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Displaying items by tag: Cove Sailing Club

Cove Saling Club’s brand new marina pontoons have been put to immediate use in Cork Harbour with yachts and motorboats occupying the new berths since the opening up of sailing activity on 8th June.

Coronavirus restrictions delayed the original expected completion date in April, but the berthing pontoons are fully assembled and connected to the gangway that was installed earlier this year.

Cobh Marina pontoonsNew Cove Marina

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the Cork Harbour club has also been working on upgrades to its dinghy park facilities including a new meeting room, office and kitchen at Whitepoint in Cobh.

Cove Sailing Club dinghy parking faciltiesCove Sailing Club dinghy parking facilities Photo: Bob Bateman

Published in Cork Harbour
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Colm McDonagh has shared images of further progress on Cove Saling Club’s new marina pontoons in time for the opening up of sailing activity from tomorrow, Monday 8 June.

Coronavirus restrictions delayed the original expected completion date in April, but the berthing pontoons are now well into assembly before connection to the gangway that was installed earlier this year.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the Cork Harbour club has also been working on upgrades to its dinghy park facilities including a new meeting room, office and kitchen at Whitepoint in Cobh.

It’s expected the club will shortly provide an update on summer sailing events and courses upon the latest relaxing of restrictions — which allow members within the same county or 20km to visit, and for bigger groups to sail while observing social distancing.

Published in Cork Harbour
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The problem for resuming normal yacht racing is the current limitation on household crewing of boats only. Because the majority of yachts are not crewed solely by one household, racing is impossible under current restrictions. This is reflected in the intentions of two Cork clubs to resume limited racing, for household-crewed boats only, reports Tom MacSweeney.

Kinsale Yacht Club's limited form of club sailing

Kinsale Yacht Club is proposing to start what Club Commodore Mike Walsh describes as   “a limited form of club sailing next Wednesday (June 10) but only for family/ household boats living within 20kms of the club marina. This would include Squibs, Dragons, Cruisers.”

He has told members that this racing “will be limited to white sail only for cruisers.

“All activities are limited to household units. If there is sufficient interest we will continue this league or series of races until July 20. Starting and finishing will be from the club marina.”

The club intends to start its Junior Sailing/training course on July 6, which is likely to run to the end of August in a restructured schedule. The course is fully booked. Further applications will be put on a waiting list.

Loch Greine, owned by Tom Donal and Declan O'Mahony sailing past Roches Point LighthouseLoch Greine, owned by Tom, Donal and Declan O'Mahony sailing past Roches Point Lighthouse Photo: Bob Bateman

Cruiser racing in Cork HarbourCruiser racing in Cork Harbour Photo: Bob Bateman

Cove Sailing Club's single-handed or single household sailing

Cove Sailing Club in Cork Harbour says it is aiming to resume sailing at the start of July, “assuming government restrictions are lifted at the end of June.”

This also will only be for “single-handed or single household sailing.”

Cove Sailing Club HeadquartersCove Sailing Club Headquarters Photo: Bob Bateman

The club says it will not be able to run “a full programme of training courses similar to the past 13 years, but will endeavour to plan for a return to sailing courses as soon as safely possible.”

Published in Cork Harbour

Cork Harbour has lost a sailing club, which is actually good news for the sport.

If that seems questionable statement, it is not because it brings back together the members of Cove Sailing Club and the Great Island Sailing Club, after a split over ‘differences of attitude and opinion’ as they were described, which occurred due to difficulties in the development of the club’s marina at Whitepoint, just outside the town.

As a result, members who left Cove SC in 2018 set up Great Island Sailing Club to protect and continue, they said, sailing in Cobh. (The club name is spelt differently from the town name).

As the marina project as being progressing satisfactorily and now installation is underway, negotiations between the clubs have been going on. With a positive outcome, Great Island Sailing Club held an EGM to discuss re-joining Cove Sailing Club and a motion to do so was passed unanimously.

“We are looking forward to having a stronger bigger club in Cork Harbour and are very excited with plans for the 2020 season,” said Johanna Murphy, GISC’s Commodore. She confirmed that GISC no longer exists and its members have rejoined Cove SC.

