approached the leeward mark on a much higher line to windward before ducking off to leeward to round the mark. On the second lap, Murphy had moved into the lead with Arrowsmith the chasing boat.  The finishing order was Murphy (30:37), Arrowsmith (30:56), Flanagan (31:30), Coakley (31:32), O’Leary (31:53) and Ella Hemeryck (Rad) (31:54), but on corrected time the sequence changed to Murphy (27:55), Hemeryck (28:00), Arrowsmith (28:12), Shirley Gilmore (Rad) (28:32) and Flanagan (28:43).

Four fast PY boats took to the start – three Fireballs and the RS400. While it may have been the smallest start it was the most competitive in terms of the clock counting down. Yet again Noel Butler & Marie Barry (15061) had an easy race, leading from start to finish, but the other two boats, Frank Miller & Grattan Donnelly (14713) and Louise McKenna & Hermine O’Keeffe (14691) had a race all the way round the course. Indeed, the position of “chasing Fireball” changed a number of times during the race. At the end of the first lap it was Miller & Donnelly, who had been relegated to third on the water, but by the time they were rounding the leeward mark for the second time, negotiating their way around Lasers, Miller & Donnelly had gone into the “chase boat” position. They retained that positon for the finish, but only by a margin of 15 seconds.  While the official results had the result the other way round, I heard Miller claiming afterwards that he and Donnelly had finished second……..the ladies didn’t appear to be challenging that assertion. The favourable spinnaker legs – spinnakers were flown on both reaches with the two chasing Fireballs going to windward of the committee boat on the second lap en route to the leeward mark –allowed a Fireball to take the fastest corrected time. That honour went to Butler & Barry by a margin of 14 seconds.

While the race had started in misty conditions and a cool enough temperature, once the mist lifted there was a sense that it got a bit “warmer” and the committee boat contemplated a second race. However, as no-one seemed to be unhappy at the lack of a signal for a second race, and one prominent helm indicated that he wasn’t unhappy with just a single race after crossing the finish line, it seems that an early departure from the race area was a welcome call. Indeed, only one partially “bare-legged” Laser helm had suggested at the start of the afternoon that two races should be sailed!

DMYC Frostbites – 4th March 2018

Series 2

Elapsed

Time

Corrected

Time

 

Slow PY

     

1

Conor Galligan & crew

Feva XL

33:18

26:51

2

Norman Lee & Miriam McCarthy

Wayfarer

29:58

27:12

3

Pierre Long & John Parker

IDRA 14

32:12

28:22

 

Lasers

     

1

Gavin Murphy

Laser

30:37

27:55

2

Ella Hemeryck

Radial

31:54

28:00

3

Chris Arrowsmith

Laser

30:56

28:12

 

Fast PY

     

1

Noel Butler & Marie Barry

15061

25:32

26:37

2

Frank Miller & Grattan Donnelly

14713

28:43

29:57

3

Louise McKenna & Hermine O’Keeffe

14691

28:58

30:12

The Mug winners on the day were Odhran Prouveur & Helen Sheehy in the Hartley 12.2 in the Slow PY Fleet and Evan Dargan Hayes in a Laser 4.7 in the Laser fleet. Frostbiters are again reminded that there will be racing, weather permitting on Sunday 18th March; the day after St Patrick’s Day.

Published in DMYC
Tagged under

After the zephyrs of last week, the breeze was back yesterday for the DMYC Frostbites and another fleet of 26 boats made the effort to get out and enjoy a brisk afternoon on the water. The wind was projected to be from the SSE with wind strength of 12 – 17 knots and that was how it appeared on the water. However, as we were rigging there was a great deal of whistling through the rigging! A five lap trapezoid curse was sailed under a sunny sky but a coolish air temperature. The beat traversed the harbour with a weather mark up towards the East pier and Marks 2 & 3 in the vicinity of the harbour mouth. Mark 4 was in the vicinity of the Block House on the West Pier.

Ten boats were on the start line for the Slow PYs with both KONA Windsurfers back in action. They managed to foul each other with both their skippers taking an early swim just off the start line. The majority of their fleet went left towards the harbour mouth with the exception of Pierre Long and John Parker (IDRA 14) who very early on were ploughing a solitary furrow up the right-hand side of the beat. This appeared to stand them in good stead as when the balance of the fleet came across to that side of the course, led by the Wayfarer of Monica Schaeffer and Miriam McCarthy, the Wayfarer tacked underneath the IDRA into a leeward slot. The IDRA led the Slow PY Fleet around the weather mark chased by the Wayfarer and the Enterprise of Aidan Geraghty & Eilis O’Driscoll. Thereafter this correspondent lost the action as he has his own hands full racing a Fireball. However, in terms of finishing order the sequence was Wayfarer, KONA 2677 (Des Gibney), IDRA (Long & Parker), Enterprise (Geraghty & O’Driscoll) KONA 1989 (Robbie Walker) and the RS Feva XL of Conor Galligan. Schaeffer’s winning margin on the water of 2½ minutes was enough to hold onto first place on handicap, with the Feva going to second and the IDRA third.

Ten Lasers were on the start line with some single-handers returning from ski breaks in Europe. Others had the ambition of just trying to be ranked as a finisher in terms of the starting procedure having been ruled OCS for the past two Sundays. Interestingly, the banter in the changing room of the Royal St George after the racing was he number of capsizes that had been recorded in the race with at least one Laser helm owning up to two capsizes on the water. Conor O’Leary, back from a week on the white stuff, led the fleet home by 59 seconds from Mark Coakley who was followed home by Sean Flanagan, Chris Arrowsmith, Gavin Murphy, Shirley Gilmore (Radial), Michael Delaney and Hamish Munro. With a better PY for the Radial, Shirley Gilmore leapfrogged three places to record a third on handicap behind O’Leary and Coakley.

