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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Search and Rescue

#Search - RTÉ News reports on an ongoing search and rescue operation on Lough Ree this evening (20 March) as two men have been recovered from the water as RNLI lifeboat and Air Corps teams look for a third.

It's believed that the party of three are from Northern Ireland and may have got into difficulty in their boat close to Hodson Bay, near Athlone. One of the two rescued is said to be seriously ill, and both are being treated in hospital.

More on this story as it develops.

Published in Rescue

#Search&Rescue - Surfers haven't been the only ones benefitting from the recent stormy weather, as RTÉ News reports on a Cork-based boat builder that's been testing its top models in the wild Atlantic swell.

Youghal-based search-and-rescue (SAR) and pilot boat builder Safehaven Marine took its SAR vessels based at Roche's Point in Cork Harbour to the limit during sea trials earlier this week. Click HERE to see video of the sea trials in action

It follows similar trials of the company's pilot boat Interceptor 48 late last month as conditions turned for the worse off the Cork coast.

In waves reaching heights of 20 metres and winds breaking the 100km/h mark, the boats were tested in the extreme this week, but it was more than necessary for the hard work they'll be put through in service.

RTÉ News has more on the story HERE.

Published in Rescue

#Missing - The search was set to resume this morning for a man who fell into the sea off Co Clare yesterday afternoon (15 December).

As The Irish Times reports, the missing man, a Latvian national, is one of two anglers who has been fishing from rocks near Blackhead, on the south side of Galway Bay.

It's believed the second man left the scene to get help when his colleague went into the water, and could no longer find him on his return.

It's also thought the Latvian national could have been in the water for several hours before emergency services were alerted.

Doolin coastguard, Aran Islands RNLI and the Shannon-based coastguard helicopter were all dispatched for the search and rescue operation, which was called off at 6pm in poor light.

Published in News Update

#Coastguard - It was the end of an era yesterday (10 December) as the last remaining Sikorsky S61 search and rescue (SAR) helicopter in the Irish Coast Guard fleet stood its final SAR watch since services began in 1991 and was retired from active service.

According to the IRCG, the last stand by 'Alpha Romeo' was possibly the last ever watch by the world's oldest SAR S61, going on an impressive 52 years since its manufacture.

From today the chopper will be replaced by one of the new Sikorsky S92 aircraft, which as previously reported on Afloat.ie are currently being trialled as an air ambulance service, set to expand from Galway to Dublin in the coming weeks.

Published in Coastguard

#Rescue - Two coastguard units, the Portrush lifeboat and a Royal Navy helicopter from Scotland were involved in the rescue of a woman who had fallen 50 feet off a cliff on the Causeway Coast at the weekend.

As the Belfast Telegraph reports, the woman, believed to be in her 20s, had been walking along the top of the cliff between Ballycastle and Ballintoy in Co Antrim in the early hours of Saturday morning when she apparently slipped and fell.

Search and rescue teams jumped into action when a car was spotted near Carrick-a-rede rope bridge some hours later, and the woman as located at the base of a nearby cliff below Portaneevy Viewpoint just after 9am.

The woman has sustained multiple injuries and was suffering the effects of shock and hypothermia, but was successfully airlifted to Causeway Hospital in Coleraine where her condition was described yesterday as stable.

The Belfast Telegraph has more on the story HERE.

Published in Rescue

#MCIB - Various factors - including poor buoyancy, suboptimal lifejackets and a fateful late decision to swim to shore - have been identified in the official report into the death of a fisherman off the Waterford coast earlier this year.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, a major search and rescue operation was launched on 10 January when a 16-foot fishing punt capsized in a strong swell at the sandbar off Brownstown Head near Dunmore East, throwing its two-man crew overboard.

James Tate was able to swim to the nearby shore in the early morning darkness after some two hours in the water. But he became separated from his friend Johnny Flynn - a former member of the Dunmore East lifeboat crew - who was found unconscious in the water by coastguard helicopter before 8.30am.

Flynn was pronounced dead at Waterford Airport shortly after, with a post-mortem concluding that he cause of death was drowning.

The tragedy occurred six years to the day after the sinking of Dunmore East trawler the Pere Charles, which took five lives.

In the official report into the incident, the Marine Casualty Investigation Board (MCIB) found that the fishing punt, already vulnerable to breaking waves as an un-decked open boat, was more susceptible due to its waterlogged condition, and the lack of adequate buoyancy.

It was also found that neither the vessel's handheld VHF radio nor GPS device, or indeed Tate's mobile phone, were available to the pair after the boat turned turtle.

Though both men were wearing lifejackets, they were of a kind that lacked a collar that would have kept the deceased's head above water, nor did they have a light or whistle. Only Tate was equipped with any kind of light, so he could not locate his friend in the dark.

Most importantly, it was found that the boat had overturned within 100 metres of the shallows, so that if the pair had attempted to swim to shore earlier - rather than tire themselves out trying to climb onto the upturned hull - the chances of both men surviving the incident "would have been greatly enhanced".

The full report into the incident is available to download below.

Published in MCIB

#Coastguard - Last weekend 8-9 June was the Irish Coast Guard's busiest since 1991 for search and rescue indigents, as reported yesterday on Afloat.ie.

