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Displaying items by tag: De Guingand Bowl Race

The fifth race of the RORC Season’s Points Championship is the De Guingand Bowl Race, scheduled to start at 09:30 BST on Saturday 14th May to the west, from the Royal Yacht Squadron Line, Cowes. The course for the overnight race of 110-160nm will be announced prior to the start. 57 teams have entered, racing under IRC, MOCRA and Class40 rules.

Crew come from at least nine different countries including: Australia, Belgium, France, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the United States.

Antoine Magre’s French Class40 Palanad 3Antoine Magre’s French Class40 Palanad 3 © Carlo Borlenghi

Four teams can be counted as favourites for Monohull Race Line Honours, the highest rated boat under IRC is Ross Hobson & Adrian Banks’ British Open 50 Pegasus of Northumberland . Antoine Magre’s French Class40 Palanad 3, winner of the 2021 RORC Transatlantic Race, will also be racing. Both teams have entered the 2022 Sevenstar Round Britain & Ireland Race. In contention to be the first monohull to finish the De Guingand Bowl Race is RORC Commodore James Neville with British HH42 INO XXX, which took the gun and the overall win for the 2022 Cervantes Trophy Race. New to RORC Racing will be Michael Møllmann’s all-composite Danish Elliott 35SS Palby Marine, sailed by Sofus Pedersen. Ultimate Sailing’s British Multi50 Spirit of Poole, sailed by Robert Langford-Wood, is currently the sole entry in MOCRA and will be taking part in its first race since undergoing a four-month refit.

Michael O’Donnell's J/121 DarkwoodMichael O’Donnell's J/121 Darkwood Photo: RORC

Thirteen teams are entered for IRC One including Ireland’s Michael O’Donnell racing his J/121 Darkwood, which was second overall for the Cervantes Trophy Race. The class contains a number of charter boats with passionate amateur crew including six First 40s: Skylander skippered by Jordan Billiald, Galahad of Cowes skippered by Ronan Banim, Lancelot II skippered by David Thomson, Arthur skippered by Jim Bennett. Two teams from the London Corinthian Sailing Club, will be starting their 2023 Rolex Fastnet Campaign racing Tango and Jazz. Overseas teams in the class include Benedikt Clauberg’s Swiss Ocean Racing Club with First 47.7 Kai and Laurent Charmy’s French J/111 SL Energies_Groupe Fastwave.

IRC Two-Handed is the largest class for the De Guingand Bowl Race with 30 expected to be racing. The two leading teams for the 2022 season will be in action. Richard Palmer will be racing his JPK 1010 Jangada with Rupert Holmes and Sunfast 3200 Cora will be raced by Tim Goodhew & Kelvin Matthews. Twelve Sun Fast 3300s will be racing in IRC Two-Handed, including a RORC debut for Red Ruby sailed by partners Christina & Justin Wolfe from Washington USA. Wayne Palmer will also be racing his J/99 Jam for the first time, racing in IRC Two-Handed with Mark Emons. Stuart Greenfield will be racing his S&S 34 Morning After with Louise Clayton.

Twenty entries have been received by teams racing in IRC 2, the majority of which will be racing in IRC Two-Handed. Fully crewed entries in IRC Two include the well-sailed Sun Fast 3600, the Army Sailing Association’s Fujitsu British Soldier, skippered by Philip Caswell, which was class winner for the Cervantes Trophy Race. Freya Anderson & Adam Leddy will be racing Gavin Howe’s 1987 Julian Everitt designed 35ft sloop Wavetrain.

Harry Heijst’s S&S 41 WinsomeHarry Heijst’s S&S 41 Winsome Photo: RORC

In IRC Three, the Royal Navy Sailing Association’s J/109 Jolly Jack Tar, skippered by Henry Wilson, the Royal Air Force Sailing Association’s J/109 Red Arrow, skippered by Gillian Burgess. Harry Heijst’s S&S 41 Winsome is entered with a majority Dutch crew. French Franck Ribot’s JPK 1010 Whisper returns to RORC racing with an all-French team. In IRC Four, Christophe Declercq will be racing Contessa 32 Lecas with a team from Belgium.

