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Displaying items by tag: P&O Cruises

Operator P&O Cruises will not resume cruise sailings until at least April next year.

The company ended its cruises in March in response to the coronavirus pandemic and has not resumed any of its voyages since.

The Southampton-based firm, which is part of the Carnival group, said the continued pause in operations was because of "the current uncertainty around European ports of call".

The latest round of cancellations affects 19 planned cruises.

For much more click BBC News here to include a comment from P&O's CEO in addition the sight of idle cruiseships at anchor of the UK's south coast formed an 'unusual attraction' during the summer. 

Among these cruiseships as Afloat identified in the report's photo offshore of Weymouth is Arcadia (on left) an infrequent caller to Irish waters.

Published in Cruise Liners

Cruise jobs of around 450, reports LiverpoolEcho, are to be axed by Carnival UK which operates cruise lines Cunard and P&O Cruises amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The company said it wants to treat everyone "with fairness and respect" but said the changes were needed to "ensure the future sustainability" of the business.

The news comes after P&O Ferries said it would be forced to cull a quarter of its employees by making them redundant, as the pandemic continues to have a major impact on businesses.

PA reports a Carnival UK spokesman said: "We have begun a period of consultation with our staff in Southampton across all levels of the business.

More from the Merseyside newspaper here. 

Afloat.ie adds the Southampton based Carnival UK operation is not to be confused with P&O Ferries which is separately owned by DP World.

As for the P&O Cruises brand this was devested from P&O in 2000 and for a short timeframe became a subsidiary P&O Princess Cruises. By 2003 however the brand following a merger of the cruise company and Carnival Corporation, became part of the US cruise giant which has its headquarters located in Miami, Florida.

Published in Cruise Liners
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#Cruiseliners - A captain of a cruise ship found to be burning fuel with excessive sulphur levels has been fined €100,000 (£88,500) in a Marseille court, the first such ruling in France.

The prosecution writes The Guardian was intended to signal a new seriousness in tackling pollution from cruise ships after a spot-check in March on the Azura, operated by P&O Cruises, found it contained unauthorised bunker fuel.

The American captain, Evans Hoyt, knew the fuel was illegal – it contained 1.68% sulphur, 0.18% above the European limit – and the company was using it to save money, prosecutors said during the trial.

The judge handed Hoyt a fine of €100,000, but specified that the parent company of P&O, the US-based Carnival, should pay €80,000 of the sum. The company had “wanted to save money at the expense of everyone’s lungs”, the prosecutor Franck Lagier told the court in October.

A recent report in the journal Nature attributed 400,000 premature deaths and 14m cases of childhood asthma a year to emissions from dirty shipping fuel.

A spokesman for Carnival said: “The Carnival group carries over 12 million guests on its vessels each year and takes its legal and moral obligations towards the protection of the environment very seriously indeed. We were therefore very disappointed to be prosecuted for this offence, which was based on a European law the French environment ministry had explicitly informed the cruise industry would not be applied to cruise ships and which, in any event, has still not been properly implemented. The captain was using the fuel in good faith, as directed by us, based on our understanding of the law. We have lodged an appeal and will consider the full decision of the court once it is available.”

For more including the port of Marseaille click here

Afloat adds the 3,100 passenger capacity cruiseship has visited Irish ports among them Cork (Cobh) with a first call in 2010.

A sister of the 'Grand' class ship, Carribean Princess Afloat previously covered in 2016 was then given a record fine for dumping oil using a so called 'magic pipe' within UK waters three years previously. 

The cruiseship has visited Irish ports too notably in 2017 when making the most calls of any cruiseship to Dublin Port with a scheduled 13 calls alone to the capital.

Published in Cruise Liners

#KillybegsP&O - Killybegs first visitor from P&O Cruises, the 30,000 tonnes Adonia set sail last night as a lone piper played on the pier to mark her departure.

Adonia had arrived in the port yesterday morning with about 700 passengers on board.

The master of the cruiseship, Captain David Box, called in at the Killybegs Information Centre and presented a commemorative plaque to Manager, Anne Dorrian, and the team.

For more on the debut call of the prestigious cruise operator, see yesterday's DonegalNow.com

Another P&O caller and the largest ever cruiseship due to Killybegs as Afloat previously reported is the 69,000 tonnes Oriana on 26 June.

The 1,800 passenger ship is one of a record breaking season of eight cruise callers this year to visit the north-west port. 

Published in Cruise Liners

#Cruiseliners - Killybegs Information Centre has confirmation through Sinbad Marine Services that three visits to the port in 2015 have been scheduled by the prestigious brand P&O/Carnival Lines.