Today's Irish Examiner goes deeper into the figures, which show more than 53 coastguard search and rescue incidents took place around the country last Saturday and Sunday - ranging from missing persons to swimmers in difficulty, vessels broken down, missing children, personal watercraft and speedboats operating in a hazardous way and urgent medical evacuations. 

In addition, the Irish Coast Guard's rescue helicopter fleet – not including any of the other IRCG units – was tasked a massive 18 times over the weekend alone.

The fleet was this week bolstered by the arrival of two Sikorsky S-92s previously flown by the British Coastguard.

Set to operate from Shannon, the choppers join the state-of-the-art Rescue 115 which has been operational since last year, and was last week on course to conduct the Irish Coast Guard's longest range mission ever.

Published in Coastguard

#Coastguard - The Irish Coast Guard (IRCG) has launched its new 'Stay Safe on the Water' TV advertising campaign aimed at families, leisure users and the fishing industry during the busy summer months. 

This is the coastguard’s first TV advertisement, having its premiere on RTÉ One television this evening after 6pm. 

The IRCG was motivated to launch its first TV water safety campaign following the success of the Road Safety Authority (RSA) TV campaigns. The new 20-second adverts will run from now until the end of August.

Coastguard statistics have recorded 11 deaths by drowning in Irish waters so far this year, and last weekend was the Irish Coast Guard's busiest since 1991 for search and rescue incidents. 

Speaking at the launch, IRCG manager Declan Geogheghan said: “This summer we began our 2013 safety awareness campaign in May and we want to strongly get across the safety message to families, leisure users and the fishing industry about going out on the water.  

"We want everyone to enjoy the outdoors this summer weather but remember to heed our advice to ensure that you and your family and friends stay safe.”

Last Saturday and Sunday saw more than 53 coastguard search and rescue incidents taking place around the country. Of these, 21 were co-ordinated by the Dublin Marine Rescue Co-ordination Centre (MRCC), 18 by Valentia MRCC and 14 by Malin MRCC.

These incidents ranged from missing persons, swimmers in difficulty, vessels broken down, missing children, personal watercraft and speedboats operating in a hazardous way and urgent medical evacuations. 

Coastguard helicopters alone – not including any of the other IRCG Units – were tasked a massive 18 times over the weekend.

“The pleasant, warm weather brings thousands of people to our coastlines, to our beaches and the outdoors," said Geoghegan. "We want everyone to enjoy the outdoors but to remember to take simple, basic advice about staying safe on the water and along cliff paths, when hill walking and enjoying the outdoors. 

"Time and again, we see people ignoring basic safety advice, taking risks and then getting into difficulty, sometimes leading to loss of life. The coastguard is a 24/7 service but we must again advise caution as too many people are taking risks and ignoring our advice.

For specific advice and information on any water and coastal activity, visit www.safetyonthewater.ie.

Throughout the summer, as at other times of the year, Irish Coast Guard units throughout Ireland will patrol our waterways and coastlines issuing safety advice and information to holidaymakers, tourists and marine users.

The following are general safety tips and advice from the IRCG to help enjoy the water and coastal activities in your area this weekend and throughout the summer:

Swimming

Only swim at beaches and waterways that have lifeguards on duty and pay attention to the safety flags. Ask the lifeguard for advice about safety and water conditions and adhere to their instructions. Avoid using inflatable toys, such as li-los and rubber rings, on the water.

Cliff Walking

There is safety in numbers, so never be alone if possible. Let somebody know when and where you are going and what time you will be back. Stay well away from the cliff edge, both top and bottom. Don’t attempt to rescue people or pets if they fall over the edge. If assistance is required dial 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.

Water Sports and Coastal Activities

Before going to sea check local weather conditions and tides in the area. Wear correctly maintained and fitting lifejackets that are suitable for the activity. Lifejackets are of no use unless they are worn. Ensure your craft is fit for purpose. Always advise someone as to where you are going and the time of your intended return. Do not overload the craft. If you are in difficulty or see someone in difficulty and requiring assistance dial 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.

Finally, under no circumstances should anyone ever engage in water activities under the influence of alcohol.

Published in Coastguard

#News - UTV News reports that a body recovered from the River Foyle on Thursday 9 May is that of missing Dublin teenager Kieran McKeon.

The 18-year-old was reported missing two months ago along with a friend, 21-year-old Alexandra O'Brien, whose body was found in the water close to Foyle Bridge in Derry on 14 March, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

It's thought that the two took their own lives in a suicide pact, after eyewitness reports described two people falling into the river from the bridge.

Personal items said to belong to O'Brien and McKeon were found on the bridge which sparked off the search operation led by Foyle Search and Rescue, which had continued every evening since at low tide, with a full search once a week.

UTV News has more on the story HERE.

Published in News Update

#Coastguard - The Irish Coast Guard may lead open-sea searches for American space bosses when manned space flights resume, according to the Irish Examiner.

Coastguard chiefs have reportedly been in informal discussions with a senior official from Nasa regarding search and rescue procedures should a manned capsule come down in the North Atlantic.

Nasa's planned launch trajectory for rockets to the ISS or the moon, scheduled to resume in 2016, passes the south coast of Ireland within range of the new Shannon-based helicopter Rescue 115.

This means that if a Nasa vehicle were to ditch in those waters, the Irish Coast Guard would take the lead in any search and rescue effort.

The Irish Examiner has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastguard
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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