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Lecture: “Transatlantic to the Caribbean-the Story of the ARC 2018”

3rd November 2019
Tradewind sailing of the Atlantic Rally for Cruisers (ARC) 2018 Tradewind sailing of the Atlantic Rally for Cruisers (ARC) 2018 Photo: Jeremy Gassman

The next Friends of Glenua lecture to be held on Thursday, 7th November takes place at the Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club, in Ringsend, Dublin.

As previously reported on Afloat the same Dublin venue is where a series of other separate lectures will begin the following week. 

As for the Glenua organised lecture as usual this will be in aid of the RNLI. This second lecture of the winter series is titled: Transatlantic to the Caribbean-the Story of the ARC 2018. This is to be presented by Dolores Murray.

The Atlantic Rally for Cruisers (ARC) is an annual transatlantic sailing event for cruiser yachts, held since 1986. It also includes a sailing competition for racers. The ARC is the largest trans-ocean sailing event in the world and regularly attracts over 200 boats of many different shapes and sizes. More than just a boat race, the ARC is about friendships made ashore in the two weeks of pre-departure activities in the Canaries Island and continued over the radio net at sea and at the various destinations on the way.

In her lecture Dolores will tell the story of how she became involved in the ARC in 2018, the preparations, training, trials and tribulations, and tradewinds, culminating in a successful transatlantic crossing.

Dolores is a sailing instructor who started her sail training in Croatia in 2001 and swiftly moved on to continue her training with GISC (Glenans Irish Sailing School) in 2001. Her sailing experience, prior to taking part in the ARC, was around the south-west coast of Ireland, an annual week in various Mediterranean areas and a delivery trip from Paimpol, Brittany in France to West Cork.

Published in Dublin Bay
Jehan Ashmore

About The Author

Jehan Ashmore

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Jehan Ashmore is a marine correspondent, researcher and photographer, specialising in Irish ports, shipping and the ferry sector serving the UK and directly to mainland Europe. Jehan also occasionally writes a column, 'Maritime' Dalkey for the (Dalkey Community Council Newsletter) in addition to contributing to UK marine periodicals. 

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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore. 

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

 

At A Glance – Dublin Bay

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south

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