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Rowing was the first sport to win a medal for Ireland at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. The Women’s Four of Aifric Keogh, Eimear Lambe, Fiona Murtagh and Emily Hegarty won Bronze in the Women’s Four A Final in the early hours of Wednesday morning.

The four are the first open weight Irish crew and female athletes to win a medal for Ireland in Rowing at an Olympic Games. Aifirc, Eimear, Fiona and Emily were racing against crews from Great Britain, Australia, Netherlands, China and Poland.

The Irish boat finished with a time of 06:20.46 to secure their Bronze medal.

A FINAL

Women’s Four (W4-) – Aifric Keogh, Eimear Lambe, Emily Hegarty & Fiona Murtagh – 3RD – BRONZE MEDAL – 06:20.46

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In her third Olympic Games, the current World Rowing Champion in the Women’s Singles Sanita Puspure won her quarter-final in impressive style in today’s race in Tokyo, and will now compete in the semi-final A/B next Tuesday.

The Women’s Pair of Monika Dukarska and Aileen Crowley and the Lightweight Women’s Double of Margaret Cremen and Aoife Casey also progressed to the semi-finals from their repechages this morning.

There was disappointment for the Men’s Double of Philip Doyle and Ronan Byrne though, whose sixth-place finish in the semi-final in 6.49.06 was not enough to progress to the A Final.

Four Irish boats were racing on the third day of rowing at the Tokyo Olympics. Three Irish boats qualified for the A/B Semi-Finals and the Men’s Double will race in the B Final.

The Women’s Pair of Aileen Crowley & Monika Dukarska finished third in the Repechage this morning. Aileen and Monika competed against Megan Kalmoe & Tracey Eisser (USA), Kaifeng Huang & Jinchao Liu (China) and Maria Kyridou & Christina Ioanna Bourmpou (Greece). Aileen and Monika finished with a time of 07:31.99. Aileen and Monika will race in the A/B Semi-Final Tuesday morning

Margaret Cremen and Aoife Casey finished third in the Lightweight Women’s Double Sculls Repechage. Margaret and Aoife competed against Valentina Cavallar & Louisa Altenhuber (Austria), Thi Thao Luong & Thi Hao Dinh (Vietnam), Patricia Merz & Frederique Rol (Switzerland), Yulisa Lopez & Jennieffer Zuinga (Guatemala) and Anatasia Lebedeva & Maria Botalova (Russian Olympic Committee). Margaret and Aoife finished with a time of 07:23.46. Margaret and Aoife will race in the A/B Semi-Final Tuesday morning.

Sanita Pušpure finished first in the Women’s Single Sculls Quarter-Final. Sanita faced competition from Wing Yan Winnie Hung (Hong Kong), Jovana Arsic (Serbia), Kara Kohler (USA), Yan Jiang (China) and Alejandra Alonso (Paraguay). Sanita won the Heat comfortably with a time of 07:58.30 finishing ahead of Kara Kohler (USA) and Yan Jiang (China). Sanita will now race in the A/B Semi-Final on Wednesday morning.

Ronan Byrne and Philip Doyle finished sixth in the Men’s Double Sculls A/B Semi-Final. Ronan and Phil competed against Miroslaw Zietarski & Mateusz Biskup (Poland), Jack Lopas & Christopher Harris (New Zealand), Graeme Thomas & John Collins (Great Britain), Hugo Boucheron & Matthew Androdias (France), and Stephan Krueger & Marc Weber (Germany). Ronan and Phil finished with a time of 06.49.06 and Ronan and Phil will now race in the B Final on Wednesday morning.

Day 3 Results

Repechage

Women’s Pair (W2-) Monika Dukarska & Aileen Crowley – 4th – 07:31.99

Lightweight Women’s Double Sculls (LW2x) – Margaret Cremen & Aoife Casey – 3rd – 07:23.46

Quarter-Final

Women’s Single Sculls (W1x) – Sanita Puspure – 1st – 07:58.30

A/B Semi-Final

Men’s Double Sculls (M2x) – Ronan Byrne & Philip Doyle – 6th – 06.49.06

Next Irish Races (Confirmed)

Tuesday 27th Racing (IST)
A/B Semi-Final

Women’s Pair (W2-) Monika Dukarska & Aileen Crowley – 02:58/03:08 (TBC)

Lightweight Men;s Double Sculls (LM2x) – Fintan McCarthy & Paul O’Donovan – 03:18/03:28 (TBC)

Lightweight Women’s Double Sculls (LW2x) – Margaret Cremen & Aoife Casey – 03:38/03:48 (TBC)

Wednesday 28th (IST)
B Final

Men’s Double Sculls (M2x) – Ronan Byrne & Philip Doyle – 00:42

Women’s Four (W4-) – Aifric Keogh, Eimear Lambe, Emily Hegarty & Fiona Murtagh – 01:50

A/B Semi-Final

Women’s Single Sculls (W1x) – Sanita Puspure – 02:58/03:08 (TBC)

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Five Irish crews were competing on the second day of rowing at the Olympics. One A Final, two A/B Semi-Finals, one Quarter-Final and two Repechages are confirmed after the racing this morning.

Ronan Byrne and Philip Doyle competed in the Men’s Double Sculls Repechage. The Irish Men’s Double finished third and qualified for the A/B Semi-Final. Ronan and Phil competed against Jakub Podrazil & Jan Cincibuch (Czech Republic), Saulius Ritter & Aurimas Adomavicius (Lithuania), and Stephan Krueger & Marc Weber (Germany). Ronan and Phil finished with a time of 06:29.90 and will race in the A/B Semi-Final tomorrow morning.

Aileen Crowley, left, and Monika Dukarska of Ireland in action during the heats of the Women's Pair at the Sea Forest Waterway during the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan. Photo by Seb Daly/SportsfileAileen Crowley, left, and Monika Dukarska of Ireland in action during the heats of the Women's Pair at the Sea Forest Waterway during the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan. Photo by Seb Daly/Sportsfile

The Women’s Pair of Aileen Crowley & Monika Dukarska finished fourth in their Heat. Aileen and Monika competed against Aina Cid & Virginia Diaz Rivas (Spain), Grace Prendergast & Kerri Gowler (New Zealand), and Hedvig Rasmussen & Fie Udby Erichsen (Denmark). Aileen and Monika finished with a time of 07:24.71. Aileen and Monika will race in the Repechage tomorrow morning

Margaret Cremen and Aoife Casey finished fifth in the Lightweight Women’s Double Sculls Heat. Margaret and Aoife competed against Valentina Rodini & Federica Cesarini (Italy), Laura Tarantola & Claire Bove (France), Patricia Merz & Frederique Rol (Switzerland), Mutiara Putri & Melani Putri (Indonesia) and Mary Reckford & Michelle Sechser (USA). Margaret and Aoife finished with a time of 07:17.67 and will now race in the Repechage tomorrow morning.

Aoife Casey, left, and Margaret Cremen of Ireland in action during the heats of the Women's Lightweight Double Sculls at the Sea Forest Waterway during the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan. Photo by Seb Daly/SportsfileAoife Casey, left, and Margaret Cremen of Ireland in action during the heats of the Women's Lightweight Double Sculls at the Sea Forest Waterway during the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan. Photo by Seb Daly/Sportsfile

Fintan McCarthy and Paul O’Donovan won the Lightweight Men’s Double Sculls Heat. Fintan and Paul competed against Jiri Simanek & Miroslav Vrastil (Czech Republic), Jerzy Kowalski & Artur Mikołajczewski (Poland), Igor Khmara & Stanislav Kovalov (Ukraine), Bruno Cetraro Berriolo & Felipe Kluver Ferreira (Uruguay) and Arjun Lal Jat & Arvind Singh (India). They finished with a time of 06:23.74 and will race in the A/B Semi-Final on Tuesday morning.

Speaking after the race, Olympic Silver Medallist Paul O’Donovan said, “We won the race, so it’s hard to do much better than that – you don’t want to win by 20 seconds either, because it’s very hot out there. It was still tough, all the races at this regatta will be tough. But it’s difficult to complain with that result.”

Commenting on the changeable conditions, Fintan McCarthy added: “I reckon we row in all sorts of conditions in training and we are used to adapting to whatever condition is thrown at us. It’s about being adaptable and doing what we do in training.”

