Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

In association with ISA Logo Irish Sailing

Displaying items by tag: Department of Transport

#tender – The Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport wishes to advise Shipowners, Ship Operators, Shipmasters, Harbour Masters and Ships' agents of the requirements for passenger ships engaged in the tendering of passengers between the ship and shore.

All tender vessels must comply with the relevant provisions of the Merchant Shipping Acts. There are two main types of tendering as follows:

(a) Passenger Ships using ship's own tender vessels;
(b) Shore based domestic tender.

Considering each as follows:

(a) Ship's Own Tender Vessels – International Cruise Ships
It may be necessary for a ship to use its own tenders in cases where suitable berthing facilities are not available, or where the ship's draft or size prevents it from entering a port. This is permissible under the Merchant Shipping Act 2010 which sets out the requirements to be followed.

Proposals must be in compliance with the provisions of the Merchant Shipping Act 2010 and the IMO Guidelines for Passenger Ship Tenders as contained in IMO circular MSC.1/Circ.1417.

• There must be adequate manning on the bridge to ensure that the tendering operation is continuously monitored.
• Tendering operations are not to be carried out in restricted visibility.
• The ship and its tenders must maintain a continuous listening watch on VHF Channel 16 and the port working channel at all times during the operation.
• The ship must have the approval of the port(s) in which any operations are to take place.

(b) Using Shore Based Tender Vessels – Domestic Passenger Ships/Boats
All such tender vessels must comply with the Merchant Shipping Acts and hold a current valid passenger ship safety certificate or passenger boat licence.

Domestic Passenger ships/boats are to be moored to a single point mooring for the duration of the transfer. Such moorings are to be licensed by Coastal Zone Management (Foreshore Unit, Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government), and must not be located such as to cause obstruction to other vessels. Owners must ensure that such moorings are inspected on an annual basis.

Domestic Tendering operations will normally only be permitted for the summer period comprising of June, July and August and is subject to annual review.

Application Procedure
The owner or master of a ship who proposes to undertake a tendering operation at any place in the State, in respect of that ship, must apply to the Marine Survey Office for a permit to undertake such operation by submitting for approval a "Tendering Operations Safety Plan Proposal" in the format laid out in the Annex to this notice. An application for a permit to tender should be submitted 28 days before the date of the proposed tendering, to allow sufficient time for the proposal to be assessed.

The Marine Survey Office may withdraw a permit to carry out tendering operations where there is a failure to comply with the conditions of the permit.

This Marine Notice supersedes Marine Notice No. 12 of 2013.

Irish Maritime Administration,
Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport,
Leeson Lane, Dublin 2, Ireland.

18/02/2014

Encl.: Annex

Annex to Marine Notice No. 19 of 2014

MARINE SURVEY OFFICE
TENDERING OPERATIONS – SAFETY PLAN PROPOSAL

Operators:

Address:

Proposed tendering location:

Period of tendering proposed:

Description of proposed operation:

Insurance company details:

Nominated company official responsible for tendering operation:

Tendering Craft Details:
Type/names of vessels:

Number of tenders:

Is the tender a SOLAS approved Lifeboat as per MSC.1/circ.1417:

Materials of construction:

Number of crew in tender:

Maximum number of passengers in tender:

Propulsions Means / KW:

Number of lifejackets/buoyancy aids available for passengers:

Luggage transported separate to passengers, yes or no:

Tender Safety Certificate attached (last service inspection for Rib/Zodiac type boats)

Passenger Ship Details:
Name of ship(s):

Offshore mooring facilities available (give GPS co-ordinates):

Expected distance from vessel to shore:

Maximum number of passengers:

Means of berthing tender alongside:

Access means to board passenger vessel (ladder, ramp etc):

Means of embarkation from ashore, e.g. Slipway, steps, pontoon etc

Wind conditions:
Maximum wind conditions for tendering operation as per risk assessment for operation

Wave / Swell Height:
Maximum operational swell height for operation

Alternatives due to suspension of tendering:
Alternative proposals for suspension of tendering operations, i.e. Stranded passengers

Disabled passengers:
Disabled / special needs passengers – tendering operation arrangements:

Lifejackets/PFDs
SOLAS lifeboat type tenders – Where lifejackets are not worn but stowed in tender, has a risk assessment been carried out or is an ISM procedure in place?

Emergency Assistance
What emergency assistance is available for a tender in difficulty?