Tom Murphy in his K1 was the odd-man-out in the Fast PY as he was the only one not sailing a Fireball. Five Fireballs made the star and four of them went left towards the harbour mouth off the start line. Having watched the IDRA of Long & Parker steal a march in the Slow PY by going left, this correspondent persuaded his helm, Louise McKenna, to go right as well. She did and while they weren’t too far off the pace with the other four boats crossed them two-thirds of the way up the first beat that was as close as they got to them. When the four Fireballs crossed from left to right across the course, Frank Miller & Ed Butler (14713) were the furthest to windward and when they reached the starboard lay-line and tacked for the weather mark, they found themselves leading the fleet. However, by their own admission, post-race, they sailed the first reach of the trapezoid too deep and two of the chasing pack went over them – Noel Butler & Marie Barry (15061) and Alistair Court & Gordon Syme (14706) went in to first and second respectively. Behind them, Neil Colin and Margaret Casey (14775) stayed ahead of McKenna & Bradley (14691). And on a day when Butler & Barry only needed a sniff of the lead they proceeded to romp away from the rest of the fleet, eventually winning by a 1:35 margin though it looked a lot more comfortable distance-wise on the water. Miller & Butler finished second passing Court & Syme when they went opposite ways on one of the subsequent beats. Despite the stiff breeze, spinnakers were flown on all the legs where they should have been. The wind direction was such that all the Fireballs sailed past Mark 2 to put in a gybe at Mark 3 for a tight reach under three sails to Mark 4. All the Fireballs saved their time on the K1 to give a finishing order of Butler & Barry, Miller & Butler, Court & Syme, Colin & Casey and McKenna & Bradley.

Across the whole fleet, the first two Fireballs took the fastest races time on corrected time, followed by the Wayfarer, another Fireball and the Laser of Conor O’Leary.

With six races completed the results are as follows;

7th January

McCarty (Solo)

Schaeffer (Wayfarer)

Gibney (KONA)

Hamilton (IDRA)

Russell (Laser Vago)

Flanagan

Gilmore (Rad)

Hodgins

Dargan Hayes

Hughes

Court (FB)

Ryan (470)

McKenna (FB)

Murphy (K1)

Warburton (RS400)

14th January

Mc Carthy

Galligan (RS Feva XL)

Schaeffer

Walker (KONA)

Hamilton

Geoghegan

Flanagan

Hodgins

Murphy

Gilmore

Butler (FB)

Court

Sheehy (Finn)

Colin (FB)

McKenna

4th February

Race 1

Schaeffer

Long (IDRA)

Hamilton

Geraghty (Enterprise)

Walker

Gilmore

Coakley

Geoghegan

Hodgins

Flanagan

Sheehy

Butler

Colin

Court

Miller

4th February

Race 2

Hamilton

Schaeffer

Walker

Geraghty

Galligan

Hemeryck (Rad)

Dillon

Coakley

O’Leary

Hodgins

Sheehy

Butler

Court

Miller

Colin

18th February

Long

Geraghty

Schaeffer

O’Farrell (Laser Vago)

Hamilton

Arrowsmith

Hughes

Dillon

Coakley

Hodgins

Butler

Sheehy

Miller

McKenna

Ryan

25th February

Schaeffer

Galligan

Long

Gibney

Geraghty

O’Leary

Coakley

Gilmore

Flanagan

Arrowsmith

Butler

Miller

Court

Colin

McKenna

 

Frostbites Director, Neil Colin announced at the prize-giving that there would be racing on Sunday 18th March, the day after St Patrick’s Day.

Published in DMYC
Tagged under

All the weather forecasts were suggesting that there should have been wind for yesterday’s Frostbites in Dun Laoghaire Harbour! XCWeather was projecting 7 – 12 knots of SSW, the Dun Laoghaire Harbour Weather station was showing 6.6 – 10 knots from 163˚ and even worse, the Dublin Bay buoy was showing 13 – 16 knots with a wind direction of 167˚. However, in the inner reaches of the harbour it was a lot less exciting. The “low rains” reference is to describe a drizzly afternoon where it was damp but it never actually rained while we were on the water.

A declaration to the rib crews and committee boat team by Race Officer Cormac Bradley that we would try for two races, given last week’s postponement, seemed optimistic but everyone agreed that it was the thing to do.  

On arrival at the start area, the wind was blowing a healthy 4 knots and was reasonably steady in direction. With the committee boat situated off the block house towards the end of the West Pier, the windward leg initially looked like it could extent the full length of the harbour with the weather mark in the location of the bandstand on the East Pier. With the light wind, which was to get lighter, a triangular course of 3 laps was set with the intention of shortening if the wind didn’t play ball. A late alteration to the weather mark saw it go northwards and a short postponement was flown to allow the stragglers a bit more time to get to the start area.

Twenty-six boats were registered as starters, with ten each in the Slow PY and Laser Classes and six in the Fast PY Class. Notable absentees were the two KONA Windsurfers, maybe deciding that there wasn’t enough wind to warrant getting their feet wet and the Solo of Shane McCarthy, though he was spotted afterwards from a distance with his boat in the carpark at the Coal Harbour, either returning from or packing up to go to a regatta.