Aifric Keogh, Eimear Lambe, Fiona Murtagh and Emily Hegarty of Ireland in action during the heats of the Women's Four at the Sea Forest Waterway during the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan. Photo by Seb Daly/SportsfileAifric Keogh, Eimear Lambe, Fiona Murtagh and Emily Hegarty of Ireland in action during the heats of the Women's Four at the Sea Forest Waterway during the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan. Photo by Seb Daly/Sportsfile

The Women’s Four of Aifric Keogh, Eimear Lambe, Emily Hegarty & Fiona Murtagh qualified for the A Final by finishing second in their Heat. Aifric, Eimear, Emily and Fiona competed against crews from Australia, Romania, Denmark and the USA. The Irish Women’s Four finished with a time of 06:28.99 and will now race in the A Final on Wednesday morning.

Day 2 Results

Repechage

Men’s Double Sculls (M2x) – Ronan Byrne & Philip Doyle – 3rd – 06:29.90

Heats

Women’s Pair (W2-) Monika Dukarska & Aileen Crowley – 4th – 07:24.71

Lightweight Women’s Double Sculls (LW2x) – Margaret Cremen & Aoife Casey – 5th- 07:17.67

Lightweight Men;s Double Sculls (LM2x) – Fintan McCarthy & Paul O’Donovan – 1st – 06:23.74

Women’s Foul (W4-) – Aifric Keogh, Eimear Lambe, Emily Hegarty & Fiona Murtagh – 2nd – 06:28.99

Next Irish Races (Confirmed)

Sunday 25th Racing (IST)

Repechage

Women’s Pair (W2-) Monika Dukarska & Aileen Crowley – 01:50

Lightweight Women’s Double Sculls (LW2x) – Margaret Cremen & Aoife Casey – 02:20/02:30 (Time to be confirmed)

Quarter-Final

Women’s Single Sculls (W1x) – Sanita Pušpure – 03:00 – 03:30 (Time to be confirmed)

A/B Semi-Final

Men’s Double Sculls (M2x) – Ronan Byrne & Philip Doyle – 04:40/04:50 (Time to be confirmed)

Tuesday 27th Racing (IST)

A/B Semi-Final

Lightweight Men’s Double Sculls (LM2x) – Fintan McCarthy & Paul O’Donovan – 03:18/03:28 (TBC)

Wednesday 28th (IST)

A Final

Women’s Foul (W4-) – Aifric Keogh, Eimear Lambe, Emily Hegarty & Fiona Murtagh – 01:50

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Rowing kicked off the 2020 Tokyo Olympics this morning. Two Irish crews competed in their heats at the Sea Forest Waterway. Sanita Pušpure raced in the Women’s Single Sculls and Ronan Byrne and Phil Doyle raced in the Men’s Double Sculls.

Sanita Pušpure finished first in the Women’s Single Sculls Heat. Sanita faced competition from Kathleen Noble (Uganda), Anneta Kyridou (Greece), Felice Chow (Trinidad and Tobago) and Joan Poh (Singapore. Sanita won the Heat with a time of 07:46.08.

Sanita has progressed to the Quarter-Final, which will take place on Monday morning. Listen to interview below

The second Irish crew saw the Men’s Double Sculls of Ronan Byrne and Philip Doyle finish fourth in their heat. Ronan and Phil competed against, Barnabe Delarze and Roman Roeoesli (Switzerland), Jack Lopas and Christopher Harris (New Zealand) and Miroslaw Zietarski and Mateusz Biskup (Poland). The Irish crew finished with a time of 06:14.40 in a very tight race but the crew from New Zealand just finished ahead of the Irish Crew to secure the final A/B Semi-Final spot.

Ronan and Phil will compete in Repechage on Saturday morning at 01:40.

Irish Results

Heats

Women’s Single Sculls (W1x) – Sanita Pušpure – 1st – 07:46.08

Men’s Double Sculls (M2x) – Ronan Byrne & Philip Doyle – 4th – 06:14.40

Saturday 24th Racing (IST) Repechage

Men’s Double Sculls (M2x) – Ronan Byrne & Philip Doyle – 01:40

Heats

Women’s Pair (W2-) Monika Dukarska & Aileen Crowley – 02:10

Lightweight Women’s Double Sculls (LW2x) – Margaret Cremen & Aoife Casey – 02:50

Lightweight Men’s Double Sculls (LM2x) – Fintan McCarthy & Paul O’Donovan – 03:30

Women’s Four (W4-) – Aifric Keogh, Eimear Lambe, Emily Hegarty & Fiona Murtagh – 04:00

Monday’s Racing (IST) Quarter-Final

Women’s Single Sculls (W1x) – Sanita Pušpure – 01:00 – 01:30 (Time to be confirmed)

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Five Irish boats competed on the final day of the World Rowing Under 23 Championships. Two Irish crews took home a Silver Medal, and out of six competing crews, four reached A Finals, and two reached B Finals.