A joint statement from the two clubs said that Cove SC, which celebrated its centenary last year, will continue the Cork Harbour Combined League, which GISC was instrumental in initiating for Cruisers along with the RCYC and Monkstown Bay SC. The Cork Harbour to Dunmore East Race, which was inaugurated last year, will be run by Cove SC at the end of May. It will also be running club events such as the Cove at Home, Cobh People’s Regatta and the Cobh to Blackrock Race.

“The rejuvenated evening dinghy racing will continue this year on Wednesdays throughout the summer as well as the continuation of junior dinghy training. We are also pleased to be hosting the finish of the Dun Laoghaire to Cobh Race (formerly known as the Kingstown-to-Queenstown Race) in association with the National Yacht Club,” said the statement.

Johanna Murphy will continue as Commodore of the South Coast Offshore Racing Association. She is also a member of the Irish Cruiser Racing Association’s board and has been appointed to the Cruiser committee of Cove SC.

On my podcast this week I’m joined by Damian Ahern from Cove Sailing Club’s Committee and who is also a member of their Asset Management Team which is overseeing the new marina installation and other projects within the club. We discuss these developments.

• Listen to the Podcast below.

Published in Tom MacSweeney

A new lecture series in the run-up to the Cobh Traditional Sail Regatta kicks off next week at the Sirius Arts Centre in Cobh with a talk on the key role of marine pilots in busy city docks.

Port of Cork pilot Tony Mulcahy will give his lecture on ‘Berthing a City’ next Thursday 5 March at 7.30pm.

And a forthright later, Ronan O’Connor of Ardmore Adventures will talk ‘Paddles & Penguins: Kayaking South Georgia’ on Thursday 19 March from 7.30pm.

Admission for each lecture is only €5.

Published in Cork Harbour

Cove Sailing Club in Cork Harbour has expressed excitement at progress being made on its new marina.

Planning approval was granted this past May for the marina at Whitepoint, scaled down from a larger scheme that faltered in the planning stages some years ago.

Contracts were signed last month for the 30-berth facility designed by Byrne Looby from their Cork office.

And construction began at the end of October, with the breakwaters recently cast across the water at Ringaskiddy.

“This is a huge step forward in the overall development process and it’s great to see the project progressing and coming together,” said the club, which expects the marina to be completed and open well in advance of the 2020 sailing season.

Richard Marshall, Anne Ahern, Micheál O’Driscoll and Damian Ahern, committee members of Cove Sailing Club, with Paul Murphy of Byrne Looby and local councillor Cathal Rasmussen | Photo: Colm McDonaghRichard Marshall, Anne Ahern, Micheál O’Driscoll and Damian Ahern, committee members of Cove Sailing Club, with Paul Murphy of Byrne Looby and local councillor Cathal Rasmussen | Photo: Colm McDonagh

Speaking at the contract signing last month, Kieran Dorgan, Commodore of Cove Sailing Club, said the new marina would provide state-of-the-art facilities year-round and accommodate both locals and visitors.

This week Cove Sailing Club celebrated its centenary with a gala dinner in the town’s Commodore Hotel, as reported on Afloat.ie yesterday.

Published in Irish Marinas
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Sailing has its ‘ups-and-downs’ and a hundred years brings many changes as the years roll by, both good times and those that are more difficult.

Sailing in the Cork Harbour town of Cobh has experienced this, an experience which underlines that history repeats itself. There were once two sailing clubs in the town, then there was one, now there are two again.

That there are two is the result of difficulties which set back what had been the main club as it approached its centenary. Problems for Cove Sailing Club emanated from the decision to provide a much-needed marina on the town’s seafront when financial problems led to difficulties that had to be dealt with and there was movement away of members who felt more concentration was needed on sailing and founded the Great Island Sailing Club. That was the motivating force behind the foundation of the Cork Harbour Combined Clubs League, which is in its second pretty successful year.

Cove sailing5Cove Sailing Club’s Commodore Kieran Dorgan launches the centenary programme Photo: Bob Bateman

Positive things can happen from problems and this was the approach taken by Cove Sailing Club’s Commodore Kieran Dorgan when I spoke to him about the future for the club: “Sailing is back, we worked through our difficulties and now we’re driving on.”

"There were once two sailing clubs in the town, then there was one, now there are two again"

The club’s committee view is that “the next few years provide an opportunity to put sailing in Cobh firmly on the map and we plan to work closely with other clubs within the harbour to adapt to the challenges of encouraging new boat ownership and participation in sailing.”

