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#Rowing: Denis Crowley of Commercial brought his tally of wins to a remarkable six after three days at the World Masters Regatta in Budapest. In just one day, the 57-year-old won in the coxless four and twice in the single sculls – in the C class (43 years or more) and the E class for 55 or more. The decision to form composite crews again paid off for the Irish, with wins in the C eight and the D coxed four, along with Crowley’s haul.

World Masters Regatta, Budapest, (Selected Results, Irish interest, winners)

Friday

Men

Eight

(C – 43 or more): Heat Four: Commercial, Cork, Neptune, Clonmel, Shannon, Galway, Castleconnell (B Crean, B Smyth, R Carroll, O McGrath, G O’Neill, P Fowler, B O’Shaughnessy, K McDonald; cox: M McGlynn) 3:09.75.

Four

(E – 55 or more) Heat Five: Commercial, Neptune, Belfast BC, Galway (D Crowley, G Murphy, C Hunter, A McCallion)

Four, coxed

(D – 50 or more) Heat 3: Galway, Neptune, Castleconnell, Clonmel (G O’Neill, O McGrath, B O’Shaughnessy, T Dunn; cox: M McGlynn) 3:35.89.

Sculling, Single

(C - 43 or more) Heat 19: Commercial (D Crowley) 3:49.92.

(E – 55 or more) Heat 8: Commercial (Crowley)

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: A composite of five crews – Galway, Neptune, Commercial, Clonmel and Cork – won in the men’s eight for 50 and over at the World Masters Regatta in Budapest. It was one of a sequence of wins for the Irish at the huge event.

 Brendan Smyth and Patrick Fowler, rowing for Commercial, won the Pair in the A class, while Denis Crowley and Tony Corcoran won in single sculls.

 Two C fours (43 or more) won and an E coxed four (55 or more) also took the honours.   

World Masters Regatta, Budapest, (Selected Results, Irish interest, winners)

Wednesday

Men

Four, coxed E (55 or more) – Heat Four: 1 Belfast BC, Commercial, Galway, Leichhardt RC (C Hunter, A McCallion, M Heavey, G Canning; cox: JM Marks) 8:05.40

Thursday

Men

Eight (D – 50 or more) – Heat Two: Galway, Neptune, Commercial, Clonmel, Cork (B Crean, B Smyth, R Caroll, O McGrath, G O’Neill, P Fowler, D Crowley, G Murphy; cox: M McGlynn) 3:05.06.

Four (C – 43 or more): Heat Three: Commercial, Galway, Clonmel, Neptune (R Carroll, O McGrath, P Fowler, G O’Neill) 3:15.28. Heat Six: Commercial/Neptune (D Smyth, F O’Toole, G Murphy, D Crowley) 3:15.54.

Pair (A – 27 or more): Heat Three: Commercial (P Fowler, B Smyth) 3:32.68

Sculling, Single – (D – 50 or more) – Heat 15: Commercial (D Crowley) 3:55.15.

(H – 70 or more) – Heat Eight: 1 T Corcoran 4:27.08.

Published in Rowing

The Titanic Hotel in Belfast has been awarded the title of 'Northern Ireland's Leading Hotel 2019' at the World Travel Awards. 

The hotel writes The Belfast Telegraph was given the award at a ceremony in Madeira, Portugal on Sunday evening.

The awards honour excellence within the hotel industry and the standard of service the hotel has demonstrated to visitors throughout the year.

Titanic Hotel’s General Manager Adrian McNally said his team were "thrilled" with the win.

"There are so many great hotels in Northern Ireland now, the standard here is very high, so to win this award means a lot to the staff and team at Titanic Hotel Belfast," he said.

For more on this prestigious travel award click here. 

The above photograph Afloat adds are the Titanic Drawing Offices the oldest part of the former shipyard building that dates from the Victorian era. 

Published in Belfast Lough

Work on building is due to start this month, writes The Irish News, on the north's tallest building, creating over 500 local construction jobs.

The £50 million Belfast City Quays 3 office scheme, granted planning permission in January, will accommodate 1,800 people once complete and represents Belfast Harbour's largest development project to date.

The construction contract for the 16-storey building has been awarded to Dunmurry-headquartered, Farrans and is due for completion by the end of 2021.

The project, designed by Belfast-based architects RPP, will be built to the BREEAM Excellent sustainability standard, placing it in the top 10 per cent of sustainable new buildings in the UK.

The latest portion of the 20-acre City Quays waterfront scheme, which is already home to 1,100 office workers, will bring total investment up to £125m from Belfast Harbour. The development is already home to two Grade A offices a 900-space multi-storey carpark and the AC Marriott Hotel.

For more on this former docklands waterfront development click here. 

