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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Revenue Commissioners

The Revenue Commissioners will prepare guidance material for their website and update relevant tax and duty manuals in advance of the upcoming ban on the use of green diesel for private pleasure craft, it is understood.

That’s according to the latest Marine Notice from the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport which reminds boaters that the use of marked gas fuel as a propellant by private pleasure craft will be prohibited from 1 January 2020.

However, as reported earlier this week, oil suppliers at ports around Ireland’s coast have yet to be formally updated as to what changes are required under the new legislation. Afloat.ie has more on the story HERE.

Published in Cruising

#SeizedShip – A Moldovan flagged cargoship seized with €14m worth of tobacco by the Revenue Commissioners three years ago still remains detained in Dublin Port but plans are in place to finally dispose the vessel. 

The 667 tonnes Shingle had loaded 32m cigarettes and 4,000kg of water pipe tobacco in Slovenia and from there arrived to Drogheda Port in June 2014 via Lisbon, Portugal. At the time of the recovery it was the biggest seizure of cigarettes so far in Europe that year. The operation had targeted an international crime gang led by Irish and UK nationals based also in Europe.

Afloat can confirm the latest status of the seized cargoship following a response from the Revenue Commissioners which commented the ‘High Court last month made an Order for the forfeiture of the MV Shingle. There was no appeal within the specified period and the vessel can now be disposed of. Following consideration of disposal options, appropriate disposal arrangements will be made in due course’.

The customs seizure operation had involved not just the Revenue Commissioners but months of work and co-operation from law enforcement agencies in Solvenia and Portugal. This led to the Shingle boarded in the Irish Sea by Customs officers backed by the Gardaí.

The Shingle was escorted by Revenue Customs Cutters Suirbheir and sister Faire to Drogheda. Due to the sheer scale of the seizure for logistical reasons it was decided to transfer the 1982 built cargoship from the Louth port to the capital. Again this passage required the cutters to accompany the vessel.

Initially the Shingle in Dublin Port was allocated a berth within Alexandra Basin along Ocean Pier to where an intensive examination of the illegal contraband took place. Following the customs seizure, the Paris MoU, an international organisation whose mission is to eliminate the operation of sub-standard ships through Port State Control detained the cargoship. 

The Shingle shifted berths to the North Wall Quay Extension. This is where for the last three years the small ship has occupied a prominent berth given its close proximity to passing commuters using the Tom Clarke (East-Link) toll bridge.

Published in Dublin Port
In a third attempt to load two former Aran Islands ferries at Galway yesterday, operations took on a new twist as the cargoship chartered in to transport them was detained according to a report in todays Irish Times.
The Thor Gitta, a 4078 tonnes heavy lift cargoship was held at the port's Dun Aengus Dock as new complications arose in an effort to transport the two passenger fast-ferries Clann na nOileáin and Clann Eagle 1 which are bound for Mauritius in the Indian Ocean.

Harbourmaster Capt. Brian Sheridan, confirmed yesterday evening that the Danish flagged vessel had been detained at lunchtime on the instructions of the admiralty marshal, a High Court judge, acting under maritime law. Until matters are resolved, a ship's keeper has been placed onboard by the Revenue Commissioners.

Published in Ports & Shipping
A new fisheries protection vessel (FPV) for Northern Ireland was commissioned in a ceremony presided by the fisheries Minister Michelle Gildernew MP, MLA in Bangor Harbour on Thursday, writes Jehan Ashmore.
The Banríon Uladh which cost £2.2m (with 50% funding from the EU) has replaced the smaller sized vessel, Ken Vickers, which has been in service since 1992. The new 26-metre craft is based in the Co. Down harbour and is crewed by fisheries officers from Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD).

The FPV was built by AS Baltic Workboats in Estonia and the 25 knot plus craft has already entered on operational duties as part of the Joint Deployment Plan with the Irish Naval Service to underpin fishery protection arrangements.

Layout of the vessel superstructure consists of the wheelhouse for a crew of three and provisional space for two observers. At the aft end there is a wet laboratory for scientific and data collecting purposes. On the lower deck the vessel can accommodate seven crew members in three twin cabins and a single cabin for the captain. Other facilities are the mess, galley and WC.

An onboard RIB, powered by twin 60hp outboards is located aft in the stern-well. Also located at the stern is a two ton capacity movable hydraulic gantry and a one ton Guerra marine deck crane. To create more deck-space for scientific research operations, the stern-well can be covered over with boards, a similar design feature is found on the Revenue Commissioners two Finish built custom cutters RCC Suirbheir and RCC Faire.

In addition to fishery protection, the craft is designed for seabed mapping, survey equipment technology to inspect inshore mussel resources for the
aquaculture industry and to detect pollutants. The ability to conduct such functions will enable greater assistance and understanding of the marine environment for DARD's science partners at the Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute (AFBI).

The design of the Banrion Uladh is based on Baltic Workboats 24m Baltic 2400 class which has been operating for clients in Estonia, Latvia and Poland. In addition the same class is also to be used as a basis for boats which are under construction for the Swedish Coast Guard.

Published in Fishing
The Revenue Commissioners have published updated guidelines for the excise duty payable on green diesel used by private boatowners in Ireland.
The update accounts for the changes earlier this year to Mineral Oil Tax rate due to the imposition of the  carbon charge, as well as the recent Budget increase.
The rate from 1 January to 30 April 2010 stands at €0.40182 per litre, from 1 May to 7 December 2010 at €0.36052 per litre - reflecting the new separate carbon tax - and from 8 to 31 December 2010 at €0.37704 per litre.
The new guide and tax return form can be downloaded as a PDF file HERE.

The Revenue Commissioners have published updated guidelines for the excise duty payable on green diesel used by private boatowners in Ireland.

The update accounts for the changes earlier this year to Mineral Oil Tax rate due to the imposition of the carbon charge, as well as the recent Budget increase. 

The rate from 1 January to 30 April 2010 stands at €0.40182 per litre, from 1 May to 7 December 2010 at €0.36052 per litre - reflecting the new separate carbon tax - and from 8 to 31 December 2010 at €0.37704 per litre.

The new guide and tax return form can be downloaded as a PDF file HERE.

Published in News Update

The second series of 'Customs' returns to television screens next Wednesday (17 November) on RTÉ One at 8.30pm. The Revenue Commissioners customs cutter, RCC Faire, which officially entered service in October of last year, will feature in the new series.

RCC_Faire

RCC Faire at Howth Harbour on the day of her naming ceremony on 16 October 2009. Photo: Jehan Ashmore / ShipSNAPS

To be broadcast in six-parts, the series will provide unprecedented access into the daily operations of the custom officers.'Customs' examines how the country is dealing with increasing levels of illegally imported materials and substances.

Custom officers found shipments of drugs in the strangest places: a doll's house, picture frames, the bottom of a massive cargo ship. In addition the seizure of contraband cigarettes, vehicles, large
quantities of money and the more bizarre discovery of a Colombian snake.

Published in Maritime TV
The second series of 'Customs' returns to television screens next Wednesday (17 November) on RTÉ One at 8.30pm. The series will also feature the Revenue Commissioners customs cutter, RCC Faire, which officially entered service in October of last year.

To be broadcast in six-parts, the series will provide unprecedented access into the daily operations of the custom officers.'Customs' examines how the country is dealing with increasing levels of illegally imported materials and substances.

Custom officers found shipments of drugs in the strangest places: a doll's house,picture frames, the bottom of a massive cargo ship. In addition the seizure of contraband cigarettes, vehicles, large quantities of money and the more bizarre discovery of a Colombian snake.

Published in Maritime TV

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020