This is the centenary year of Cove SC and the positive approach has been marked by getting planning approval and financial backing for the marina at Whitepoint which had been at the source of its difficulties.

So, when I spoke to Commodore Dorgan for the Podcast, he first recalled that this is not the only time when there have been two sailing clubs in Cobh.

Listen to the podcast below

Published in Tom MacSweeney

Cove Sailing Club launched an exciting centenary programme at Cork Harbour's Sirius centre in Cobh, the former clubhouse of the Royal Cork Yacht Club on Friday, May 17 writes Bob Bateman.

In order to mark the special occasion, CSC Commodore Kieran Dorgan published a 100-year anniversary booklet commemorating the club's important history from 1919 to 2019.

Cove sailing1CSC Commodore Kieran Dorgan launches the centenary season Photo: Bob Bateman

The well attended launch night for the 2019 season –  that included the display of vintage club trophies – got an extra boost with the news that Cork County Council had approved Cove Sailing Club plans to construct a new 25 berth marina located at Whitepoint, Cobh as Afloat previously reported here.

Cove sailing1A vintage 'T' Class One Design dinghy (built 1947) on display outside the Sirius Centre for the Cove Sailing Club centenary launch Photo: Bob Bateman

In cruiser racing news from Cobh, Johanna Murphy, the Commodore of SCORA, who attended the CSC function, told Afloat she is expecting a sizeable south coast fleet of 25 boats to race from Great Island Sailing Club in Cobh to Dunmore East on June 1st, the first time the Cork fleet has sailed east to Waterford in a number of years.

The CSC programme was quickly underway with Saturday's race to Ballincurra as Afloat reports here

Cove sailing1The Cove Sailing Club Committee at the Sirius Centre

Cove sailing1

Cove sailing1Cove sailing1Cove sailing1Cove sailing1Cove sailing1Cove sailing1Cove sailing1Cove sailing1Cove sailing1Cove sailing1Cove sailing1

Published in Cork Harbour

Cove Sailing Club has announced that Cork County Council gave approval on Monday (13 May) to its plans for a new 25-berth marina located at Whitepoint.

Earlier this year saw the display of new plans for the marina, scaled down from a larger scheme that faltered in the planning stages some years ago.

It was reported in the East Cork Journal in March that the new marina plan — touted as a major boost to marine tourism in the Cork Harbour town — would be divided between visitor moorings and club spaces, with a 40m pontoon for ferry sailings to Spike Island.

The club hailed its now green-lit joint venture with the council as “fantastic news for the people of Cobh and the Cork Harbour area” and announced it would be holding meetings in the coming weeks for those interested in a berth or to discuss the project in greater detail.

Cove Sailing Club is also celebrating its centenary this year, and will launch a special yearbook to mark the occasion this Friday evening 17 May from 8pm at the Sirius Arts Centre in Cobh.

Published in Cork Harbour
Tagged under

Cobh may finally get a new marina in what’s being touted as a major boost to marine tourism in the Cork Harbour town, as plans are prepared for public display.

The East Cork Journal has details on the new €450,000 development — scaled down from a larger plan that faltered a number of years ago — which would see 25 berths divided between visitor moorings and club spaces, and a 40-metre pontoon that would serve as a ferry port for access to Spike Island.

Future expansion is also envisaged for the new scheme, a joint venture between Cork County Council and Cove Sailing Club — which last month celebrated its 100th anniversary.

The Cork Harbour institution has since been joined in the area by the new Great Island Sailing Club, established after Cove’s previous marina plans failed to progress and prompted concerns over its pressures on sailing activities.

Published in Aquatic Tourism
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Cork Harbour Information

It’s one of the largest natural harbours in the world – and those living near Cork Harbour insist that it’s also one of the most interesting.

This was the last port of call for the most famous liner in history, the Titanic, but it has been transformed into a centre for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry.

The harbour has been a working port and a strategic defensive hub for centuries, and it has been one of Ireland's major employment hubs since the early 1900s. Traditional heavy industries have waned since the late 20th century, with the likes of the closure of Irish Steel in Haulbowline and shipbuilding at Verolme. It still has major and strategic significance in energy generation, shipping and refining.