Published in Waterfront Property
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#Rowing: Methodist College, Belfast, beat Colaiste Iognaid in a thrilling first final at the Irish Schols’ Regatta at Lough Rinn this morning. The junior 16 boys eight became a battle between the two crews in the final 200 metres, with the Belfast boys finishing well to hold off ‘the Jes’ from Galway. The junior 15 women's eight was won by Coleraine Grammar School, while the women's junior 16 coxed four went to Colaiste Iognaid The windy conditions and choppy water saw the organisers decide to ask the pairs, doubles and singles to hold off on launching, though the programme had started. The University Championships was going ahead, with UCC's women's senior four starting their day with a win, and UCD winning the men's senior four. UCD also took the men's novice eight. Racing was then suspended.
Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Queen’s had a good day at the Lagan Scullers’ Head of the River in Belfast on Saturday. Sam McKeown was the fastest single sculler in the first head, and was most closely matched by three other men from his college club. Queen’s also had the fastest quadruple and double on the day.

Lagan Scullers’ Head, Saturday (Draft Results; selected)

Head One: 1 Queen’s (S McKeown; men’s senior single) 12 mins 15.8, 2 Queen’s (M Taylor, sen single) 12:49.7, 3 Queen’s (R Corrigan) 13:03.9; 5 Enniskillen RBC jun 16 double (T Murphy) 13:12.6, 7 Enniskillen jun 15 coxed quad (D Howe) 13:16.1; 15 Methody (C Purdy; jun 18A single) 14:13.8; 30 Bann (K Shirlow; women’s intermediate single) 15:06.3, 31 Belfast BC jun 18A women’s double (S Gordon) 15:07.8. 60 Coleraine GS (G Lenaghan; women’s jun 15 single) 16:36.6.

Head Two: Queen’s men’s sen quad (M Taylor) 11:01.3; 3 Methody men’s jun 16 quad (T Fleming) 13:08.1; 8 Enniskillen jun 18 double (J Timoney) 14:29.2; 9 Bann (A Christie; inter single) 14:31.1; 16 Belfast BC women’s jun 16 coxed quad 15:05.7; 19 Queen’s (R Smylie; women’s sen single) 15:28.3; 25 Belfast BC (L McCoy; women’s jun 18A single) 16:16.5; 27 Belfast RC (K Foster; men’s club two single) 16:24.8. 34  Carrick on Shannon women’s jun 15 quad 17:07.1. 36 Belfast BC women’s novice double 17:16.0; 42 Enniskillen (L Paton; men’s jun 15 single) 17:35.5. 51 Queen’s (C Hagan; men’s nov single) 18:30.4

Head Three: 1 Queen’s men’s sen double (H Moore) 12:30.4, 2 Enniskillen RBC jun 18A quad (J Timoney) 13:07.8; 7 Belfast BC women’s jun 18A quad (P Mullan) 14:13.3; 10 Methody men’s jun 18B coxed quad (A Waly) 14:31.0; 15 Carrick on Shannon (T Ó Donaile; men’s jun 16 single) 15:41.0, 16 Coleraine GS men’s jun 15 double (O Leitch) 15:41.9, 19 Belfast BC women’s jun 16 double (K Dick) 15:59.8; 40 Lagan Scullers’ women’s jun 15 double (E Darby) 17:04.4.   

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: The Lagan Scullers Head in Belfast saw Michael McNamee of Queen’s University, competing as a senior, set the fastest time for a single sculler. Katie Shirlow of Bann, an intermediate, was the fastest women’s single sculler, with a time of 15 minutes 3.7 seconds.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Portadown had an excellent day at their own regatta, taking the men’s Club One eights final. Bann, who also did very well, took the women’s club two eight. Belfast Rowing Club took the women’s senior quadruple title and UCD the men’s club one coxed quadruple. On a day where the wind became an increasingly important factor, some of the junior 14 and junior 15 events had to be cut.

Portadown Regatta (Selected Results)

Men

Eight – Club One: Portadown bt RBAI 4l. Jun 16: RBAI bt CGS ¾ l. Masters: Neptune (D) bt BRC A (E) easily.

Four – Masters, coxed: Belfast RC B (F) bt Belfast RC (D)

Sculling, Quadruple – Club One, coxed: UCD bt RBAI 5l. Novice, coxed: Newry bt RBAI 4l. Jun 18A: Portadown B bt Portadown A 3l. Jun 16, coxed: Bann bt Portadown 2¼ l.

Double – Club One: Portadown B bt UCD B 2½ l. Jun 18A: Portadown A bt Portadown B 3l. Jun 16: Bann bt Portadown 3l. Masters: City of Derry (D) bt Portadown (E) 1½ l.

Single – Inter: UCD (Earley) bt Portadown (Laivins) 1½ l . Club One: Carrick (Earley) bt Bann (Christie) 1 ft. Nov: City of Derry (Begley) bt RBAI (Gowdy) dist. Jun 18A: Portadown (Hull) bt CGS (Moore) 4l. Jun 16: Portadown (Pinkerton) bt Bann (O’Donovan) 2¼ l. Masters: City of Derry (D’Urso; E) bt Portora (Murphy; E) ½ l.

Women

Eight – Club Two: Bann bt Neptune 1l.