In the Slow PY Class, the performance of the day went to Pierre Long & John Parker in the IDRA who got into “breeze” off the start line and waltzed away with the race. By the time they rounded the leeward mark, the chasing pack in Slow PY were in the vicinity of the gybe mark, or just past it. Round the weather mark the sequence in Slow PY was the Enterprise of Aidan Geraghty & Eilis O’Donnell, the Wayfarer of Monica Schaeffer & Miriam McCarthy and the second IDRA of Frank Hamilton & crew. The Laser Vagos were also well up the pecking order. However, the leading Fireball in Fast PY was already in the company of the Wayfarer and the Enterprise.

In the Lasers, a 2018 Frostbite debutant led the way off a cluttered start with one boat being “pinged” for an OCS. While he returned to the right side of the course, he did so by dipping the line rather than going round the ends, so would sail the balance of the race in vain. Having established that he could retrospectively pay an entry fee, Chris Arrowsmith found that the premium for a retrospective entry grew as he crossed the line first and then qualified for the Frostbite Mug for the Laser Class.

Three Fireballs, a Finn a 470, a RS400 and a K1 made up the Fast PY fleet. Frank Miller & Ed Butler (14713) started at the pin end on port and headed to the right hand side of the course. Noel Butler & Marie Barry (15061) and the “pink ladies” Louise McKenna & Hermine O’Keeffe (14691) both started on starboard close to the committee boat but Butler went right initially. His final approach saw him coming into the weather mark on the port lay-line and he appeared to be enjoying a healthy lead. By now the conditions had gone light with wind strength down to 2.2 – 2.5 knots. The top reach “held its shape” by allowing the spinnaker boats to fly bags, but the second reach saw a much more varied approach to getting to the leeward mark. For example, Butler & Barry were tight reaching into the middle of the course on port tack before they gybed to get down to the leeward mark.

With Long & Parker (IDRA) just rounded the leeward mark and with the wind Gods deciding we weren’t going to get anything more, the decision was taken to shorten course at the weather mark. The committee boat upped anchor and relocated itself in time to allow Long & Parker (IDRA) a very VERY comfortable win on the water. The second boat home was the Fireball of Butler & Barry (15061) with Chris Arrowsmith the first Laser.

The ambition to have a second race evaporated in the millpond like environment of the harbour and the consensus afterwards appeared to be that the right call had been made – a race had been achieved.   The fastest race time on corrected time went to the IDRA of Pierre Long and John Parker.

DMYC Frostbites – 18th February 2018

Slow PY

 

1

Pierre Long & John Parker

IDRA

 

2

Aidan Geraghty & Eilis O’Donnell

Enterprise

 

3

Monica Schaeffer & Miriam McCarthy

Wayfarer

Lasers

 

1

Chris Arrowsmith

Laser

 

2

Brendan Hughes

Laser Radial

 

3

Luke Dillon

Laser

Fast PY

 

1

Noel Butler & Marie Barry

Fireball

 

2

Hugh Sheehy

Finn

 

3

Frank Miller & Ed Butler

Fireball

The Fast PY Mug went to Tom Murphy in the K1 but the Mug for the Slow PY was withheld pending the provision of a PY Number for a single-handed Laser Vago. The Vagos of “Sailing in Dublin” are a stalwart element of the Frostbite Series and in recent weeks a number have been sailed single-handed. Another competitor brought this to the attention of the race committee yesterday so the class has been asked to provide the relevant PY Number so that the results can be reviewed.

Given the number of postponements we have had this year, yesterday was a bonus. It wasn’t a thriller, but everyone who wanted a race got a race………..with the exception of one retiree who obviously had too much excitement for the day!

Published in DMYC
Tagged under

After two Sundays of excessive wind, the wind gods looked more favourably on the Frostbites in Dun Laoghaire Harbour and allowed two races to be sailed. However, the waterscape at the DMYC end of the harbour did not lend itself to the idea that racing would be possible – on arrival it was mirror flat. Fortunately, the Race Officer for the day, Cormac Bradley, had checked the main body of the harbour and was able to see two 1720s sailing well in the vicinity of the Carlisle Pier, before he got to the DMYC. That allowed him to speculate as to the possibility of having two races, a view endorsed by Frostbites Director, Neil Colin.

The race team departed the shore with a view to seeing what was possible and were greeted with a light wind coming out of the eastern quadrant of the compass. From a position in the roads of the marina approach, the wind was initially coming off the Boyd Memorial on the East Pier, and then went further left to the weather station on the upper walkway of the pier. A median position between the two seemed to be the safe bet!  The balance of the triangular course was set leaving the ribs free to help get the fleet out to the start area. While this was underway the wind went right to the extent that the weather mark had to be re-set.

Thirty-one boats came under starter’s order for the first race, 3 laps of a triangular course with a weather mark set beyond and outside the ferry gantry, a gybe mark in the middle of the harbour and a leeward mark just outside the entrance to the marina.

In Slow PY, eleven boats took part with the early action on the water being between the Wayfarer, the IDRA of Pierre Long and John Parker and the KONA of Robbie Walker.  Frank Hamilton & Jenny in the second IDRA and Aidan Geraghty & Eilis O’Driscoll had a separate race. While both off-wind legs were spinnaker legs, the wind strength wasn’t overly strong and the KONAs struggled in the lighter stuff. As the race progressed the Wayfarer of Monica Schaeffer & Miriam McCarthy eked out a comfortable lead having a 1:43 lead at the finish with the IDRA of Pierre Long coming home second. The second IDRA came home six seconds under three minutes behind Long with the Enterprise and the first KONA of Walker separating the two IDRAS.  On corrected time, the wayfarer took the wind by 29 seconds with the IDRAS second and third.