Giraffe wander along its shores, from which tens of thousands of men and women left Ireland, most of them never to return. The harbour is home to the oldest yacht club in the world, and to the Irish Navy. 

This deep waterway has also become a vital cog in the Irish economy.

‘Afloat.ie's Cork Harbour page’ is not a history page, nor is it a news focus. It’s simply an exploration of this famous waterway, its colour and its characters.

Cork Harbour Festival

Ocean to City – An Rás Mór and Cork Harbour Open Day formerly existed as two popular one-day events located at different points on Cork’s annual maritime calendar. Both event committees recognised the synergy between the two events and began to work together and share resources. In 2015, Cork Harbour Festival was launched. The festival was shaped on the open day principle, with Ocean to City – An Ras Mór as the flagship event.

Now in its sixth year, the festival has grown from strength to strength. Although the physical 2020 festival was cancelled due to Covid-19, the event normally features nine festival days starting on the first week of June. It is packed full of events; all made possible through collaboration with over 50 different event partners in Cork City, as well as 15 towns and villages along Cork Harbour. The programme grows year by year and highlights Ireland’s rich maritime heritage and culture as well as water and shore-based activities, with Ocean to City – An Rás Mór at the heart of the festival.

Taking place at the centre of Ireland’s maritime paradise, and at the gateway to Ireland’s Ancient East and the Wild Atlantic Way, Cork is perfectly positioned to deliver the largest and most engaging harbour festival in Ireland.

The Cork Harbour Festival Committee includes representatives from Cork City Council, Cork County Council, Port of Cork, UCC MaREI, RCYC, Cobh & Harbour Chamber and Meitheal Mara.

Marinas in Cork Harbour

There are six marinas in Cork Harbour. Three in Crosshaven, one in East Ferry, one in Monkstown Bay and a new facility is opening in 2020 at Cobh. Details below

Port of Cork City Marina

Location – Cork City
Contact – Harbour Masters Dept., Port of Cork Tel: +353 (0)21 4273125 or +353 (0)21 4530466 (out of office hours)

Royal Cork Yacht Club Marina

Location: Crosshaven, Co. Cork
Contact: +353 (0) 21 4831023

Crosshaven Boatyard Marina

Location: Crosshaven, Co. Cork
Contact: +353 (0)21 4831161

Salve Marina Ltd

Location: Crosshaven, Co. Cork
Contact: +353 (0) 21 4831145

Cork Harbour Marina

Location: Monkstown, Co. Cork
Contact: +353 (0)87 3669009

East Ferry Marina

Location: East Ferry, Co. Cork
Contact: +353 (0)21 4813390

New Cove Sailing Club Marina

(to be opened in 2020)

Location: Cobh, Co. Cork
Contact: 087 1178363

Cork Harbour pontoons, slipways and ramps

Cork City Boardwalk Existing pontoon

Port of Cork 100m. pontoon

Cork city – End of Cornmarket St. steps and slip;

Cork city - Proby’s Qy. Existing limited access slip

Quays Bar & Restaurant, Private pontoon and ramp for patrons, suitable for yachts, small craft town and amenities

Cobh harbour [camber] Slip and steps inside quay wall pontoon

Fota (zoo, house, gardens) Derelict pontoon and steps

Haulbowline naval basin; restricted space Naval base; restricted access;

Spike Island pier, steps; slip, pontoon and ramp

Monkstown wooden pier and steps;

Crosshaven town pier, with pontoon & steps

East Ferry Marlogue marina, Slip (Great Island side) visitors’ berths

East Ferry Existing pier and slip; restricted space East Ferry Inn (pub)
(Mainland side)

Blackrock pier and slips

Ballinacurra Quay walls (private)

Aghada pier and slip, pontoon & steps public transport links

Whitegate Slip

Passage West Pontoon

Glenbrook Cross-river ferry

Ringaskiddy Parking with slip and pontoon Ferry terminal; village 1km.

Carrigaloe pier and slip; restricted space; Cross-river ferry;

Fountainstown Slip

White’s Bay beach

Ringabella beach

Glanmire Bridge and tide restrictions

Old Glanmire - Quay

Cork Harbour Festival & Ocean to City Race

Following the cancellation of the 2020 event, Cork Harbour Festival will now take place 5 – 13 June 2021, with the Flagship Ocean to City An Rás Mór on 5 June.

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