Four – Masters, coxed: BBC (E) bt BRC B (C) 5l.

Sculling, Quadruple – Sen: BRC bt Carrick 6l. Club One, coxed: Portadown bt Belfast BC 6l. Jun 16, coxed: Bann bt Portadown A 5l. Masters: Belfast BC (E) bt Portadown (C) 6l.

Double – Club One: Portadown bt Belfast RC ¾ l. Jun 18: Belfast RC bt Belfast BC 5l. Jun 16: Bann B bt Bann C 3l. Masters: Lagan (C) bt Portadown (C) dist.

Single – Sen: Bann (O’Donovan) bt Portadown (Kells) 6l. Club One: Bann (O’Donovan) bt Portadown (Canniford) dist. Jun 18A: Bann (Carson) bt Carrick-on-Shannon (Duggan) 3 ft. Jun 16: Bann (Breen) bt Neptune (Clarke) dist.

Published in Rowing
Tagged under

#Rowing: Lagan Head of the River in Belfast on Saturday drew a strong representation of clubs from Dublin and Northern Ireland. The Queen’s University novice eight was fastest in the first head, with Trinity intermediates next fastest. Single sculler Hannah Scott of Bann set an excellent time.

 The event had good rowing conditions. It had to contend with competition with the refixed St Michael’s Head at O’Brien’s Bridge.

Lagan Head of the River, Belfast, Saturday (selected results)

Race One

Men

Eight – Novice: Queen’s 10:58.3.

Four – Inter: Trinity (coxed) 11:05.8. Club One, coxed: Methody 11:22.0. Nov, coxed: Queen’s 11:14.0. Jun 18A: Enniskillen 10:44.5. Masters, coxed: Belfast BC/Belfast RC 12:18.0.

Pair – Sen: Queen’s 11:36.5. Jun 18A: Commercial 13:20.2.

Sculling,

 Quadruple – Club One, coxed: CGS 11:24.3. Nov: Queen’s A 12:46.2.  Jun 18A:  Methody B 10:57.9. Jun 16, coxed: Bann 11:21.0.

Double – Sen: Queen’s 11:55.4. Club One: Enniskillen 12:13.3. Jun 18A: Enniskillen 12:31.5. Jun 16: Enniskillen 12:20.5. Masters: Portadown E111 13:09.3.

Single – Senior: Queen’s (C Beck) 11:33.8. Inter: Lagan (W Gilbert) 12:44.6. Club One: Portadown (A Lavins) 12:58.2. Jun 18A: Bann (A Christie) 12:10.8. Masters: Molesey C (R Shirley) 12:37.0.

Women

Eight - Novice: Queen’s A 12:25.7. Jun 15: Enniskillen C 12:21.6.

Four – Club One, coxed: Queen’s 13:17.7. Masters, coxed: Belfast RC 15:42.8.

Pair – Sen: Queen’s C 13:20.2.

Sculling,

Quadruple – Club One, coxed: Portadown 13:49.4. Nov, coxed: Queen’s 13:49.0. Jun 18A: Belfast RC 13:15.4. Jun 16: Bann 12:48.1. Masters: Lagan/Belfast BC 13:47.5.

 Double – Sen: Fermoy/Queen’s 12:23.4. Club One: Queen’s 13:40.8. Jun 18A: Enniskillen B 12:45.2.

Single – Inter: Bann (K Shirlow) 13:46.1. Club One: Methody (R McBrinn) 13:34.1. Jun 18A: Bann (H Scott) 12:40.4.

Race Two

Men

Eight – Senior: Queen’s 14:15.9. Inter: Enniskillen 14:22.3. Club One: Neptune 15:50.3. Jun 18A: Commercial 14:55.2. Masters: Commercial, OCBC, Belfast BC, Neptune 15:29.9.

Four – Sen: Queen’s 16:06.1. Sen, coxed: Belfast RC 16:34.6.

Sculling

Quadruple – Sen: Lagan 15:35.4.

Women

Eight – Inter: Queen’s 17:02.6. Club One: Queen’s B 19.22.8. Jun 18A: Enniskillen 17:02.0. Jun 16: Enniskillen A 18.24.3.

Four – Sen: Belfast BC, Methody 18:25.0. Sen, coxed: Belfast RC 19.50.6.

Sculling

Quadruple – Sen: Bann, Fermoy, Methody, Queen’s 17:17.8.  

Published in Rowing

#MarineWildlife - A seabird usually found in the eastern Mediterranean has not only taken up residence in Belfast – she's successfully hatched her first chick.

The Belfast Telegraph reports on the Mediterranean gull that's been attracting bird watchers from all over Ireland to Belfast's Window on Wildlife nature reserve.

The species, very similar in appearance to the common black-headed gull, is rarely even spotted in Northern Europe, let alone known to breed in these parts.

But it seems mother and child are happy to stay in Northern Ireland's capital and feed on Belfast Lough's bounty of sand eels.

Published in Marine Wildlife
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020