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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Coast Guard

A father and son were rescued today, having being washed overboard from their kayak, thanks to the vigilance of Beach Lifeguards based at Tracht / Kinvarra.

Lifeguards Mark Buckley and Niall Hanley contacted the Coast Guard shortly after 3pm this afternoon when they became concerned about two kayakers who had set out earlier from Tracht beach. Valentia Coast Guard station immediately launched a search operation; tasking Galway Bay RNLI, R115 the Shannon based Coast Guard helicopter, and Doolin Coast Guard unit. Less than one hour after the alert was raised R115 located the casualties. They were then recovered by Galway Bay lifeboat who confirmed that casualties were safe and well.

Coast Guard Watch officers on duty in Valentia were highly complementary of the two local Lifeguards highlighting their vigilance, timeliness of their report and for piecing together information on the casualties. Galway Bay RNLI were also complimented for the successful rescue.

Published in Coastguard
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The Irish Coast Guard co-ordinated a very successful Marine Search and Rescue demonstration yesterday, Saturday 16th July. As Afloat.ie reported previously, the exercise in Moville Co Donegal involved some of Ireland’s principal Search and Rescue resources. Participants included Donegal based volunteer Coast Guard units, the Sligo based Coast Guard Rescue Helicopter, Naval ship LÉ Orla, Air Corps Casa, RNLI’s new Shannon Class All Weather Lifeboat, Bord Iascaigh Mhara, UK Maritime Coastguard Agency, Irish Water Safety, Mountain Rescue Ireland and the Civil Defence.
Speaking after the event Gerard O’Flynn, the Coast Guard’s Search and Rescue Operations Manager said: ‘This exercise afforded the public a wonderful opportunity to see Ireland’s search and rescue resources conducting a series a realistic but challenging tasks, more importantly it enabled the Coast Guard to exercise interoperability between the different assets.”
The event included a series of water based safety demonstrations.
“Prevention and adherence to basic safety is the key element in minimising loss of life at sea and on our waterways”, concluded SARs Manager Gerard O’Flynn.
The main events:
Mud rescue demonstration by nearby members of the Maritime Coastguard Agency, Bay Field in the low water river bed.
The Donegal Mountain Rescue team along with their colleagues in the Civil Defence also at Bay Field displayed their new Drone
Greencastle Coast Guard unit executed a number of cliff rescue displays.
Rescue 115, the Sligo based rescue helicopter along with the crew of LÉ Orla completed a number of winching exercise. From the deck of LÉ Orla and a “wet” lift.
The Air Corps Casa demonstrated the use of airborne life rafts as well as conducting communications exercises with air and surface resources.
Over the course of the day, Volunteer Coast Guard units from Donegal, Mulroy, Killybegs, Greencastle and Bunbeg completed number of rescue manoeuvres including - man over board, swimmer/paddle board in difficult, fishing vessel on fire.

Published in Coastguard
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The Irish Coast Guard, the RNLI and Irish Water Safety advise caution to those engaged in recreational activities in or near water during the current spell of good weather and throughout the summer months.

There has been a significant rise in maritime recreational incidents over the weekend due to the good weather.

At this time of the year as the secondary school term comes to a close and the fine weather is upon us, members of the public are urged to take care when engaging in aquatic activities.

Chief of Operations, Coast Guard Eugene Clonan, said “there has been a noticeable increase in the number of calls over the weekend. Sunday was particularly busy with twenty three calls in response to maritime recreational incidents and he urged members of the public, particularly younger people to exercise caution in and around the water”.

Gareth Morrison RNLI Lifesaving Delivery Manager said, ‘As the weather improves we notice an increase in callouts for our lifeboats. Many of these incidents relate to leisure activities where a nice day out has unfortunately ended in a call for help. Seeking some simple advice before you take to the water or coastline could make all the difference. Our volunteer lifeboat crews are always on call but when every second counts in an emergency you need to be prepared. The RNLI urges everyone to Respect the Water.’