The Coxed Men’s Four won Silver in the A Final on Saturday afternoon. Finn O’Reilly, Andrew Sheehan, Ryan Spelman, Adam Murphy and Leah O’Regan (cox) finished second behind the Italian crew. They competed against crews from the USA, Germany, Italy, Nederlands, and France. They finished with a time of 06:12.84 to take home the Silver Medal.

Ross Corrigan, John Kearney, Alex Byrne and Jack Dorney won a Silver Medal in the M4- A Final. Ross, John, Alex and Jack started the race in front, but the Canadian boat closed the gap and took first place. Ross, John, Alex, and Jack finished ahead of the British boat to secure their Silver Medal with a time of 05:58.66.

Alison Bergin competed in the Women’s Single Sculls B Final, placing third with a final time of 08:06.47. Alison faced tough competition with crews from the Netherlands, Italy, USA, Russia and Austria. The boats from the Netherlands and Italy finished first and second, with Alison placing third.

Hugh Moore competed in the LM1x B Final, finishing fourth with a time of 07:18.71. Hugh led early in the race but was overtaken by the American and Danish boats after the 1,250-meter mark. Hugh narrowly missed out on a third-place by a tenth of a second to the German sculler.

Cliodhna Nolan finished fourth in the LW1x A Final. Cliodhna faced tough competition with crews from Italy, Russia, Greece, Germany and Austria. Cliodhna finished ahead of the German and Austrian boats to take fourth place. Cliodhna finished with a final time of 07:59.63.

Eoin Gaffney and Rory O’Neill raced in the LM2x A Final in the final race of the day for Irish Crews. Eoin and Rory finished fourth behind crews from German, France and Belgium. They beat the boats from Poland and Switzerland to secure the fourth-place finish. Eoin and Rory finished with a time of 06:29.91.

The Coxed Men’s Four won Silver in the A Final on Saturday afternoon. Finn O’Reilly, Andrew Sheehan, Ryan Spelman, Adam Murphy and Leah O’Regan (cox) finished second behind the Italian crew. They competed against crews from the USA, Germany, Italy, Nederlands, and France. They finished with a time of 06:12.84 to take home the Silver Medal.

Rowing Ireland’s High-Performance Director, Antonio Maurogiovanni said, “I want to congratulate all of the athletes and coaches on their performances and results in the U23 World Championships this week.

We had six crews competing this week and out of the six, four reached the A Final and two crews reached the B Final. The Coxed Men’s Four and Men’s Four both won Silver in races with very tough competition.

Thank you to all the athletes, coaches, clubs, and their families for their commitment and hard work in preparation for the World Championships.

The team was well coordinated by the Coaches Coordinator and their Team Manager and all put in a large amount of work over the last couple of months and we are proud of their performances and results. Their passion and enthusiasm has been evident throughout their training camp and competition.

I look forward to seeing these athletes develop further and reach their potential in the next number of years after training as well as they did at the National Rowing Centre.”

Final Results

M4+ (Finn O’Reilly, Andrew Sheehan, Ryan Spelman, Adam Murphy and Leah O’Regan (Cox)) – 2nd – A Final – Silver Medal

M4- (Ross Corrigan, John Kearney, Alex Byrne and Jack Dorney) – 2nd – A Final – Silver Medal

W1x (Alison Bergin) – B Final – 3rd

LM1x (Hugh Moore) – B Final – 4th

LW1x (Cliodhna Nolan) – A Final – 4th

LM2x (Eoin Gaffney and Rory O’Neill) – A Final – 4th

Coaching and Support Staff

Antonio Maurogiovanni – High-Performance Director

Ciro Prisco – National Coach and Coach Coordinator

John Armstrong – National Coach

Nicolo’ Maurogiovanni – National Coach

Michael O’Rourke Team Manager

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The only similarity between the Viking ships that raided Larne Lough in the ninth century and the boats used by the Olderfleet Rowing Club is that they are slender. The name 'Olderfleet' is thought to be a corruption of Ulfrecksfiord (or Ulfried's Fjord), the Viking name for Larne Lough, which lies on the east coast of County Antrim. It is a busy ferry port connecting with Cairnryan in Scotland.