The overall winner of the race after IRC time correction will be presented with the De Guingand Bowl, which was presented to the Royal Ocean Racing Club by E.P. de Guingand, affectionally known as ‘Buster’ (Vice Commodore 1957-1959). The best vantage points of the start will be along Cowes Green and Egypt Esplanade. Competing boats can be tracked using AIS data, when in range, via the YB tracker player here 

RORC Cowes ClubhouseAll competitors, family and friends are welcome to the RORC Cowes Clubhouse. Photo: RORC/Paul Wyeth

The De Guingand Bowl Race is part of the 2022 RORC Season’s Points Championship, the world's largest offshore racing series comprising of 16 testing races. Every race had its own coveted prize for the overall winner and famous trophies for IRC class honours.

Published in RORC

The Royal Ocean Racing Club’s (RORC) De Guingand Bowl Race started in light conditions, with the wind speed increasing later in the race to about 15 knots and veering south.

The top three boats overall were all racing in IRC Four. The overall winner was Jonathan Rolls’ classic S&S Swan 38 Xara.

Second overall was Chris Choules Sigma 38 With Alacrity. French JPK 10.10 Gioia, sailed by Etienne Pinteaux, was third.

In IRC Zero, David Collins Botin IRC 52 Tala took Line Honours for the race. 

Jonathan Rolls’ classic S&S Swan 38 Xara © Paul WyethJonathan Rolls’ classic S&S Swan 38 Xara © Paul Wyeth

“It was a funny old race, and I am sure the crew are very pleased, I think we are a bit lucky really,” commented Xara’s Jonathan Rolls. “We didn’t do anything particularly special to be honest. It was good fun, we are a bit knackered, but it seems that the conditions really suited Xara. I suspect we surprised one or two of the better boats. We are old fashioned amateurs, very definitely not professional, The crew are all family and friends, Tom (Rolls) is the navigator, and very good at it.”

Xara has a long history in the Fastnet Race, including surviving the tragic 1979 edition. In recent years, under the ownership of Jonathan Rolls, Xara has achieved the distinction of achieving Best Swan Overall in the 2017 and 2019 Rolex Fastnet Race.

“We intend to race with the RORC to St. Malo this July, and then the Fastnet this August. I am an ancient gentleman, but the crew look after the old man. For this race, I think that luck played its part, giving us fair winds and following seas.”

A light north easterly breeze freshened as the fleet passed PortsmouthA light north easterly breeze freshened as the fleet passed Portsmouth Photo: Paul Wyeth

The 114nm race started off the Squadron Line to the east on a favourable tide. A light north easterly breeze freshened as the fleet passed Portsmouth. Teams eased sails as they bore away south into the English Channel, where a cross-tide came into the strategy. Once past a virtual line of latitude, the RORC fleet hardened up for a 30 mile beat to Shoreham Outfall. A downwind leg back towards the Solent, following the setting sun, was followed by a manoeuvre-testing chicane, before finishing in the Solent at Mother Bank.

Full Results here

IRC ONE
Ed Fishwick’s GP42 Redshift took line honours and the class win from Rob Bottomley’s Mat 12 Sailplane. David Cummins’ Ker 39 Rumbleflurg, sailed by Harry Bradley, was just 77 seconds behind Sailplane after IRC time correction.

IRC TWO
Ross Applebey’s Oyster 48 Scarlet Oyster was the class winner by just over three minutes after IRC time correction. The current overall leader for the RORC Season’s Points Championship, Thomas Kneen’s JPK 1180 Sunrise, was second in class. Ed Bell’s JPK 1180 Dawn Treader was third in class for the race. Capstan Sailing’s Skylander, skippered by Yuri Fadeev, won the battle of the First 40s, and placed fourth in class.

IRC THREE
James Harayda’s Sun Fast 3300 Gentoo, racing Two-Handed with Dee Caffari, was the class winner. Second was the full crew of the Army Sailing Association, racing Sun Fast 3600 Fujitsu British Soldier and skippered by Henry Foster. Rob Craigie’s Sun Fast 3600 Bellino, racing Two-Handed with Deb Fish, was third.

IRC TWO-HANDED
20 teams entered racing in IRC Two-Handed, the majority racing in IRC Three and Four. Richard Palmer’s JPK 10.10 Jangada chalked up another narrow victory. Sailing with Jeremy Waitt, Jangada beat Gentoo by 83 seconds after IRC time correction. Bellino was third. All three of these teams have now completed three races in the RORC Season’s Points Championship, with less than 19 points separating them.

Published in RORC

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020