In the Lasers, Shirley Gilmore (Rad) set the early pace and led the fleet round the first lap, however, by the finish she had been overhauled by debutant Mark Coakley (Full, 201888) who took the win by thirty-four seconds. In third was the full rig of Justin Geoghegan (Full, 165512), just thirty-five seconds behind Gilmore and only ten seconds ahead of Alan Hodgins (Full, 175809). On handicap, Gilmore took the win, followed by Coakley, Geoghegan, Hodgins and Sean Flanagan (Full, 177854).  The Lasers had a close race with nobody breaking significantly away.

The seven-boat Fast PY fleet saw a Frostbite debut for Fireball 15007, sailed by Dave Coleman and Glen Fisher as part of the 5-boat Fireball contribution to this fleet, the odd-ones-out being the Finn of Hugh Sheehy and the RS 400 of Neils Warburton. Frank Miller & Grattan Donnelly (14713) led the fleet around the first lap but with the exception of the debutants the Fireballs kept close company around the course.  Thus, while Miller led, Noel Butler & Marie Barry (15061) and Neil Colin & Margaret Casey (14775) were in very close company and Alistair Court & Gordon Syme (14706) were probably of the order of a boat length and a half off them.   At the end of the first lap, my recall is that Miller and Butler went left almost immediately while Colin went right. And while Butler would claim afterwards that he gained whether he went left or right, at different times, and I don’t dispute that, the consequence of going right was that Colin & Casey came out on top at the second weather mark. However, they had no sense of comfort as Miller and Butler were breathing down their necks. Court couldn’t quite close the gap on the boats ahead of him. Butler & Barry were shut out of leading the fleet until the very end of the race when the Enterprise of the Slow PY fleet entered the fray of rounding the leeward mark. There is no suggestion that the Enterprise shouldn’t have been there or did anything wrong, but as the second Fireball on the water, behind Colin and the Enterprise, Butler was able to execute a more efficient rounding and with a short hitch to the finish was able to take the lead of the race when it mattered most – just before the finish line. He beat Colin home by 18 seconds with only 1½ minutes need to finish the first four Fireballs. Despite the fact that the Finn came in five seconds short of three minutes behind the first Fireball his corrected time gave him a win by 19 seconds over Butler, Colin and Court with Miller in fifth.

As an additional feature of the results, the team gave the list of fastest elapsed times on the water, corrected to reflect the three different start times.

In Race 1 the order of fastest corrected race times is as follows;

Crew

Class

Elapsed time

Corrected Time

Monica Schaeffer & Miriam McCarthy

Wayfarer

38:47

35:12

Pierre Long & John Parker

IDRA 14

40:30

35:41

Shirley Gilmore

Laser Radial

41:00

36:00

Mark Coakley

Laser

40:26

36:51

Hugh Sheehy

Finn

39:10

37:29

Noel Butler & Marie Barry

Fireball

36:15

37:48

Given that the last two Sundays were blown out and as there was still enough wind, and sunshine, to have a second race, a windward-leeward course was signalled. Again, there was some fickleness to the breeze in terms of direction, but just before the Race Officer resigned himself from having to move station, the wind settled in to a changed windward mark position.

Again three laps were signalled. In the PY fleet the greyhounds again were the Wayfarer of Schaeffer & McCarthy, the IDRA of Long & Parker, the KONA of Walker and the IDRA of Hamilton & Jenny. Schaeffer & McCarthy and Long & Parker worked their way clear of the fleet and Long stayed ahead for the latter half of the race.  However, despite having a good lead on the water as he sailed down the last leeward leg, he sailed through the finish line with the committee boat flying its blue flag to indicate that it was on station for a finish. Moments later, as Schaeffer passed outside the committee boat, she made it clear that she would be protesting Long for his transgression……….he subsequently retired.

The Lasers meantime decided they would have their indiscretions on the start line with an X-flag being flown at their start. Not all the transgressors returned which meant that they were met with silence when they crossed the finish line. Despite the light airs and her handicap win of the first race, Shirley Gilmore struggled with this one and left the winning on the water to the full rigs of Luke Dillon (166676), Mark Coakley (201888), Conor O’Leary (190745) with Ella Hemeryck in another Laser Radial (210312) the first lady home in fourth. This was enough to elevate her to the class win by a margin of five seconds.

In the fast PY it was all about gybing angles for the Fireballs on the downwind legs and trying to get into perceived wind veins across the course. In truth I saw little of the intimate action as a consequence of my Race Officer duties so all I can report is that Court and Syme nearly transgressed the rule to not sail through the finish line when the blue flag is flying but avoided the scenario with a crash hardening up around the pin end of the finish line.  Butler & Barry took the race win on the water by 1:37 over Court who had forty seconds on Miller who had eleven seconds on Court. But they were all gazumped by Sheehy who finished among the Fireballs and took the handicap win. 

Sheehy also took the fastest corrected time for Race 2, 33:22, followed by Hemeryck, 33:38, Dillon, 33:43 and Butler/Barry 34:19.

Mug Winners on the day included Dave Coleman and Glen Fisher (R1/Fast PY Fleet), Mark Coakley (R1/Laser) and Ella Hemeryck (R2/Laser Radial)

Published in Dublin Bay
Tagged under

For the second round of Frostbite racing in Series 2, Race Officer Cormac Bradley set the 31-boat fleet a triangular course and with the assistance of one of the competitors tried to make sure that the top reach was able to be sailed as a spinnaker leg! Having watched the weather forecast on XCWeather from the start of the weekend, the wind situation inside the harbour wasn’t quite what was predicted. The forecast was for 14 – 17 knots across the afternoon with guts in the range 20 – 28knots. However, on arriving at the scene the flags inside the Coal Harbour were not suggesting those sorts of strengths. The direction of SSW was in accordance with the forecast.

31 boats took to the water, nearly 25% up on the previous Sunday but still with lots of room for more boats to join in. All the usual suspects were in attendance in the Slow PY Fleet; Shane McCarthy’s Solo, the two KONA windsurfers of Robbie Walker & Des Gibney, a second, club Wayfarer from the DMYC helmed by Dave Colman joined the regulars in Monica Schaeffer & Miriam McCarthy, the Feva of Conor Galligan was out along with Odhran Prouveur & Helen Sheehy in the Hartley 12.2 and Frank Hamilton was the sole IDR14.
Twelve Lasers took to the water with Conor O’Leary making his 2018 debut after missing last week when taking his recreational activities to Europe.

In the Fast PY Fleet there was a 2018 debut for Hugh Sheehy in the Finn, Noel Butler & Marie Barry and Frank Miller & Class Chairman Neil Cramer and the Keegans, David & Michael in the Fireball Class and a total turnout of ten boats.

fireball DMYCTop reach action between two Fireball dinghies Photo: Bob Hobby/DMYC Facebook

With the committee boats situated just to the West of the harbour entrance, the beat was to a mark in the approaches to the marina and a gybe mark that was to the east of the former docking facility of the high speed ferry but towards the middle of the harbour. Amazingly for the first couple of rounds, the wind appeared to be reasonably steady at 190˚.
Off the start line, the trend across all three fleets was to start on starboard and work one’s way to the left-hand side of the beat before taking a long port tack into the mark. In this respect, the Solo led the Slow PY fleet and rounded first followed by the KONA of Walker and the Wayfarer of Schaeffer. These three occupied the first three slots all the way round with the KONA working its way into the lead. The Solo and the Wayfarer had a closer race but the Solo eventually won out but only by a margin of 10 seconds – 39:30 to 39:40 after five laps.

shirley gilmoreShirley Gilmore leads in the Lasers. The NI helmswoman won the DMYC Laser Class mug. Photo: Bob Hobby

In the Laser fleet there were also three boats that were jostling for the podium positions throughout the race – Justin Geoghegan (165512), Sean Flanagan (177854) and Conor O’Leary (190745). Until, that is the final approach to the leeward mark when O’Leary went through the start/finish line and decided that he had to unwind himself. That dropped him to 6th with Geoghegan taking the win, followed home by Flanagan and Alan Hodgins.

The Fast PY fleet had an OCS in the form of Fireball 14706, Alistair Court & Gordon Syme and like the previous starts, the trend was to go left first before working the middle to left of the beat to get to the windward mark. Neil Colin & Margaret Casey (14775) did that to best effect to lead at the weather mark and retained that lead to just before the first leeward mark when taking a more upwind line, Noel Butler & Marie Barry (15061) powered over the top of them to take the lead. They subsequently “walked away” from the fleet, leading by just over a leg and 3:44 at the finish. Behind them, the places seemed to be in a constant state of flux, with Court, Miller & Cramer (14713), the “pink ladies”, Louise & Hermine (14691) changing places all the way round. Court & Syme recovered from their premature start to claim second place on the water followed by Colin & Casey, McKenna & O’Keeffe, Miller & Cramer, the Finn of Sheehy and the 470 of Ryan & McAree.

In Frostbite Mug terms, the Fast PY award went to Niels Warburton in the RS400, to Shirley Gilmore in the Lasers and to the Enterprise of Bernadette Fox & Aidan Geraghty in the Slow PY Fleet.

DMYC Frostbites 2017/18: Series 2
Round 2. 

Slow PY

1 Shane McCarthy (Solo)
2 Conor Galligan (Feva)
3 Monica Schaeffer & Miriam McCarthy (Wayfarer)
4 Robbie Walker (KONA)
5 Frank Hamilton & Crew (IDRA14)

Lasers

1 Justin Geoghegan

2 Sean Flanagan
3 Alan Hodgins
4 Gavan Murphy
5 Shirley Gilmore (Radial)

Fast PY

1 Noel Butler & Marie Barry (Fireball)
2 Alistair Court & Gordon Syme (Fireball)
3 Hugh Sheehy (Finn)
4 Neil Colin & Margaret Casey (Fireball)
5 Louise McKenna & Hermine O’Keeffe (Fireball)

Published in Dublin Bay
Tagged under

DMYC organiers are studying a dip in entries for its annual Frostbite series.

Numbers have dropped significantly from the typical 80 – 90 boats over recent years to 52 this year, 24 of which are Lasers.

Despite best efforts to promote the event, including contacting class captains, contacting dinghy clubs, early publication of the NOR and ease of entry via the web site the decline has been noticeable. 

'It appears to be lifestyle changes, as the morning cruiser (Turkey Shoot) racing is growing in popularity', says the DMYC's Neil Colin.

One suggestion for change has been made by Afloat.ie reader Peter O'Doherty (see comment via Facebook below) who says 'multiple, shorter races with a variety of courses would make the series more attractive. Five laps of a trapezoid can end up being a bit of a procession'.

The DMYC are making a determined push for series two of the winter event that runs until the end of March.

'We're calling all East Coast Dinghy Sailors to use the Frostbites on Sunday afternoons to keep your “hand in” and ensure you “hit the ground running” at the start of the summer season', Colin told Afloat.ie

The DMYC Frostbites Series II, runs from 7th January to 25th March – potentially there are 11 Sundays left, with double race days when the weather and daylight allows.

Racing is for Lasers and PY fleets (incl KONA windsurfers) with the first gun at 13.57 hours each day.