The cruiseships to visit Killybegs under the P&O Cruises flag will be the largest passenger ships so far to use the port. Among the brands of Carnival Group are famous lines such as Cunard, Princess Cruises and Holland America Line.

P&O's Adonia is due in port on June 17 and will return for a second visit on July 21. A second P&O Cruises fleet-member Oriana, which is twice the size, is due to berth on June 26.

The calls by P&O brings to a total of eight callers confirmed for 2015, and passenger figures visiting Killybegs next year is greater than last year's season, itself a record.

The 30,000 tonnes Adonia, with a length of 180.45 m (592 ft) is smaller by comparison to the 69,000 tonnes Oriana with a length of 260.00 m (853.02 ft).
Adonia has a capacity for more than 800 passengers while Oriana has a maximum capacity of more than 1,900 passengers with a crew of just under 800 (794).

Anne Dorrian of the Killybegs Information Centre said "This is great news and we hope it will lead to even bigger vessels visiting Killybegs in the future".

"The Adonia is a pathfinder ship, exploring ports which the larger ships of today had not previously considered. Hopefully, her visit will pave the way for some of the most splendid ships in the Carnival fleet to come to beautiful County Donegal."

She added "Between 2009 and 2014, there have been 52 visits by cruise ships to Killybegs with over 22,000 passengers and more than 6,000 crew. In 2015, the eight ships confirmed will bring an estimated 6,300 passengers to the town.

Carnival Cruise Lines is a British-American owned company, based in Florida and the brand is one of ten forming Carnival Corporation & plc.

The line has the largest fleet in the group, with 24 vessels accounting for more than 21% of the worldwide market share.

 

Published in Cruise Liners

#CruiseAnchorage - P&O Cruises Oriana anchored this morning off Dun Laoghaire Harbour and marks another visit of the famous company following fleetmate Arcadia which called earlier this month, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Oriana with a capacity for almost 2,000 passengers was completed in 1995 and the Bermuda-flagged 69,840 tonnes cruiseship had sailed overnight through the Irish Sea under the command of Captain D. Pembridge who has charge of the adults-only cruiseship.

The gloriously favourable weather conditions which saw passengers swimming during Arcadia's visit has somewhat diminished, however Oriana still offers a choice of three pools and four whirpool spas.

Guests can also avail of the many on board facilities and after taking an excursion ashore to Dun Laoghaire Harbour or trips to the capital and the neighbouring countryside, an appetite will invariably build-up. One option is The Marco Pierre White Ocean Grill restaurant situated in the sumptuous surroundings of the Curzon Room.

 

Published in Cruise Liners

#P&OCruises – Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company welcomed today the mid-sized cruiseship Arcadia (83,500 tonnes) under the command of Captain S C Breton, who is the first female to take this position for P&O Cruises, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Arcadia had departed her homeport of Southampton on Sunday and spent a leisurely passage before arrival this morning in glassy flat-calm seas and weather conditions more akin to the Mediterranean.

Passengers swam on board two of the ships outdoor swimming pools while the 285m long cruiseship was anchored motionless in the strong blue seas of Dublin Bay.

Enjoying the weather are more than 1,900 passengers from the UK and a sprinkling of other nationalities. Eighty per cent of her guests will be taking tenders ashore to visit Dun Laoghaire or excursions into the capital and the neighbouring Wicklow mountains.

The 2005 built exclusively adult-only cruiseship will be departing around teatime this evening on the 900 nautical mile passage to the Icelandic capital Reykjavik. After visiting two more ports in Iceland as part of the 14-night cruise Arcadia heads across the North Sea with calls to Norway before returning to the familar Southampton Waters.

In recognition of the Arcadia's maiden call, presentation ceremonies took place on board between Captain Breton and Don McManus, Dun Laoghaire Harbour Company (DLHC) board member and Chairman of Dun Laoghaire Business Association and Cathaoirleach Carrie Smyth of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council. Also in attendence was David Dingle, CEO of Carnival Corporation (UK).

The cruise liner sector is a growing business within the tourism industry and Dun Laoghaire Harbour is capitalising on such strengths and following the construction of the purpose-built cruise passenger tender pontoon.

The passenger pontoon facility caters for medium and large-scale cruiseships such as the Queen Mary 2 which made her historic first call in May which marked the start of the season with 14 cruise calls to the harbour in 2013.