The Club, which offers social and competitive coastal rowing along the Antrim coast, was founded early last year by Barbara Johnston, and with the help of the local business community, the club is going from strength to strength with 97 members and plans for continued growth. Not only that, but Olderfleet Rowing Club is proudly supporting Friends of the Cancer Centre and as well as raising money and awareness of the charity, the club will be giving teenagers and young adults with cancer the opportunity to get out on the water and try rowing for themselves.

Olderfleet Rowing Club, which has members of all ages, trains Mondays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays on Larne Lough and the open seaOlderfleet Rowing Club, which has members of all ages, trains Mondays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays on Larne Lough and the open sea

The club's base is beside the East Antrim Boat Club slip, giving access to the sheltered lough and the Co Antrim coast. The boats, two quads and two doubles, are kept in containers, and the club recently received a grant for a portacabin beside EABC.

Commenting on what inspired her to start her own rowing club, Barbara said: "I come from a rowing family, and I have been rowing myself for eight years. It is an incredible sport that I have fallen in love with, and I decided to establish my own club earlier this year. Olderfleet Rowing Club opened in February, and with the help and support of James Boomer and Norman Black, we are building a really great community".

Norman Black is one of the club's founders and a constant driving force. He coxes and coaches and is a long time Antrim Coast rower. The club is fortunate to have as Club coach James Boomer, who coached at two commonwealth regattas, Canada and Scotland. He was Head Coach for the Scottish regatta when Northern Ireland won its first-ever Gold. He has also coached Irish Junior level rowers at Home Internationals. He explains his outlook; "Coaching ranges from absolute beginners to seasoned racers, with a focus on personal, technical and crew development. Everyone is given the same opportunities to let them develop their rowing ability. Rowing is a truly wonderful sport, and I am only too glad to help people achieve their goals".

The club, which has members of all ages, trains Mondays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays on Larne Lough and the open sea.

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In a new statement, Rowing Ireland has backed down from their claim that the Afloat piece on a media ban on athletes was wrong.

Today's statement, on their site, says:

"Rowing Ireland wishes to clarify the situation regarding media coverage. International athletes have not been available for media interviews since the Lucerne World Cup. These restrictions do not, in our view, amount to a ban.

Rowing Ireland is happy to clear up this miscommunication and we apologise if the wrong impression was given in an earlier statement. We would like to thank the press for their continued support.

We will try to facilitate media requests with the athletes depending on their ongoing preparations, training and upcoming travel. The next Rowing Ireland media day will take place in the coming weeks ahead of the Olympics competition, with an opportunity for the media to speak with selected athletes.

Details will be announced in due course. All further media queries should be directed to [email protected]"

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Five Medals were won by Irish Crews at the World Rowing Cup II this weekend. Paul O’Donovan and Fintan McCarthy won Gold in the Lightweight Men’s Sculls. Ronan Byrne and Philip Doyle won Silver in the Men’s Double, Monika Dukarska and Aileen Crowley won Silver in the Women’s Pair, Lydia Heaphy won Silver in the Lightweight Women’s Sculls, and Sanita Puspure won Bronze in the Women’s Single Sculls. Nine Irish crews competed at the World Rowing Cup II, and eight crews made it to the A Finals.

Jack Dorney, Alex Byrne, John Kearney and Ross Corrigan competed in the Men’s Four B Final, finishing third with a time of 06:16.20. The Irish boat sustained efforts throughout the race, competing against two Swiss crews and one Dutch crew. This result leaves the crew with a standing of ninth overall for this weekend.

Aileen Crowley and Monika Dukarska raced in the Women’s Pair A Final, resulting in a time of 07.22.17 for second place. Aileen and Monika’s efforts saw them take second place in the final 200 metres, earning their place on the podium with a silver medal.

Tara Hanlon and Claire Feerick also competed in the Women’s Pair A Final and placed fifth with a final time of 07:29.89. Both boats faced crews from Spain, Romania, Chile, and the Czech Republic.

Ronan Byrne and Phil Doyle raced in the Men’s Double Sculls A Final, placing second with a time of 06:19.05. Ronan and Phil faced tight competition from their Chinese counterparts, Zhang Lin and Zhiyu Liu, racing neck and neck from the 1,000 metres mark right up to the finish line. China edged ahead by 0.14 seconds, Ronan and Phil claimed the silver medal and a place on the podium.