Entry is available on line here or in the club house after racing, entry fees will be discounted by 50%.

Published in DMYC
Tagged under

A modest fleet of 25 boats opened the second half of the 2017/18 Frostbite Series hosted by Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club earlier today, Sunday 7th January writes Cormac Bradley. While XCWeather had a forecast for 14:00 of 11 – 16 knots Easterly with an air temperature of 5˚, the weather station inside the harbour was showing 17.3 knots with a maximum gust of 22 knots at 13:45 with a wind direction of 105˚ and an air temperature of 6.4˚. On leaving the my commentary position to repair to the DMYC clubhouse, the wind strength recording was 16 knots gusting 19knots and considering the number of capsizes, I think that this was the more accurate assessment.

Race Officer Ben Mulligan (Flying Fifteens) set a five-lap trapezoid course for the day’s proceedings with his committee boat stationed just to the east of the entrance to the marina and a weather mark in the middle of the harbour. No.2 was situated in the middle of the harbour mouth but probably of the order of 60m inside the mouth itself, while No.3 was close to the West Pier and No.4 was about 30m to leeward of the committee boat.

Of the 25 boats on the water the breakdown was as follows – 10 Lasers (of assorted rigs), three Laser Vagos, three Fireballs, two IDRAs, a Solo, a Wayfarer, a 470, a K1, a Kona Windsurfer , an RS400 and the Hartley 12.2. 

In the Slow PY Fleet, Shane McCarthy in the Solo led for the majority of the race, losing the lead for a short time to the solitary Kona Windsurfer of Des Gibney. Shane started the race on starboard tack towards the pin but not on it and sailed about half the distance from the pin to the end of the West Pier before working his way up the left-hand side of the beat. The majority of the other Slow PY starters were towards the committee boat end and tacked much earlier to work the opposite side of the beat. For most of them this was as close as they got to McCarthy who led comfortably around the weather mark and proceeded to sail away from the other “Slow PY-ers” with the exception of Gibney. Behind the Solo (5302) the pecking order at the first mark was Monica Schaeffer & Miriam McCarthy in the Wayfarer (11152), Frank Hamilton & crew, Jenny, in the first IDRA (140), Pierre Long & John Parker in the second IDRA (161) and the KONA (2677) of Gibney.  By Mark 4 of the first lap, the KONA has risen to second and Hamilton had passed out Schaeffer. The places behind McCarthy remained in a state of flux with Long passing out Hamilton in the duel of the IDRAs before Hamilton regained that lead and Long retired. The Wayfarer exercised caution on the off-wind legs by not flying the spinnaker and this left Gibney as the sole chaser of the Solo. Downwind he was able to close significantly and indeed on the penultimate lap he actually overtook McCarthy, albeit briefly, before McCarthy pulled away over the last lap to win by 2 minutes and twenty seconds.  In the Slow PY Fleet the day’s Frostbite Mug went to the first Laser Vago, registered to Nigel Russell but sailed by two others. 

The Fireball turnout was very modest at three boats – work robbing the fleet of one boat, hospitalisation and holidays another boat and a possible sixth boat not appearing.  Despite two late arrivals in the starting area, one of the latecomers seem to get the best start with Neil Colin & Margaret Casey (14775) commanding the committee boat end of the line with Alistair Court & Gordon Syme (14706) to leeward and Louise McKenna & Hermine O’Keeffe (14691) astern. All three headed left initially with Colin going over the top of Court and being the first to tack on to port for a long leg up the middle of the course. Court followed shortly thereafter but now occupied the windward berth relative to Colin. They rounded Mark 1 with Court leading by half a boat-length but neither flew spinnaker down the leg to No.2. McKenna had another challenge with the 470 rounding on her transom and for the rest of the afternoon she was unable to get any significant distance away from the Olympic Class boat. Spinnakers broke out from Mark 2 to Mark 3 but Colin dropped at Mark 3 while Court held it for the early part of the leg, but fell off to leeward relative to the mark as the price. For the second beat all the Fireballs stayed right and left the hitch to the windward mark to much later. By this stage Court had opened up his lead on Colin and both were comfortably ahead of McKenna who was having an alternative race with the 470. No spinnakers featured on the top reach of the trapezoid all afternoon and only sporadically on the bottom reach, with Court the only proponent of that exercise.  Court progressively pulled away from Colin who then went swimming on the third lap between 1 and 2 – a squall arriving with not enough kicker released. This prompted an early retirement, leaving the field wide open for Court & Syme. In the Fast PY Fleet the day’s Frostbite Mugs went to Gerry Ryan & John McAree in the 470.

The tightest racing of the day was in the 10-boat Laser Class. While the fleet was led all the way round by Sean Flanagan (177854/Full Rig) he was closely chased by Alan Hodgins (175809/Full Rig) with Shirley Gilmore (204762/Radial) lurking with intent in 3rd place. The “lurking with intent” paid off, for although she was 1:57 down on Sean Flanagan at the finish and 1:16 down on Hodgins, on corrected time she finished just 25 seconds behind Flanagan and 13 seconds ahead of Hodgins who recorded the same corrected time as Evan Dargan Hayes in a Laser 4.7 in fourth. Thus, the first four Lasers on corrected time were covered by 38 seconds.  The Frostbite Mug went to Sean Flanagan.

DMYC Frostbites

2017/18: Series 2

Round 1

Helm & Crew

Class

Sail No.