IMO Guidelines (not applicable to certified domestic passenger ship/boats)
Please confirm that the tender vessel and operation comply with the requirements of IMO circular MSC.1/Circ.1417

Safety Announcements:
Safety announcement to passengers:
1. Prior to boarding tender from pier, yes or no:
2. Prior to disembarking tender, yes or no:
3. Prior to embarking tender from passenger vessel, yes or no:

Operational records:
Method of keeping tendering operation records:
To include details of: dates & times of tendering, no. of trips and passenger numbers carried by each tender, name of passenger vessel embarking/disembarking, prevailing weather & sea state conditions

Proposed tendering dates:
Dates Operational times
1.
1.
2.
2.
3.
3.
4.
4.
5.
5.
6.
6.
7.
7.

Additional actions proposed by operations:

When completed, this form should be returned to:
Marine Survey Office, Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport, Leeson Lane, Dublin 2.

Published in Marine Warning

#ROSSLARE - The Department of Transport has tendered for external consultants to carry out a strategic review of Rosslare Europort, the Co. Wexford harbour which is predominantly a ferryport is currently operated by Irish Rail, the Irish Times reports.

The advisers will be asked to review the port's current commercial and operational efficiency and advise on an appropriate ownership structure.

This could include local authority involvement or some form of privatisation. It is understood the Government would prefer to retain Rosslare in state ownership, given its importance to tourism and trade.

Published in Ports & Shipping
The Irish Examiner reports that the Doolin coastguard unit is set to get a new coastguard station.
One of the busiest search and rescue units in the State, the Doolin unit of the Irish Coast Guard currently has to drag its boat some 2km by tractor to Doolin pier.
Much to the delight of local campaigners, the Office of Public Works is now inviting tenders for a €1.9 million dedicated coastguard facility at the pier, following the granting of planning permission by Clare County Council as part of a development plan for the area.
However, the unit's officer in charge Mattie Shannon is cautious about a start date for construction, as the Department of Transport will not be able to provide funding for the project until next year at the earliest.
Fianna Fáil TD for Clare Timmy Dooley told the Examiner: "The least the current Government can do is honour the commitment of the previous government and ensure that the appropriate finances are in place for next year."
The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

The Irish Examiner reports that the Doolin coastguard unit is finally set to get a new coastguard station.

One of the busiest search and rescue units in the State, the Doolin unit of the Irish Coast Guard currently has to drag its boat some 2km by tractor to Doolin pier.

Much to the delight of local campaigners, the Office of Public Works is now inviting tenders for a €1.9 million dedicated coastguard facility at the pier, following the granting of planning permission by Clare County Council as part of a development plan for the area.

However, the unit's officer in charge Mattie Shannon is cautious about a start date for construction, as the Department of Transport will not be able to provide funding for the project until next year at the earliest.

Fianna Fáil TD for Clare Timmy Dooley told the Examiner: "The least the current Government can do is honour the commitment of the previous government and ensure that the appropriate finances are in place for next year."

The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastguard
A US entrant in this year's Rolex Fastnet Race capsizsed near Fastnet Rock off the Cork coast earliert this evening, The Irish Times reports.
Further to our previous report, The Irish Times notes that 22 people were on board the Rambler 100, which overturned in force-five winds at around 6.30pm this evening.
The Department of Transport confirmed that all crew have been accounted for, with 16 sitting in the hull of the boat and the remainer on life rafts.
RNLI Baltimore's lifeboat and the Irish Coast Guard are currently attending. Coastguard helicopters have also been dispacted, with naval vessel LE Clara giving assistance. The rescue effort has been hampered by misty conditions in the area this evening.
Rambler 100 recently set a new world record for the almost 3,000-nautical mile transatlantic crossing from Newport, Rhode Island to Lizard Point in Cornwall with a time of 6 days, 22 hours, 8 minutes and 2 seconds.
Elsewhere, there was disaster in IRC Z this afternoon for co-skippers Karl Kwok and Jim Swartz’s Farr 80 Beau Geste (HKG).
The yacht suffered a ‘structural problem’ while mid-away across the Celtic Sea en route to the Rock. She has since turned her bow back towards Land’s End.
Yesterday there was another high profile retirement when Johnny Vincent’s TP52 Pace (GBR) returned to her berth in the Hamble with mast problems.
In the Class 40s John Harris’ GryphonSolo2 (USA) has also pulled out, retiring to Dartmouth with sail damage.