After some times recently, Cork's Sanita Puspure is back on the podium. One of five Irish medallists at LucerneAfter some times recently, Cork's Sanita Puspure is back on the podium. One of five Irish medallists at Lucerne World Rowing/Twitter

Sanita Puspure raced in the Women’s Single Sculls A Final, coming third with a time of 07:30.02 to secure a bronze medal. Sanita closed ground in the final hundred metres of the race but was passed by American rower Kara Kohler as they approached the line. Sanita faced rowers from Austria, Switzerland, the United States, and Russia.

Daire Lynch competed in the Men’s Single Sculls A Final, placing sixth with a final time of 07:01.90. Oliver Zeidler of Germany took home the Gold. Daire faced a strong field, racing alongside Norwegian, Lithuanian, Danish and German rowers.

Paul O’Donovan and Fintan McCarthy placed first in the Lightweight Men’s Double Sculls Final A with a time of 06:15.48. Paul and Fintan claimed the lead in the first 900 metres, battling with the Norwegian crew Kristoffer Brun and Are Weierholt Strandli for pole position. The crew won Gold with a 14 metre lead in Ireland’s final race in Lucerne this weekend.

Rowing Ireland’s CEO, Michelle Carpenter said, “I want to congratulate all the athletes and team on their results this weekend. We are delighted to see five medals after all the dedication and hard work in training camp over the last months.

Well done to our High-Performance Director, Antonio Maurogiovanni, the coaches, support staff, and the athletes’ clubs and families. The support the team has is a substantial factor in their continued success. Now that we know where we are, we are looking forward to focusing on the important road ahead.”

Chair of Rowing Ireland’s High-Performance Committee, Neville Maxwell, said, “Overall we are very happy with the results of the Irish Team over the weekend in Lucerne. To come away with so many crews in A finals and five medals is a considerable achievement.

The group is now looking forward to having a quick rest and getting ready for the Tokyo Olympics, where further improvements will be made. We are delighted with the weekend, and Irish Rowing is in a good place.”

Irish Results

LW1x Lydia Heaphy – 2nd – A Final – Silver Medal

LM1x Gary O’Donovan – 4th – A Final

M4- Jack Dorney, Alex Byrne, John Kearney & Ross Corrigan – 4th – B Final

W2- Aileen Crowley & Monika Dukarska – 2nd – A Final – Silver Medal

W2- Tara Hanlon & Claire Feerick – 5th – A Final

M2x Ronan Byrne & Phil Doyle – 2nd – A Final -Silver Medal

W1x Sanita Puspure – 3rd – A Final – Bronze Medal

M1x Daire Lynch – 6th – A Final

LM2x Paul O’Donovan & Fintan McCarthy – 1st – A Final – Gold Medal

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Irish rower Lydia Heaphy won the Silver Medal in the Lightweight Women’s Single on Day Two of the World Rowing Cup II in Lucerne. 

Gary O’Donovan finished fourth in the Lightweight Men’s Single Final. The remaining seven crews will be racing on Sunday morning.

Eight of the nine Irish crews competing this weekend qualified for A Finals.

Lydia Heaphy placed second in the Lightweight Women’s Single Sculls A Final, with a time of 08:25.15. Lydia faced tough competition but held strong ground, and she managed to edge ahead of Italian rower Federica Cesarini, securing second place. Lydia earned herself a spot on the podium with a silver medal. Lydia raced rowers from Switzerland, Italy, China, and the Netherlands.

Lydia Heaphy competed in the Lightweight Women’s Sculls A/B Semi-Final, finishing first with a time of 08:32.81, and progressed into the A Final. Lydia faced tough competition with crews from Italy, Switzerland, Germany, and Great Britain.

Gary O’Donovan competed in the Lightweight Men’s Single Sculls Final A, placing fourth with a time of 07:24.52. Gary was rowing alongside Chilean Felipe Andres Cardenas Morales, who finished ahead of Gary by a tenth of a second. The race saw tough competition throughout, with two rowers from Italy also earning places on the podium.

Gary O’Donovan qualified for the A Final by finishing second in the Lightweight Men’s Single Sculls A/B Semi-Final. It was a tight race with two boats from France and the Chilean boat competing with Gary for the three available places. Gary finished second behind the French Sculler by less than two-tenths of a second. Gary finished with a time of 07:35.59 and moved into the A Final.