Slow PY

1

Shane McCarthy

Solo

5302

 

2

Monica Schaeffer & Miriam McCarthy

Wayfarer

11152

3

Des Gibney

KONA

2677

4

Frank Hamilton & Jenny

IDRA

140

5

A.N. Other & A.N. Other

Laser Vago

816

Lasers

1

Sean Flanagan

Laser

177854

 

2

Shirley Gilmore

Laser Radial

204762

3

Alan Hodgins

Laser

175809

4

Evan Dargan Hayes

Laser 4.7

195270

5

Brendan Hughes

Laser Radial

185105

Fast PY

1

Alistair Court & Gordon Syme

Fireball

14706

 

2

Gerry Ryan & John McAree

470

777

3

Louise McKenna & Hermine O’Keeffe

Fireball

14691

4

Tom Murphy

K1

59

5

Niels Warburton

RS400

1138

In elapsed time the Fireball of Court & Syme was the fastest boat on the water, sailing the five laps in 34:40 with Flanagan’s Laser taking 38:47 and McCarthy’s Solo going round in 39:01. Physically, the finishing order on the water was Solo, Fireball and KONA. 

The postponed prize-giving for Series 1, from 17th December, took place in the DMYC Clubhouse after racing with prizes being in the form of calendars with photographs by Frostbite stalwart Bob Hobby. Calendars were liberally handed out to winners and volunteers by “Frostbite Director” Neil Colin – Happy New Year!

Published in DMYC
Tagged under

The forecast was for wind! The Frostbite organisers were expecting wind as they posted on Facebook that although the wind in the earlier part of the day was strong, it was due to moderate by the start of the afternoon writes Cormac Bradley. In the dinghy park, as we rigged, there was a sense that the gusts were strong as they whistled through the rigging and on looking out on the seascape of the harbour; it was obvious there was wind on the water. Wind direction was WNW in the range of 280 - 295˚.

In the warmth of the Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club, post-racing, a review of the wind records for the dlharbour website showed that the base wind strength was in the range of 18 – 20 knots with gusts getting into the high twenties; 27 – 30knots. So much for the moderation!

The Fast PY fleet was made up of five Fireballs, the 470 and the single-handed K1. In the Slow PY fleet the “usual suspects” were present; the Solo of Shane McCarthy, the Wayfarer of Monica Schaeffer and Miriam McCarthy, the RS Feva XL of Conor Galligan, the two KONA Windsurfers of Robbie Walker and Des Gibney and the Hartley 12.2 of Odhran Prouveur & Helen Sheehy. The Lasers had a reasonable turnout as well.

A five lap trapezoid was set as the order of the day and the favoured route up the first beat was a starboard tack exit from the start line, across to the left hand-side of the course before a decision to tack onto port and make one’s way to the weather mark which was again located in the area of the “knee” of the West Pier.  On a windward to leeward basis, Noel Butler & Marie Barry (15061) were closest to the committee boat at the gun and thus occupied the windward slot, below them were Neil Colin & Margaret Casey (14775), David & Michael Keegan (14676), Louise McKenna & Cormac Bradley (14691) and Frank Miller & Ed Butler (14713). While Miller was furthest to lee, it also meant that h was the first to reach a theoretical port lay-line and thus he had the comfort of being able to tack and clear the fleet. Butler had gone earlier, favouring a middle of the beat approach and these two led the fleet around the first weather, with Miller leading. Behind them the order was McKenna, Colin and Keegan.

In the blustery conditions, particularly around the weather mark, the top reach was too tight to fly spinnaker until the last 50m so most people two-sailed the majority of the leg and started the hoist procedure just before reaching Mark 2 which was situated just outside the approach to the marina. This left the leg from 2 to 3 as a broad spinnaker leg and indeed as the afternoon progressed the gybe into Mark 3 was taking place earlier and earlier up the leg. At Mark 3, most people decided that “flying the bag” was not the way to go………but as the leader, Miller had to set an example so he and Ed flew it to great effect until it came to getting it down when they were forced to fall off to leeward. That gave Butler and Barry the opportunity to power over the top, into the lead. For the balance of the race, Butler stayed well ahead and as usual his race on the water was determined by how many of the earlier starting boats he could pass. Miller too had a comfortable remainder of the race – no-one got close to him. Colin and Casey and McKenna & Bradley were in close company for the first lap but Colin’s race came unstuck when he had the first of two capsizes at the bottom end of the course. However, he got back into the race and indeed caught McKenna on the next beat until a second capsize in the vicinity of the weather mark brought his race to a premature close.

The Keegans set an example for all of us by flying the spinnaker across the bottom reach on all bar one of the laps. However, upwind they lost ground to McKenna & Bradley so that for each lap the gap opened and then closed.  However, up the last beat the distance between them closed dramatically and in the final approach to the weather mark, with Keegans charging up the port lay-line and McKenna closing in on the mark on the starboard lay-line, McKenna got blown over, allowing the Keegans to slip into a well-deserved third place on the water and the daily Frostbite Mug.

At the daily prize-giving afterwards, Principal Organiser, Neil Colin, made the comment that all the starters had finished the race with the conspicuous exception of two Fireballs – a most unusual occurrence. 

DMYC Frostbites 2017/18

Series 1 – Fast PY Overall

Class

Sail No.

R1

R3

R4

R5

R6

R7

R8

Tot

Nett

1

Noel Butler & Marie Barry/Shane Diviney

Fireball 15061

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

8

7

2

Frank Miller & Ed Butler/

Cormac Bradley/Grattan Donnelly

Fireball

14713

2

5

2

3

2

14

2

30

16

3

Neil Colin & Margaret Casey

Fireball

14775

3

14

3

4

3

14

8

49

35

4

David & Michael Keegan

Fireball

14676

4

14

7

6

5

14

3

53

39

5

Tom Murphy

K1

59

5

14

14

7

6

4

5

55

41

(Scores have changed in accordance with final entries – thus a DNC now counts as 14 points whereas in earlier tables this was a lesser score.)