Within the next two months, a further seven cruise vessels are scheduled to visit Dún Laoghaire Harbour including the five-masted Wind Surf, which is due to dock within the harbour walls.

arcadiapool

One of two swimming pools on the Arcadia and during her anchorage call in Dublin Bay. Photo Jehan Ashmore

arcadiacrew

Pictured (L-R) James Brown Deputy Captain, Don McManus (DLHC) and Chairperson Dun Laoghaire Business Association, Captain S C Breton, Cathaoirleach Carrie Smyth of DLRCoCo, David Dingle CEO Carnival Corporation (UK) and Nicky Logue, Fitzpatrick Castle Hotel. Photo: Jehan Ashmore

Published in Cruise Liners

#CRUISE LINERS – The final cruise caller this year to visit Dublin Port tomorrow is P&O Cruises Adonia, which today is at sea, having departed Cobh Cruise Terminal yesterday, as previously reported. Albeit the smallest in the seven-strong P&O Cruise fleet, she was given pride of place as she led the company's 175th anniversary Grand Event held during the summer, writes Jehan Ashmore.

On that momentous day (3rd July) in Southampton, the 30,000 gross registered tonnes Adonia gathered with her considerably larger fleet mates (69,000 – 115,000 grt) and carrying between them 1,800-3,100 passengers each. Unlike her fleet mates however she exclusively caters for adults only and at only 710 passengers, provides for a more intimate cruising experience.

As each cruise ship took it turns to depart after one after the other, they formed a line down Solent waters where the maritime spectacle was an impressive display in seafaring skills and logistics as thousands of passengers had embarked to include Arcadia whose next port of call was Dublin.

The historic day to mark the origins of the famous company formed in 1837 was the theme of a packed out lecture presented by P&O Cruises Managing Director, Carol Marlow during last months' London Ship Show. Marlow, who was a former CEO of Cunard Line, gave an insightful and entertaining talk of the intensive preparations surrounding P&O Cruises day of celebration.

Despite all the planning, one major event that the P&O team could not arrange was for the sun to shine!..instead a rather misty dull overcast day lingered over the Hampshire port. Having said, many hundreds lined the Solent to watch the sail past as each vessel departed on seven cruises. To view a video of the splendid liners and heritage of the famous company click the series of videos HERE.

As for the London Ship Show which was organised by the Ocean Liner Society, this was to be the last time held under its current format where maritime memorabilia stands and lecture programme where provided to all those interested in the world of liners and ferries operating from the UK.

Published in Cruise Liners

#SHANNON CRUISECALL – P&O Cruises Adonia is visiting the mid-west port of Foynes on the banks of the Shannon port today, writes Jehan Ashmore.

She had made a call to the east coast last week in Dublin Port and the 30,277 tonnes vessel is the second caller so far this year to visit the Shannon region, when the ultra-luxurious Silver Whisper docked in the Co. Limerick port in mid-May.

A further two cruise callers are scheduled, as Le Diamant is also due to call this week on Thursday. The final caller is Amadea, which is expected to close the season next month.

All cruise callers will dock in Foynes which is one of six port facilities along the Shannon Estuary which is under the control of the Shannon Foynes Port Company (SFPC).

Published in Cruise Liners

#CRUISE LINERS – In dense sea-fog conditions, three cruiseships arrived into Dublin Bay at dawn and proceeded to dock in Dublin Port, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Of the trio, Kristina Katarina (1982/12,668grt) today made her inaugural call to the port. As previously reported on Afloat.ie she is operated by Finnish owners Kristina Cruises based in Kotka, a city midway between Helsinki and sharing the border with the Russian Federation.

The other vessels, P&O Cruises Adonia (2001/30,277grt) and Silverseas Cruises Cloud (1994/16,927grt) are berthed within Alexandra Basin, nearby Kristina Katarina is moored on the river berth at Ocean Pier.

Reported last month another tree-some of cruiseships gathered in the port, which this year is scheduled to see around 90 such cruise callers during the season.

Published in Cruise Liners
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About Dublin Port 

Dublin Port Company is currently investing about €277 million on its Alexandra Basin Redevelopment (ABR), which is due to be complete by 2021. The redevelopment will improve the port's capacity for large ships by deepening and lengthening 3km of its 7km of berths. The ABR is part of a €1bn capital programme up to 2028, which will also include initial work on the Dublin Port’s MP2 Project - a major capital development project proposal for works within the existing port lands in the northeastern part of the port.

Dublin Port has also recently secured planning approval for the development of the next phase of its inland port near Dublin Airport. The latest stage of the inland port will include a site with the capacity to store more than 2,000 shipping containers and infrastructures such as an ESB substation, an office building and gantry crane.

Dublin Port Company recently submitted a planning application for a €320 million project that aims to provide significant additional capacity at the facility within the port in order to cope with increases in trade up to 2040. The scheme will see a new roll-on/roll-off jetty built to handle ferries of up to 240 metres in length, as well as the redevelopment of an oil berth into a deep-water container berth.

Dublin Port FAQ

Dublin was little more than a monastic settlement until the Norse invasion in the 8th and 9th centuries when they selected the Liffey Estuary as their point of entry to the country as it provided relatively easy access to the central plains of Ireland. Trading with England and Europe followed which required port facilities, so the development of Dublin Port is inextricably linked to the development of Dublin City, so it is fair to say the origins of the Port go back over one thousand years. As a result, the modern organisation Dublin Port has a long and remarkable history, dating back over 300 years from 1707.

The original Port of Dublin was situated upriver, a few miles from its current location near the modern Civic Offices at Wood Quay and close to Christchurch Cathedral. The Port remained close to that area until the new Custom House opened in the 1790s. In medieval times Dublin shipped cattle hides to Britain and the continent, and the returning ships carried wine, pottery and other goods.

510 acres. The modern Dublin Port is located either side of the River Liffey, out to its mouth. On the north side of the river, the central part (205 hectares or 510 acres) of the Port lies at the end of East Wall and North Wall, from Alexandra Quay.

Dublin Port Company is a State-owned commercial company responsible for operating and developing Dublin Port.

Dublin Port Company is a self-financing, and profitable private limited company wholly-owned by the State, whose business is to manage Dublin Port, Ireland's premier Port. Established as a corporate entity in 1997, Dublin Port Company is responsible for the management, control, operation and development of the Port.

Captain William Bligh (of Mutiny of the Bounty fame) was a visitor to Dublin in 1800, and his visit to the capital had a lasting effect on the Port. Bligh's study of the currents in Dublin Bay provided the basis for the construction of the North Wall. This undertaking led to the growth of Bull Island to its present size.

Yes. Dublin Port is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland. It handles almost 50% of all trade in the Republic of Ireland.

All cargo handling activities being carried out by private sector companies operating in intensely competitive markets within the Port. Dublin Port Company provides world-class facilities, services, accommodation and lands in the harbour for ships, goods and passengers.

Eamonn O'Reilly is the Dublin Port Chief Executive.

Capt. Michael McKenna is the Dublin Port Harbour Master

In 2019, 1,949,229 people came through the Port.

In 2019, there were 158 cruise liner visits.

In 2019, 9.4 million gross tonnes of exports were handled by Dublin Port.

In 2019, there were 7,898 ship arrivals.

In 2019, there was a gross tonnage of 38.1 million.

In 2019, there were 559,506 tourist vehicles.

There were 98,897 lorries in 2019

Boats can navigate the River Liffey into Dublin by using the navigational guidelines. Find the guidelines on this page here.

VHF channel 12. Commercial vessels using Dublin Port or Dun Laoghaire Port typically have a qualified pilot or certified master with proven local knowledge on board. They "listen out" on VHF channel 12 when in Dublin Port's jurisdiction.

A Dublin Bay webcam showing the south of the Bay at Dun Laoghaire and a distant view of Dublin Port Shipping is here
Dublin Port is creating a distributed museum on its lands in Dublin City.
 A Liffey Tolka Project cycle and pedestrian way is the key to link the elements of this distributed museum together.  The distributed museum starts at the Diving Bell and, over the course of 6.3km, will give Dubliners a real sense of the City, the Port and the Bay.  For visitors, it will be a unique eye-opening stroll and vista through and alongside one of Europe’s busiest ports:  Diving Bell along Sir John Rogerson’s Quay over the Samuel Beckett Bridge, past the Scherzer Bridge and down the North Wall Quay campshire to Berth 18 - 1.2 km.   Liffey Tolka Project - Tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the River Liffey and the Tolka Estuary - 1.4 km with a 300-metre spur along Alexandra Road to The Pumphouse (to be completed by Q1 2021) and another 200 metres to The Flour Mill.   Tolka Estuary Greenway - Construction of Phase 1 (1.9 km) starts in December 2020 and will be completed by Spring 2022.  Phase 2 (1.3 km) will be delivered within the following five years.  The Pumphouse is a heritage zone being created as part of the Alexandra Basin Redevelopment Project.  The first phase of 1.6 acres will be completed in early 2021 and will include historical port equipment and buildings and a large open space for exhibitions and performances.  It will be expanded in a subsequent phase to incorporate the Victorian Graving Dock No. 1 which will be excavated and revealed. 
 The largest component of the distributed museum will be The Flour Mill.  This involves the redevelopment of the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road based on a masterplan completed by Grafton Architects to provide a mix of port operational uses, a National Maritime Archive, two 300 seat performance venues, working and studio spaces for artists and exhibition spaces.   The Flour Mill will be developed in stages over the remaining twenty years of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Source: Dublin Port Company ©Afloat 2020. 

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