Aileen Crowley and Monika Dukarska competed in the Women’s Pair Repechage, finishing first with a time of 07:35.44, qualifying for the A final. It was a close race right until the last hundred metres, in which Aileen and Monika fought off the Chilean team to claim first place. They will race in the A Final on Sunday morning.

Tara Hanlon and Claire Feerick also competed in the Women’s Pair Repechage, finishing third and also qualifying for the A final. Tara and Claire finished with a time of 07:40.73. Both pairs faced teams from Chile, China and the Czech Republic. Tara and Claire will race in the A Final on Sunday.

Ronan Byrne and Phil Doyle competed in the Men’s Double Sculls A/B semi-final, finishing in first with a time of 06:27.65. The double made substantial progress in the final 500 metres, beating the British crew by less than a second and securing their place in the A Final on Sunday.

Jack Dorney, Alex Byrne, John Kearney and Ross Corrigan competed in the Men’s Four Repechage, finishing fifth with a time of 06:21.50. It was a close race, with teams from Italy, Switzerland and the Netherlands battling for two places in the A Final, ultimately resulting in a win for the Dutch team. Jack, Alex, John and Ross will compete in the B Final on Sunday.

In the Women’s Single Sculls, Sanita Puspure finished second with a time of 08:06.18 in the A/B Semi-Final. The race was won by Victoria Thornley of Great Britain, who led by just over one second. Sanita rowed alongside scullers from the United States, Greece, Mexico and the Netherlands and secured her place in the A Final.

Daire Lynch placed third in the Men’s Single Sculls A/B Semi-Final with a time of 07:12.29. Daire fought off competition from Japanese rower Ryuta Arakawa, gaining ground in the last 500 metres and securing the remaining place in the A Final. This was a tight race right until the end, with the top four crews finishing within three-and-a-half seconds of each other.

Paul O’Donovan & Fintan McCarthy competed in the Lightweight Men’s Double Sculls A/B Semi-Final. The double started strong and maintained a steady lead to finish first with a time of 06:36.95. Paul and Fintan finished four seconds ahead of their Belgian counterparts, who finished second. The pair secured their place in the A Final on Sunday morning.

Sunday’s Racing Times (IST)

08:45 M4- (Jack Dorney, Alex Byrne, John Kearney & Ross Corrigan) B Final

09:15 W2- (Aileen Crowley & Monika Dukarska) – A Final

09:15 W2- (Tara Hanlon & Claire Feerick) – A Final

10:28 M2x (Ronan Byrne & Phil Doyle) – A Final

11:13 W1x (Sanita Puspure) – A Final

11:29 M1x (Daire Lynch)- A Final

11:44 LM2x (Paul O’Donovan & Fintan McCarthy) – A Final

Saturdays Results

LW1x (Lydia Heaphy) – 1st – A/B Semi-Final

LM1x (Gary O’Donovan) – 2nd – A/B Semi-Final

W2- (Aileen Crowley & Monika Dukarska) – 1st – Repechage

W2- (Tara Hanlon & Claire Feerick) – 3rd – Repechage

M2x (Ronan Byrne & Phil Doyle) – 1st – A/B Semi-Final

M4- (Jack Dorney, Alex Byrne, John Kearney & Ross Corrigan) – 5th – Repechage

W1x (Sanita Puspure) – 2nd – A/B Semi-Final

M1x (Daire Lynch) – 3rd – A/B Semi-Final

LM2x (Paul O’Donovan & Fintan McCarthy) – 1st – A/B Semi-Final

Saturday’s A Final Results

14:15 LW1x (Lydia Heaphy) – 2nd – A Final

14:27 LM1x (Gary O’Donovan – 4th – A Final

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Rowing Ireland had nine crews competing at the World Rowing Cup II in Lucerne today. Six of the crews qualified directly to the A/B Semi-Final and three will compete in the Repechage on Saturday morning.

Crowley & Dukarska Second in Women’s Pair

There were two Irish boats competing in the first heat in the Women’s Pair. Aileen Crowley and Monika Dukarska finished second behind the Spanish boat. Tara Hanlon and Claire Feerick finished fourth with less than half a second behind the Czech Boat. Aileen and Monika finished with a time of 07:30.12 and Tara and Claire finished with a time of 07:41.36. As only the first-place crew went directly to the A Final, both Irish boats will compete in the Repechage on Saturday.