Thus Noel Butler almost made a clean sweep of the Fast PY Fleet and the banter in the club afterwards was to the effect that the only race he managed to lose on the water was when he had the World Champion GP14 helm as his crew. You just can’t rely on reputation!

On the water the only boat that Butler & Barry didn’t pass was the KONA Windsurfer of Robbie Walker which went round the 5 laps in 41 minutes. Noel was next at 46 minutes, followed by the second KONA of Des Gibney and the Fireball of Miller & Butler at 47 minutes while Shane McCarthy took 49 minutes.

This concludes the pre-Christmas Frostbites with racing due to resume on January 7th when the prize-giving for Series 1 is also due to take place – it had to be postponed from yesterday. Accordingly therefore, this correspondent signs off by wishing everyone a Happy Christmas and a Peaceful & Prosperous New Year.

Published in DMYC
Tagged under

It was most probably a combination of the weather forecast, the actual weather or the time of year (two Sundays before Christmas), but yesterday’s Frostbite fleet was considerably reduced and only two Fireballs answered the starter’s call writes Cormac Bradley. An indication of the weather was the fact that the keelboats were cancelled in the morning and later we also heard that the Howth Autumn Series was cancelled. On Facebook I read that the sailing at Datchet Water was cancelled and seeing the waves off Hayling Island (in a photograph on Facebook), I can’t imagine that anyone was sailing there either.

Even the recently acquired Dun Laoghaire based MOCRA 60 was out under reefed main and small headsail, though that may have more to do with the nature of her business for the day – looking after corporate interests! 

Strangely, the forecast on XCWeather wasn’t extreme with a wind forecast of 10 knots gusting to 15 from an ENE direction and air temperatures of 3- 4 degrees. However, the conditions were a bit windier and a bit colder with snow lying on the hills behind Dun Laoghaire and a decision had been taken that only one race would be sailed. 

The committee boat, under the management of Race Officer Brian Mulkeen, was located just to the west of the HSS docking gantry and he set a 4-lap triangular course for the day’s proceedings. With a weather mark located to the east of the harbour mouth and a gybe mark located to the west of the harbour mouth, the top reach of the course was a spinnaker leg for the first two laps for the Fireballs but the second reach was tighter and discretion rather than valour applied to that leg.    

The majority of the starters headed off the start line on starboard tack – five boats in the Slow PY Fleet, eight Lasers in the second start and the two Fireballs, Finn, K1 and RS 400 in the Fast PY Fleet. Noel Butler & Marie Barry (15061) stayed to the outside of the committee boat so that they were able to start on the committee boat while Louise McKenna & Cormac Bradley (14691) having come into the start area a little early found themselves starting further down the line. The K1 was further to leeward of them but the other starters were between the two Fireballs. Butler tacked early onto port while McKenna stayed on a starboard tack for longer and that was race over. For Butler the chase became one of closing down on the starters ahead of him, while for McKenna the challenge was to stay ahead of the Finn.

The distance between the two Fireballs at the first weather mark was respectable and McKenna got there ahead of the Finn and the RS. Both Fireballs flew spinnaker down the first reach but confusingly, Butler held it through the gybe but dropped it immediately and it was only when they did it the second time that the penny dropped – the drop was on that side so that it was correct for the hoist at the next weather mark. It was the correct call as the leg was a lot tighter than it had been on the practice lap. Around the second lap there was little to report, Butler increased his lead and McKenna got away from the Finn. But on the third beat, McKenna went right early while the Finn worked the left-hand side. A header for McKenna saw her fall behind the Finn on the water but she recovered her position before the weather mark and sailed away from him again on the off-wind legs. The second half of the race was breezier with a dark cloud outside the harbour generating the stronger stuff. Bob Hobby, marshalling g the area around Mark 1 was also of the view that this had also brought in a flurry of snow, but we weren’t specifically aware of that. By the finish the lead on the water over the Finn was approximately 1:20 in favour of the Fireball but that subsequently proved to be insufficient. In terms of his “unofficial chase” of the boats starting ahead of him, it may well have been that the Solo was the only boat to save his time on Butler.

As has been the case for all of the Sundays to date, the action at the head of the Slow PY Fleet was between the Solo and the Wayfarer and today (again) the Solo had the upper-hand.  While the lead on the water stayed fairly constant, Shane McCarthy was a comfortable leader throughout the entire race. Behind them the IDRA14 of Frank Hamilton led the chase and ultimately he did enough time-wise to secure third place on handicap and taker the day’s Frostbite Mug. With Hugh Sheehy (Finn) and Butler already having Frostbite Mugs, the day’s Mug went to Louise McKenna and Cormac Bradley.

DMYC Frostbites: Overall Fast PY Fleet

R1

R3

R4

R5

R6

R7

Tot

1

Noel Butler & Marie Barry

FB 15061

1

2

1

1

1

1

7

2

Frank Miller & Ed Butler/CormacBradley/Grattan Donnelly

FB14713

2

5

2

3

2

6

20

3

Neil Colin & Margaret Casey

FB14775

3

7

3

4

3

6

26

4

Alistair Court & Gordon Syme

FB14706

7

3

5

2

8

6

31

4

Hugh Sheehy (Finn)

2

7

1

4

9

8

2

31

6

Louise McKenna & Hermine O’Keeffe/Cormac Bradley

14691

7

7

10

5

4

2

35

Published in DMYC
Tagged under
Page 8 of 19

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2022

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating