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Displaying items by tag: angling

#Angling - A new fund to support projects for sustainable and accessible angling in Ireland has been launched by Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI).

The Capital Works Fund of €500,000 is available for angling groups and clubs who are looking to improve access and infrastructure for angling.

The fund is aimed specifically at capital improvement works, with grants available to all groups and individuals including local development associations, tidy towns, angling clubs and others looking to improve access to angling.

The types of projects eligible for funding must provide for public access and include the following:

  • Clearing and fencing along rivers/ lakes to allow access for angling.
  • Disability-friendly angling stands.
  • Car parks to improve access for anglers (new car parks and upgrades to existing carparks).
  • Walkways to improve access for anglers.
  • Stands, styles, footbridges and boat slips.
  • Accessible angling boats.

Sean Kyne TD, Minister of State with responsibility for the inland fisheries sector, said: “Accessibility for people of all abilities is a priority if our inland fisheries are to be enjoyed by everyone.

“I welcome the investment which will open angling activity to a wider range of participants and I would encourage the community based groups to apply for funding.”

The funding scheme forms part of IFI’s National Strategy for Angling Development which aims to ensure that Ireland’s fish stocks and angling infrastructure are protected and enhanced for the economic value and recreational benefit which they offer to communities across Ireland.

The fisheries resource is worth €836 million to the Irish economy annually and supports upwards of 11,000 jobs, often in rural and peripheral communities.

IFI head of business development Suzanne Campion added: “We are now inviting applications for funding for ‘shovel-ready’ projects which will improve access to angling.

“This is a vital step in developing facilities for the 273,600 anglers currently in Ireland and the 163,000 international visitors who fished here in 2015. By improving access, we can help grow domestic participation in angling and encourage more visitors to our country every year.”

Campion said the National Strategy for Angling Development “aims to grow the annual economic contribution of angling by €96 million over the next five years, creating an additional 1,800 jobs and attracting 40,000 more tourists annually.

“We are calling on angling development groups to apply for funding through this scheme. Together, we can ensure our angling infrastructure is developed and we can help remove any barriers to participating in this valuable activity.”

Applications for funding should be submitted via the online application form.

Applications will be evaluated in light of the objectives of IFI’s National Strategy for Angling Development, which aims to make angling accessible and attractive through information, infrastructure and support, to develop tourism through the promotion of angling and to establish recognition of angling as an important leisure and recreational pursuit. The closing date for applications is Tuesday 8 November.

IFI said it expects to continue funding in this area in 2017, and invites expressions of interest (open till the end of November 2016) from those wishing to develop more complex projects to deliver on the National Strategy for Angling Development.

Published in Angling

#Angling - Galway anglers are mounting a protest against proposals to ban fishing in public spaces around the city, as the Connacht Tribune reports.

Both the Galway Bay Sea Angling Club and Galway City Salmon Angling Association have written separately to Galway City Council expressing their opposition to a draft bye-law that would prohibit angling “in any part of a park or open space” without prior written permission.

This would include areas popular with anglers such as Ballyloughane, Silverstrand and Blackrock, as well as the ‘high bank’ between the Salmon Weir and O’Brien’s Bridge in the city centre.

Anglers argue that any such ban on fishing in Galway would be costly to the economy that hinges on the sport, from tourism to the city’s tackle shops.

The Connacht Tribune has more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling
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#RNLI - Youghal RNLI’s volunteer lifeboat crew were tasked yesterday morning (Saturday 15 October) in choppy waters to reports of a man taken ill on board a chartered angling vessel.

At 11.30am the lifeboat launched to the location around a mile and a half off Capel Island, where the casualty had been unconscious for a period and was pale in appearance.

The lifeboat crew proceeded to administer casualty care when they recovered the casualty on board.

An ambulance was also requested and was awaiting the lifeboat on its return to station, where the paramedics checked the casualty over before giving him the all clear.

Commenting on the callout, Youghal RNLI lifeboat Helm John Griffin said: “[The charter vessel operators] did the right thing in contacting us when the man became unwell.

“It’s always better to get an ill person medically checked out if there are any concerns.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#FishKill - The fish kill on the Annsborough River in Co Down last weekend was caused by a chemical leak from a cracked pipe, accoridng to BBC News.