Roger Sweeney, Deputy CEO of Irish Water Safety said that “Ireland averages eleven drownings every month and that constant responsible child supervision will help prevent further tragedies. Parents should check that their local primary school is teaching Irish Water Safety’s classroom based curriculum that instils good habits for a safe summer ahead.”

• The temperature of the sea, lakes, canals and inland water ways is still pretty cold and waters users should exercise caution and be aware of cold water shock and hypothermia.

• Swim with others, never alone, close and parallel to shore.

• If walking on the beach be careful that you are not cut off by the tide. Seek local information about stranding risks.

• Members of the public using recreational craft at the beginning of the season should check the seaworthiness of their craft before launching, particularly engines.

• When departing check the weather forecast, tell someone where you are going and when expected back and wear a life jacket when going afloat.

• For further information on safety on the water check www.safetyonthewater.ie.

• If you see someone in difficulty in the sea, on the shore, cliffs, lakes or rivers dial 999/112 and ask for the Coast Guard.

Published in Marine Warning

Just after midnight (16 February) the UK Coastguard received a Mayday emergency call from a yacht which was in difficulties and had run aground near Skerryvore Light, near the Isle of Tiree off the west coast of Scotland. There was one man on board with no reported injuries.

A Mayday relay was broadcast by the Coastguard requesting assistance and a commercial cable laying vessel made its way to the area and provided some shelter from the weather.

The Islay RNLI all-weather lifeboat was sent and has been on scene attempting to secure a line to the vessel since 3:30am. Barra RNLI Lifeboat has also been sent to assist.

The UK Coastguard search and rescue helicopter based at Prestwick successfully airlifted the yachtsman to safety just after midday. He does not require any medical attention.

UK Coastguard Maritime Operations Controller, Angus MacIver said: 'The winds in the area were gusting at severe gale force with extremely rough seas which created a very testing environment in which this rescue could be carried out. The yachtsman is now being airlifted ashore and the RNLI lifeboats are returning to base.'

Published in Coastguard
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The Shannon based Coast Guard helicopter, R115, evacuated an injured crewman from a Russian vessel, the Armenak Babaev (110metres in length), approximately 150 miles West of Valentia, Co. Kerry last night. The injured man was airlifted at 17.45hrs to Cork Airport for onward transfer to Cork University Hospital for medical attention.

Top Cover communications, which is required for long distance helicopter communications, is being provided by an Air Corps Casa.

The operation is being coordinated by the Coast Guard Rescue Coordination centre in Valentia, who received the request earlier today when the vessel was over 200 miles from the coast. It is understood that the patient suffered burn related injuries in an engine room accident

Published in Coastguard
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The Irish Coast Guard Unit based on the West Pier in Howth Harbour is looking for volunteers. 

The Unit is interviewing to fill trainee positions as Cliff Rescue Climbers, Coastal Search and Boat Crew. No experience is necessary.

All training, certifications, and the required personal equipment is provided. Volunteers are expected to live within minutes of Howth, carry a pager 24/7 to be available for callouts, and attend weekly training.

For more information, email [email protected]

 

Published in Coastguard
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The Shannon Coast Guard helicopter has medevac'ed a Spanish crewman from a trawler 120 nautical miles SSW of Mizen Head, in County Cork, one of the extreme points of the island of Ireland. 

Published in Coastguard

The new HM Coastguard search and rescue helicopter based at St Athan was sent to its first tasking within an hour of going live at the weekend.

Bristow Helicopters Ltd commenced SAR helicopter operations on behalf of HM Coastguard from the St Athan base on Sunday 4 October at 1pm.

Just 47 minutes later the first job came in, when the crew was sent to help a horse rider who had fallen in a forest in West Wales.

The winchman was lowered to the casualty through a gap in the trees and after the road ambulance arrived, they were moved to a nearby field where the aircraft had landed. The casualty was then flown to Cardiff University Hospital.

