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Dublin Bay Boating News and Information

Displaying items by tag: Waterfront Development

The Irish Times writes of a controversial development proposal for a scenic south Dublin fishing harbour has been given the go ahead by An Bord Pleanála.

Bartra Property, after a protracted planning struggle, has received permission to build a number of housing units at Bulloch Harbour in Dalkey.

It will consist of three three-storey houses, two apartments and a cafe as well as a number of other buildings.

Residents living at and near the picturesque coastal inlet, popular with tourists and for fishing, have long battled the proposals they believe are out of kilter with the surrounding area. Concerns have also been repeatedly aired as to the potential for flooding due to often high sea levels.

Local People Before Profit TD Richard Boyd Barrett said the decision was “incomprehensible”.

“Bulloch Harbour is a unique public amenity used by people of all ages. It is an important part of the heritage of south County Dublin, ” he said.

For more on this coastal development click here. 

Published in Dublin Bay

#Ports&Shipping - An invitation to members of the public and the business community has been made to attend the Port of Milford Haven’s Annual Consultative Meeting later this month.

The event is taking place at the Bridge Innovation Centre in Pembroke Dock on Friday 27th July, starting at 2.30pm. Attendees will receive updates from the Port’s Chairman Chris Martin, Chief Executive Alec Don and leaders of flagship projects Pembroke Dock Marine and the Milford Waterfront Development.

A number of milestones have been reached over the past twelve months including unanimous approval for a revision to Milford Waterfront’s outline planning consent, the launch of Discover Coast and Cleddau boat trips, a new collaboration with The National Museum of the Royal Navy and the acquisition of Havens Head Retail Park in Milford Haven.

Alec Don, Chief Executive at the Port, commented “We’ve had another busy year and made good progress in delivering our diversification strategy to reduce over-reliance on the volatile oil and gas industry. We’re looking forward to sharing our achievements with everyone as well as our vision for the future, whether that be existing customers of the Port or members of the community who have a genuine interest in what happens in and around the Waterway.”

Doors will open at 2pm for a 2.30pm start and light refreshments will be available. Anyone interested in attending and submitting questions prior to the event can email [email protected] or call 01646 696156.

Published in Ports & Shipping

Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore. 

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.