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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: USS Fort McHenry

#PORTS & SHIPPING REVIEW - Over the last fortnight Jehan Ashmore has reported from the Shipping scene where after the Irish Navy's role in the Tallships 'Parade of Sail', the inaugural Irish Sea Tall Ships Race finally got underway to Liverpool.

Also making a call to Dublin Port was cruise newcomer Plantour & Partners's whose small cruiseship Hamburg made her debut visit to the capital port.

The following day saw the classic cruiseship veteran Princess Daphne call, she was launched originally as a general cargo-ship serving the UK-Australia and New Zealand trade routes. In the same week her sister Princess Danae was arrested in Dublin Port,  for an alleged non-payment of fuel bills. The dispute was eventually settled which saw the H&W built vessel depart for La Rochelle.

Operating profits at Irish Ferries of €3.2m for the first six months of 2012, remained the same compared to the same period last year, according to its parent company ICG which released its financial interim report.

A special call by the USS Fort McHenry (LSD-43), a dock landing ship to Dublin Port was made to coincide with American Football Week which allowed her crew to attend the Emerald Isle Classic showdown between the Navy and Notre Dame. On a related note US students where making their 'Semester at Sea' cruise on board Explorer which had called to Galway Bay and later the capital.

With the US Navy in Dublin, the rebel county had its own rare visit of the Russian Navy, when the destroyer Vice-Admiral Kulakov (626) called to Cobh. On both occasions the public were able to board.

Glasgow based Waverley Excursions have been running several unusual route excursions out of Northern Ireland. The final excursion was scheduled for today with a day-trip between Portaferry, Co. Down and Peel on the west coast of the Isle of Man.

While on waters off the east coast of the Irish Sea's largest island, proposals for an extended wind-farm will not require re-routing of shipping lanes according to developer Dong Energy. They operate the Walney Island wind-farm off Cumbria.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#RUSSIAN NAVY - While Dublin Port was visited by USS Fort McHenry (LSD-43) over the last week, the Russian Navy's Vice-Admiral Kulakov (626) paid a courtesy call to Cork Harbour, berthing at Cobh, normally associated with frequent cruise callers, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The imposing Udaloy anti-submarine destroyer berthed alongside Cobh's deepwater quay last week, where the public had rare access to board the 162m destroyer commissioned in 1982.

Later this month the Cork Harbour Open Weekend (15-16th Sept) as previously reported on Afloat.ie will offer two-days of fun filled activities for all ages, with events and activities for all, both on and off the water.

Published in Naval Visits

#US NAVYSHIP DEPARTS – At lunchtime the United States Navy dock-landing ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD-43) departed Dublin Port, after her visit for American Football Week, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Waiting out in Dublin Bay was the Irish Naval Service 'flagship' L.E. Eithne (P31) which had gone to anchorage having also stayed in the capital concurrently to the naval visitor. As USS Fort McHenry headed out on an easterly direction L.E. Eithne got underway too and proceeded southbound.

Other shipping activity in the bay included Seatruck Ferries newbuild freight-only ferry, Seatruck Progress, the ro-ro vessel serves on the Dublin-Liverpool route. Also at anchorage was Broström Tankers coastal tanker Bro Genius (2003/4,107grt).

Further out in the bay at the North Burford Buoy was Dublin Port Company's multi-cat Rosbeg, the workboat tender craft performs a wide variety of duties inside and outside the port, from cleaning the river to quay maintenance, bed levelling and buoy-handling.

Closer to shore, nearer to Dun Laoghaire Harbour was the cutter Cosantoir Bradan (meaning Salmon Defender) which as previously reported is on charter from the Central Fisheries Board to the Geological Survey of Ireland (GSI). They are using the cutter in conjunction with their RV Keary for survey work, including bottom surveying.

RV Keary attended the Dublin Tall Ships Races Festival, where she was moored in Grand Canal Dock which was also occupied by a fleet of narrowboats moored at the marina of the Waterways Visitor Centre.

Published in Dublin Bay

#SEMESTER SHIP – Having made a recent visit to Galway, the cruiseship Explorer with more than 800 students, academics and crew are on board, as previously reported on Afloat.ie, is currently heading to the opposite side of the island, with a visit to Dublin Port, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 25,000 tonnes vessel with its floating campus is due to dock in the capital tomorrow morning at Ocean Pier. The 180m vessel, formerly the Olympic Explorer built in 2000 for Royal Olympic Cruises is currently providing a "semester at sea" (SAS) programme through a world tour.

The SAS is operated on a not-for-profit initiative for the Institute for Shipboard Education, in co-operation with the University of Virginia in the US. Students taking the educational programme had set off on the world voyage from Halifax, Nova Scotia, with the first leg to Galway.

When Explorer berths in Dublin Port, she will join the United States Navy landing ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD-43) which as previously reported on Afloat.ie had already arrived last Thursday for the American Football Week.

It was downriver from her Ocean Pier berth at the nearby O2 Arena, where last night's televised "The Gathering: Notre Dame- A Welcome Home" , a special concert which was held for fans in the Docklands venue.

Today the Emerald Isle Classic with 33,000 fans of the games two big boys, Notre Dame and the Navy, is been held this afternoon, on the far side of the Liffey at the Aviva Stadium.

After her two-day call to Dublin the Explorer continues on its global tour with calls to the UK, Belgium, Portugal, Spain, Morocco, Ghana, South Africa, Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil and Dominica.

Published in Cruise Liners

#USS NAVY VISIT - The United States Navy landing-ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD-43) is to make a courtesy call to Dublin Port tomorrow, and remain for the next 11 days, so to include American Football Week, writes Jehan Ashmore.

She is scheduled to dock at Ocean Pier, berth 33, where the vessel will be available for public tours organised through a lottery held next weekend (1-2 September). To register for the tours, follow this visit: http://dublin.usembassy.gov/uss-fort-mchenry.html

To see more information about USS Fort McHenry, www.fort-mchenry.navy.mil/

The United States Naval Academy will host the University of Notre Dame this September 1st in their annual NCAA fixture. For only the second time since this great fixture started in 1927, the game will be played outside the United States, with Ireland's Aviva Stadium staging the match.

The response from the Irish and American public has been exceptional with tickets selling out almost six months ahead of the game. Over 30,000 US patrons will travel to Dublin for this game, making it one the biggest international sporting events to be staged in Ireland in 2012.

For a list of events around the game click HERE.

The visit of USS Fort McHenry, is similar to that of the aircraft carrier, USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) which anchored off Dun Laoghaire Harbour in 1996, again on that occasion, a lottery was held for the public during the visit of the 82,000 tonnes giant. Her call to Dublin Bay was during Jean Kennedy-Smith's tenure as US Ambassador to Ireland, and during the early days of the northern 'peace process'.

Returning to the present, the Irish Naval Service 'flagship' OPV L.É. Eithne (P31) arrived into the port today, albeit her call is of a typical short duration, where the 1,800 tonnes vessel will only make an overnight stay.

Notably she is the first and only Naval Service vessel to visit the US, when she visited Boston, Hamilton and New York in 1986. In addition the helicopter patrol vessel is the last naval vessel built in this state for the Naval Service and also is the last ever ship built in the the republic, when completed by Verolme Cork Dockyard in 1984.

It is ironic that the L.E. Eithne should visit the United States before making any call to Northern Ireland, which did not materilise until a historic first visit was made to Belfast Harbour in 2003. Her visit to the north was the first since partition in 1922 and the OPV docked in the port to where HMS Tyne was also berthed.

Published in Naval Visits

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

© Afloat 2020

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