And NI Water has offered to restock the salmon and sea trout stream, one popular with local angling enthusiasts, days after the incident at its water treatment plant in the area.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, some 1,600 fish were killed when the river was polluted by what’s since been confirmed as a polyelectrolyte used in processing water treatment byproducts.

"The severity of this incident is very unusual for our company. We truly regret the outcome and the number of fish that have been killed,” said NI Water in a statement.

BBC News has more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling

#SomethingFishy - Pupils at Scoil Chroí Naofa in Bunninadden, Sligo have been named the national winners of Inland Fisheries Ireland’s Something Fishy competition for 2016 at an event in Sligo’s Clarion Hotel yesterday (Wednesday 12 October).

The winning group of 24 children from the school’s senior class take home the National Something Fishy Award and €700 for their animated short on the life cycle of the salmon – selected by an independent judging panel comprising fisheries officers and education staff.

Along with their teacher Adrian Ormsby, the class edited and produced the digital and artistic photo story during the previous school term.



The ‘Something Fishy’ programme is an educational initiative of Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) in partnership with Blackrock Education Centre, which allows students to learn about fish and the environment in a local context.

The 2016 programme saw 3,776 children taking part in 118 schools and 11 education centres nationwide. Students were invited to submit project entries into the competition with this year’s entries addressing the theme ‘Focus on Learning’.

“The standard of entry to this year’s Something Fishy competition was particularly high and it is fantastic to have so many children engaged on our fisheries resource,” said IFI chief executive Dr Ciaran Byrne.

“Something Fishy gives children an opportunity to learn valuable lessons about the importance of protecting and conserving the aquatic environment but perhaps more importantly, they are also empowered to share their learnings with their peers via digital projects which can be enjoyed by all.”

Bernie Burke, principal of Scoil Chroí Naofa, described the win as “a fantastic achievement by the students involved who have thoroughly enjoyed taking part in the programme.

“They have discovered the magical world within our waterways and enjoyed learning all about the aquatic environment. I would like to congratulate each of them and their teacher Mr Ormsby on all their hard work.”

Since the inception of Something Fishy in 2005, some 50,000 children have participated in the initiative which aims to promote interest and understanding in fish and their habitats.

As part of the educational programme, IFI fisheries officers visit schools and provide classroom-based assistance, with a full range of resources for teachers and children also available on the Something Fishy website.

Together, they explore the themes of fish, habitats, angling, water environment and the protection and conservation of Ireland’s rivers and lakes.

Aside from school-based learning, fisheries officers take students into the field to give them some practical experience of their work.

Published in Marine Wildlife

#FishKill - Accidental discharge from a water treatment works is to blame for a major fish kill incident on a Co Down river at the weekend, as the Belfast Telegraph reports.

Angling enthusiasts have expressed dismay over the deaths of more than 1,600 fish on a tributary of the Annsborough River that flows into Dundrum Bay near Newcastle, after making the grim discovery on Saturday 8 October.

The Northern Ireland Environment Agency is currently investigating the incident, which NI Water has admitted was caused by an accidental discharge of chemicals into a river known locally for salmon and sea trout.

The Belfast Telegraph has more on the story HERE.

Earlier today Afloat.ie reported on concerns among Northern Irish anglers over spikes in pollution and poaching on the country’s waterways.

Published in Angling
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#Angling - Pollution and poaching are a growing concern for anglers in the Carlingford and Lough Foyle areas, as Derek Evans reports in his latest Angling Notes for The Irish Times.

New figures from the Loughs Agency reveal a significant raise in pollution, the worst incident of which occurred this past August when hundreds of salmon fry were lost in a fish kill on the River Faughan, according to the Derry Journal.

In addition, the Loughs Agency report informed NI Environment Minister Michelle McIlveen of almost double the number of fishing gear seizures this year compared to 2015, as well as a sharp rise in court actions.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling

#Angling - Judge Marie Keane has convicted Belfast man John Beales of illegal fishing and obstruction of fisheries officers over an incident on the Clare River in Claregalway on 13 July 2015.

Beales was convicted for failure to attach a gill tag to a wild salmon under Section 3 of the Wild Salmon and Sea Trout Tagging Scheme Regulations and for obstruction under Section 301(7) of the Fisheries (Consolidation) Act, 1959.

Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) officers Conor Dennedy and Paul Reynolds attended court and gave evidence of events to Judge Keane at a sitting of Galway District Court on the 30th of September.

Officer Dennedy told how they were on a foot patrol on the Clare River on the date in question he saw an angler, later identified as Beales, fishing downstream of the bridge. When Beales noticed the fisheries officer, he concealed his fishing equipment and walked towards him.

Beales denied he had been fishing when questioned by Officer Dennedy. However, upon inspection of Beales’ van, Officer Dennedy found two salmon, one trout and two mounted fishing rods. One of the salmon had a tag for the Foyle Fisheries Area issued to Beales affixed to it, which is only valid in the Foyle area.

Beales became aggressive when questioned by fisheries officers and was later directed to leave the area by gardaí under the Public Order Act.

Initially, IFI issued Beales with a fixed charge penalty notice for the offence, but despite reminders, he did not pay. As a result, Beales was prosecuted and brought to court.

Judge Keane accepted the evidence of the fisheries officers in court and imposed fines totalling €900, as well as costs of €500. She also made a Forfeiture Order in respect of all items seized on the day from Beales.

Published in Angling

#Angling - Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) is looking for public feedback via an online survey on its current funding programmes, having awarded over €3.4 million to angling projects and fisheries initiatives in communities nationwide over the past five years.

Current funding channels include the Salmon Conservation Fund and the Midlands Fisheries Fund, which see IFI redistribute income gained from permits and licenses, as well as IFI’s Sponsorship Programme.

IFI is now looking to consult with previous recipients of funding alongside interested parties and potential applicants, on whether the funding programmes are meeting requirements and if there are any changes which could be made to improve them.

Sean Kyne TD, Minister of State with responsibility for the Inland fisheries sector, encouraged stakeholders to take part in the online survey.

“The programmes ensure that stakeholders are facilitated and partnered to assist in the strategic development of fisheries and angling developments,” he said, adding that “the angling sector is worth €836 million to Ireland’s economy annually, supporting upwards of 11,000 jobs.”

This month IFI will invite applications for funding for angling access improvement works. These projects should contribute to the delivery of an accessible and sustainable world class inland fisheries and sea angling resource and will form part of the National Strategy for Angling Development.

While this fund will be limited to ‘shovel ready’ projects on the river bank, further funding opportunities for more complex capital projects are likely early in 2017.

The funding survey should take less than five minutes to complete with all participants entered into a draw to win one of three €50 tackle shop vouchers. The survey is open to angling clubs, commercial fishermen, fishery promoters, community and local development groups as well as private individuals.

To find out more information about IFI’s funding programmes and to take the short funding survey, visit www.fisheriesireland.ie/fundingsurvey.

The survey will be live on the IFI website until Tuesday 8 November.

Published in Angling
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#Angling - Whitechurch Youth Group from Rathfarnham in Dublin has once again taken up angling as part of Inland Fisheries Ireland’s Dublin Angling Initiative (DAI).

The youth group recently embarked on lessons in the basics of fly fishing, one of the most popular forms of angling.

Students picked up the basics of fly fishing equipment, fly tying and fly casting very quickly. And after a couple of lessons on dry land in Whitechurch, they were ready to go to the river bank and put their skills into practice at a popular angling spot in Milltown.

That’s where Matthew McDonald caught a wild brown trout assisted by his friend Nicky O’Hagan on their first fishing trip with the DAI.

Whitechurch Youth Group previously ran a fly-tying programme for fly fishing during the Winter months for several years. After a two year break from fly-tying, they have decided to re-introduce it to the youth group’s programme over the next few months.

IFI’s initiative offers young people from national and secondary schools, summer projects and youth services the opportunity to attend fishing courses throughout the summer.

Among them are young people from the Sphere 17 youth group in Darndale, North Dublin, who took part in a nighttime fishing event in Maynooth recently.

To date, thousands of young people have been introduced to sea, coarse and game angling and the initiative has been a catalyst in setting up fishing clubs for young people throughout the country.

“We have partnered with Whitechurch Youth Group for many years in showing young people what fishing is all about,” said DAI co-ordinator Oisin Cahill. “Fly Fishing is a particularly enjoyable type of fishing and it was great to see how quickly the youth group members picked up the art of fly tying and casting.

“Fishing is a hobby which can be enjoyed at any age. It is fantastic to see so many young people take up angling through the Dublin Angling Initiative.