Just a few hours later, a second mission came through from the UK Coastguard. At 5.30pm, the crew was asked to help search for a 20ft fishing boat that had run aground about three nautical miles from Swansea.

The crew located the boat on Pendine Sands using the aircraft’s infra-red system and the 80 year-old sailor on board was picked up in good health. He was flown to Pembrey Airfield where he was met by Burry Port Coastguard Rescue Team and members of his family.

Ferryside Independent Rescue Boat towed the vessel back to its mooring at Ferryside.

Published in Coastguard
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#currach – The Ballina Quay Regatta fest is making a fantastic return to the quay from June 12th -14th and is set to reignite the nostalgia of years gone by with a spectacular line up featuring All Ireland Currach Racing, boat treasure hunts, fishing competitions, air displays, water skiing and much much more.
The event aims to be a fantastic addition to the already action packed summer calendar in Mayo North and is being presented by the Moy Estuary Boat club, supporting the Ballyglass Lifeboat RNLI service.

After 20 years, the regatta is finally making its grand return and will delight both visitors and locals with an array of magnificient events. Friday night will see a Pirate Treasure Hunt come to the quay, followed by the Rejoice Gospel Choir Concert and the Monarch of the Quay Disco; a perfect introduction to the weekend long entertainment.

The Wild Atlantic Way Discovery Point will host a super adventurous and enjoyable day on Saturday as the Quay will be awash with activity and craic. Stand Up Paddling Board and Kayak races will be taking place all day and there will also be a Fishing Competition in the lead up to the Ceili Mor which will have the entire crowd dancing and jigging as nightime approaches.

On Sunday 14th June, local resident, 92 years young Una Timoney, will cut the ribbon and Mr Chris Reynolds, Director Irish Coast Guard will also officiate at the opening ceremony. This will be followed by Children's Pirate Themed Fancy Dress Parade to the Quay. The Band 2 Brigade will headline on Sunday with an amazing live performace and the final day will also feature a craft fair and a stunning air stunt display, the perfect day out for all the family.

The excitement is surely building, as many of the residents bear fond memories of days gone by and previous regatta festivals in the Quay. Without a doubt, a strong sense of nostalgia surrounds the festival with much anticipation for the return of the regatta, bigger and better than ever before. 4 Team Mixed Relay Swim to Sheaf Throwing, Tug-o-War, and lots more fun and games, the programme of events for the weekend is certainly an impressive one. 

Published in Coastal Rowing

#coastguard – Holyhead Coastguard Operations Centre (CGOC) is to become part of the new Coastguard national network for the very first time this week.

Work has been carried out at the search and rescue coordination centre to upgrade the technology and introduce new systems. This means Holyhead CGOC will be connected to the National Maritime Operations Centre (NMOC) in Hampshire and other Coastguard stations around the country, which will be able to offer mutual support during busy periods.

From January 2015, Holyhead CGOC and the new national network will start to take on operations from Liverpool Coastguard.

The changes to Her Majesty's Coastguard will see the NMOC and 10 other CGOCs around the UK work together to manage the workload. There will be no reduction in rescue resources. The availability of Coastguard Rescue Teams, lifeboats, rescue helicopters and other rescue units will be unaffected.

Graham Clark, Maritime Operations Controller at Holyhead CGOC, said:

"The way we deliver the coordination of search and rescue operations on our coast and out at sea is changing. But the public won't notice any difference. If you call 999 and ask for the Coastguard, or issue a mayday broadcast, we will still be here to help you.

"The new national Coastguard network will be able to oversee and assist with operations around the whole of the UK. Here at Holyhead CGOC we're now part of this network, so we can call upon help from our fellow Coastguards elsewhere in the country, and also in turn help them out if needed.

"It's vital to remember though that the rescue teams in your community are unaffected. There will still be the same number of lifeboats, Coastguard Rescue Teams, helicopters and other rescue resources."

The new national network is scheduled to be fully operational by the end of 2015.

Published in Coastguard
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020