Men’s Double of Byrne & Doyle first in heat

The Men’s Double of Ronan Byrne and Philip Doyle finished first in their Heat. Ronan and Phil led from the start and beat the crews from France, Great Britain and Lithuania. They finished with a time of 06:16.31 and progressed to the A/B Semi-Final on Saturday.

Heaphy first in the Lightweight Women’s Single Sculls Heat

Lydia Heaphy finished first in the Lightweight Women’s Single Sculls Heat. Lydia was competing against two Italian crews and a boat from Bulgaria. Lydia raced alongside the Italian Boats from the start and took the lead after the thousand-meter mark. Lydia finished with a time of 07:54.09 and will now race in the A/B Semi-Final on Saturday.

O’Donovan won the Lightweight Men’s Single Sculls Heat

Gary O’Donovan won the Lightweight Men’s Single Sculls Heat. Gary beat crews from Germany, Algeria, Chile and Japan. He took the lead halfway through the race and maintained the strong lead until the finish. Gary finished with a time of 07:10.15 and will race in the A/B Semi-Final on Saturday.

Men’s Four finished third

The Men’s Four finished third in their Heat. Jack, Alex, John and Ross were racing against crews from Great Britain, Poland and Switzerland. They finished third behind the boats from Great Britain and Poland with a time of 06:13.56 and will race in the Repechage on Saturday morning.

Sanita Puspure won the Women’s Single Scull Heat. Sanita beat crews from Austria, Serbia, Netherlands and Sweden. Sanita held the lead for the majority of the race and finished ahead of Magdalena Lobnig with a time of 07:38.45. Sanita will race in the A/B Semi-Final on Saturday.

Lynch second in the Men’s Single Sculls

Daire Lynch finished second in the Men’s Single Sculls Heat. Daire finished behind Oliver Zeidler from Germany and ahead of the boats from Brazil, Norway and Benin. Daire finished with a time of 07:13.98 and progressed to the Quarter Final later in the day.

Daire raced in the Men’s Single Sculls Quarter Final this afternoon and qualified for the A/B Semi-Final by finishing third. Daire finished just behind the sculler from Lithuania and Sverri Nielsen of Denmark went on to win. Daire booked his place in the A/B Semi-Final tomorrow with a time of 07:11.18.

Paul O’Donovan and Fintan McCarthy finished first their Lightweight Men’s Double Sculls Heat. They dominated the heat from the very start and finished well ahead of the chasing pack. They beat crews from Poland, Portugal, Switzerland and Venezuela. Paul and Fintan finished with a time of 06:24.98 and moved to the A/B Semi-Final on Saturday.

Prov. Saturday Times (IST)

09:24/09:30 LW1x (Lydia Heaphy) – A/B Semi-Final

09:36/09:42 LM1x (Gary O’Donovan) – A/B Semi-Final

10:00 W2- (Aileen Crowley & Monika Dukarska) – Repechage

10:00 W2- (Tara Hanlon & Claire Feerick) – Repechage

10:24/10:30 M2x (Ronan Byrne & Phil Doyle) – A/B Semi-Final

10:36 M4- (Jack Dorney, Alex Byrne, John Kearney & Ross Corrigan) – Repechage

10:42/10:48 W1x (Sanita Puspure) – A/B Semi-Final

10:54/11:00 M1x (Daire Lynch) – A/B Semi-Final

11:06/11:12 (Paul O’Donovan & Fintan McCarthy) A/B Semi-Final

Rowing World Cup Day One Results

W2- (Aileen Crowley & Monika Dukarska) – 2nd – Heat

W2- (Tara Hanlon & Claire Feerick) – 4th – Heat

M2x (Ronan Byrne & Phil Doyle) – 1st – Heat

LW1x (Lydia Heaphy) – 1st – Heat

LM1x (Gary O’Donovan) – 1st – Heat

M4- (Jack Dorney, Alex Byrne, John Kearney & Ross Corrigan) – 3rd – Heat

W1x (Sanita Puspure) – 1st – Heat

M1x (Daire Lynch) – 2nd – Heat

M1x (Daire Lynch) – 3rd– Quarter-Final

LM2x (Paul O’Donovan & Fintan McCarthy) – 1st – Heat

Published in Rowing
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Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

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