“We would encourage anyone interested to try it out and discover a pastime which will have a positive impact on your health and wellbeing as well as being good fun.”

For further information on the DAI, visit www.fisheriesireland.ie or contact Oisin Cahill at [email protected]

Published in Angling
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Dublin Bay

Dublin Bay on the east coast of Ireland stretches over seven kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine.

The biggest boating centre is at Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the Bay's south shore that is home to over 1,500 pleasure craft, four waterfront yacht clubs and Ireland's largest marina.

The bay is rather shallow with many sandbanks and rocky outcrops, and was notorious in the past for shipwrecks, especially when the wind was from the east. Until modern times, many ships and their passengers were lost along the treacherous coastline from Howth to Dun Laoghaire, less than a kilometre from shore.

The Bay is a C-shaped inlet of the Irish Sea and is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and 7 km in length to its apex at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south. North Bull Island is situated in the northwest part of the bay, where one of two major inshore sandbanks lie, and features a 5 km long sandy beach, Dollymount Strand, fronting an internationally recognised wildfowl reserve. Many of the rivers of Dublin reach the Irish Sea at Dublin Bay: the River Liffey, with the River Dodder flow received less than 1 km inland, River Tolka, and various smaller rivers and streams.

Dublin Bay FAQs

There are approximately ten beaches and bathing spots around Dublin Bay: Dollymount Strand; Forty Foot Bathing Place; Half Moon bathing spot; Merrion Strand; Bull Wall; Sandycove Beach; Sandymount Strand; Seapoint; Shelley Banks; Sutton, Burrow Beach

There are slipways on the north side of Dublin Bay at Clontarf, Sutton and on the southside at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, and in Dalkey at Coliemore and Bulloch Harbours.

Dublin Bay is administered by a number of Government Departments, three local authorities and several statutory agencies. Dublin Port Company is in charge of navigation on the Bay.

Dublin Bay is approximately 70 sq kilometres or 7,000 hectares. The Bay is about 10 kilometres wide along its north-south base, and seven km in length east-west to its peak at the centre of the city of Dublin; stretching from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour on the southside of the Bay has an East and West Pier, each one kilometre long; this is one of the largest human-made harbours in the world. There also piers or walls at the entrance to the River Liffey at Dublin city known as the Great North and South Walls. Other harbours on the Bay include Bulloch Harbour and Coliemore Harbours both at Dalkey.

There are two marinas on Dublin Bay. Ireland's largest marina with over 800 berths is on the southern shore at Dun Laoghaire Harbour. The other is at Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club on the River Liffey close to Dublin City.

Car and passenger Ferries operate from Dublin Port to the UK, Isle of Man and France. A passenger ferry operates from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Howth as well as providing tourist voyages around the bay.

Dublin Bay has two Islands. Bull Island at Clontarf and Dalkey Island on the southern shore of the Bay.

The River Liffey flows through Dublin city and into the Bay. Its tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle and the River Camac.

Dollymount, Burrow and Seapoint beaches

Approximately 1,500 boats from small dinghies to motorboats to ocean-going yachts. The vast majority, over 1,000, are moored at Dun Laoghaire Harbour which is Ireland's boating capital.

In 1981, UNESCO recognised the importance of Dublin Bay by designating North Bull Island as a Biosphere because of its rare and internationally important habitats and species of wildlife. To support sustainable development, UNESCO’s concept of a Biosphere has evolved to include not just areas of ecological value but also the areas around them and the communities that live and work within these areas. There have since been additional international and national designations, covering much of Dublin Bay, to ensure the protection of its water quality and biodiversity. To fulfil these broader management aims for the ecosystem, the Biosphere was expanded in 2015. The Biosphere now covers Dublin Bay, reflecting its significant environmental, economic, cultural and tourism importance, and extends to over 300km² to include the bay, the shore and nearby residential areas.

On the Southside at Dun Laoghaire, there is the National Yacht Club, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Royal Irish Yacht Club and Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club as well as Dublin Bay Sailing Club. In the city centre, there is Poolbeg Yacht and Boat Club. On the Northside of Dublin, there is Clontarf Yacht and Boat Club and Sutton Dinghy Club. While not on Dublin Bay, Howth Yacht Club is the major north Dublin Sailing centre.

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