A US entrant in this year's Rolex Fastnet Race capsizsed near Fastnet Rock off the Cork coast earlier this evening, The Irish Times reports.

Further to our previous report, The Irish Times notes that 22 people were on board the Rambler 100, which overturned in force-five winds at around 6.30pm this evening.

The Department of Transport confirmed that all crew have been accounted for, with 16 sitting in the hull of the boat and the remainer on life rafts. 

ramblertext

Rambler 100 rounds the Fastnet Rock. Photo: Daniel Forster/Rolex

RNLI Baltimore's lifeboat and the Irish Coast Guard are currently attending. Coastguard helicopters have also been dispatched, with naval vessel LE Clara giving assistance. The rescue effort has been hampered by misty conditions in the area this evening.

ramblercapsize

Baltimore lifeboat at the scene of the capsized Rambler 100. Photo: Carlo Borlenghi/Rolex

Rambler 100 recently set a new world record for the almost 3,000-nautical mile transatlantic crossing from Newport, Rhode Island to Lizard Point in Cornwall with a time of 6 days, 22 hours, 8 minutes and 2 seconds.

In other Fastnet action, there was disaster in IRC Z this afternoon for co-skippers Karl Kwok and Jim Swartz’s Farr 80 Beau Geste (HKG).

The yacht suffered a ‘structural problem’ while mid-away across the Celtic Sea en route to the Rock. She has since turned her bow back towards Land’s End. 

Yesterday there was another high profile retirement when Johnny Vincent’s TP52 Pace (GBR) returned to her berth in the Hamble with mast problems. 

In the Class 40s John Harris’ GryphonSolo2 (USA) has also pulled out, retiring to Dartmouth with sail damage.

Published in Fastnet
The Deparment of Transport's latest marine notice advises seafarers off the west coast to keep a lookout while a 3D seismic survey is conducted over the next three weeks.
The vessel M/V Ramform Vanguard that will carry out the work will be towing 10 streamers 6km long and will have a minimum turning radius of 3km.
Due to this restriction in manoeuvrability, all boats in the area are requested to give the vessel a wide berth.
The vessel's planned locations are listed on the PDF of Marine Notice No 24 of 2011, which is available to read or download HERE.

The Department of Transport's latest marine notice advises seafarers off the west coast to keep a lookout while a 3D seismic survey is conducted over the next three weeks.

The vessel M/V Ramform Vanguard that will carry out the work will be towing 10 streamers 6km long and will have a minimum turning radius of 3km. 

Due to this restriction in manoeuvrability, all boats in the area are requested to give the vessel a wide berth.

The vessel's planned locations are listed in the PDF of Marine Notice No 24 of 2011, which is available to read or download HERE.

Published in News Update
The Department of Transport's latest marine notice reminds all bodies and individuals who have dealings with the department that it has now been renamed as the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport.
As a result of this, all departmental e-mail addressed have been changed, and will now end with dttas.ie. E-mail spam filters may need to be updated to reflect the new change to continue sending or receiving e-mails from the department.
A PDF of Marine Notice No 20 of 2011 is available to read/download HERE.

The Department of Transport's latest marine notice reminds all bodies and individuals who have dealings with the department that it has now been renamed as the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport.

As a result of this, all departmental e-mail addressed have been changed, and will now end with dttas.ie. E-mail spam filters may need to be updated to reflect the new change to continue sending or receiving e-mails from the department.

A PDF of Marine Notice No 20 of 2011 is available to read/download HERE.

Published in News Update
The Department of Transport's latest marine notice advises on the start of offshore drilling operations by Shell Ireland at the Corrib gas field in Co Mayo.
Drilling is scheduled to begin on or around 13 April, to last for approximately four months. The notice gives details of all planned locations by latitude and longitude.
A safety zone is in place around the gas field development, and all vessels - especially fishing boats - are requested to give the drilling unit a wide berth of at least 500m and keep a strong lookout in the vicinity.
A PDF of Marine Notice No 19 of 2011 is available to read/download HERE.

The Department of Transport's latest marine notice advises on the start of offshore drilling operations by Shell Ireland at the Corrib gas field in Co Mayo.

Drilling is scheduled to begin on or around 13 April, to last for approximately four months. The notice gives details of all planned locations by latitude and longitude.

A safety zone is in place around the gas field development, and all vessels - especially fishing boats - are requested to give the drilling unit a wide berth of at least 500m and keep a strong lookout in the vicinity.

A PDF of Marine Notice No 19 of 2011 is available to read/download HERE.

Published in Water Safety
The Department of Transport's latest marine notice pertains to the requirements for passenger vessels in assisting with search and rescue services.
All passenger ships on international routes - including ferries and cruise liners - are obliged to have a plan for co-operation with search and rescue operations should their assistance be needed.
The notice outlines that any plan should be developed between the ship itself, the ship company and the Irish Coast Guard. Plans must also be drilled periodically to test their effectiveness.
Ship owners and masters are also obliged to give an indication of the existence of their co-operative rescue plans by way of SeaSafeIreland (SSI) notification. Should that not be possible, the Marine Survey Office of the Department of Transport must be notified directly.
A PDF of Marine Notice No 18 of 2011 is available to read and download HERE.

The Department of Transport's latest marine notice pertains to the requirements for passenger vessels in assisting with search and rescue services.

All passenger ships on international routes - such as ferries and cruise liners - are obliged to have a plan for co-operation with search and rescue operations should their assistance be needed. 

The notice outlines that any plan should be developed between the ship itself, the ship company and the Irish Coast Guard. Plans must also be drilled periodically to test their effectiveness.

Ship owners and masters are also obliged to give an indication of the existence of their co-operative rescue plans by way of SeaSafeIreland (SSI) notification. Should that not be possible, the Marine Survey Office of the Department of Transport must be notified directly.

A PDF of Marine Notice No 18 of 2011 is available to read and download HERE.

Published in Ferry
The Department of Transport's latest marine notice lays out the format for reporting inadequate harbour facilities for handling ship-generated waste.
Shipping companies depend on good standards at receiving ports and harbours in order to comply with the relevant EU directive. But the notice outlines that improvement of port facilities' waste handling is partly dependent on users reporting any inadequacies.
The notice includes the International Maritime Organization's standard format for reporting unsatisfactory port reception facilities.
For all ships, reports should be sent to the relevant port authority as well as the Ship-Source Pollution Prevention Section of the Department of Transport. Non-Irish flagged ships in Irish ports should also send any reports to the ship's flag state.
A PDF of Marine Notice No 17 of 2011 can be viewed/downloaded HERE.

The Department of Transport's latest marine notice lays out the format for reporting inadequate harbour facilities for handling ship-generated waste.

Shipping companies depend on good standards at receiving ports and harbours in order to comply with the relevant EU directive. But the notice outlines that improvement of port facilities' waste handling is partly dependent on users reporting any inadequacies.

The notice includes the International Maritime Organization's standard format for reporting unsatisfactory port reception facilities. 

For all ships, reports should be sent to the relevant port authority as well as the Ship-Source Pollution Prevention Section of the Department of Transport. Non-Irish flagged ships in Irish ports should also send any reports to the ship's flag state.

A PDF of Marine Notice No 17 of 2011 can be viewed/downloaded HERE.

Published in Ports & Shipping
The Department of Transport's latest marine notice adds two more classes of liferaft to those deemed acceptable for use on small fishing vessels that do not require SOLAS/MED approval.
The list of accepted four-person inflatable liferafts (all with SOLAS Pack) now includes the following: DSB; RFD Surviva; RFD Seasava; Viking DK; Zodiac; Eurovinyl ISO/DIS 9650; Sea-Safe ISO 9650-1 Group A Type 1; and Seago ISO 9650-1.
Vessels affected by this notice are those less than 40ft (12m) in length and carrying four or fewer persons.
A PDF of Marine Notice No 16 of 2011 can be viewed HERE.

The Department of Transport's latest marine notice adds two more classes of liferaft to those deemed acceptable for use on small fishing vessels that do not require SOLAS/MED approval.

The list of accepted four-person inflatable liferafts (all with SOLAS Pack) now includes the following: DSB; RFD Surviva; RFD Seasava; Viking DK; Zodiac; Eurovinyl ISO/DIS 9650; Sea-Safe ISO 9650-1 Group A Type 1; and Seago ISO 9650-1.

Vessels affected by this notice are those less than 40ft (12m) in length and carrying four or fewer persons.

A PDF of Marine Notice No 16 of 2011 can be viewed HERE.

Published in Water Safety
Page 1 of 2

About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Car Brands

subaru sidebutton

Featured Associations

ISA sidebutton dob
ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating