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Displaying items by tag: port of Cork

After a transatlantic voyage of 12 days originating from the Canadian port of Halifax, the French cable-laying ship Ile d'Aix is berthed in Cork Harbour.

The 150-metre ship can load 3,500 tons of cable and carry 90 people. 

The ship is connected with renewable energy projects and has previously carried out projects in the Celtic Sea. 

Operated by Louis Dreyfus Armateurs, Ile d'Aix is enroute to the French port of Calais.

Published in Port of Cork
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The massive North Sea Giant ship that berthed at Marino Point in the Port of Cork at the weekend is among the largest and most advanced subsea construction vessels ever built.

The Norwegian flagged offshore supply ship docked over the weekend and at 153 metres long and a sight to behold. 

Today, the North Sea Giant is heading north up the Irish Sea to perform demanding roles in a wide variety of marine operations in deep and ultradeep waters.

Its carrying capacity is 12705 t DWT and her current draught is reported to be 7.2 metres. Her length overall (LOA) is 153.6 meters and her width is 30.6 metres.

Published in Cork Harbour
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Check out this timelapse video (below) as two super-structures are moved effortlessly onto the quayside at Cork Container Terminal.

In 2020 the Port of Cork took ownership of two Ship to Shore (STS) Gantry Cranes for the new state-of-the-art Port facility, Cork Container Terminal in Ringaskiddy in Cork Harbour. The cranes were built by Liebherr Container Cranes Ltd in Killarney, County Kerry and were assembled onsite under the supervision of expert Liebherr engineers.

A Ship to Shore Gantry Crane is the single most important piece of equipment in any container port, used to lift containers from ship to land and vice a versa.

These new STS cranes are fitted with the latest energy-saving Liebherr Liduro drives, power management systems and safety features available in today’s STS crane markets. The cranes will have an outreach of 45m, a back reach of 15m and a lift height over rail of 32m. With a safe working load of 54 tonnes in weight (40 tonnes under spreader) these cranes will ensure the Port has the lift and reach capacity to cater for the largest container vessels which will visit Cork Container Terminal in the coming decades.

Once operational, Cork Container Terminal will deliver the fastest, most reliable, and cost-efficient container service available to local businesses as well as Ireland’s international exporters.

Liebherr Container Cranes Ltd. is part of the Liebherr group and supplies container handling equipment to ports and rail terminals worldwide.

Published in Port of Cork
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The Port of Cork Company (PoCC) has reported that its financial performance for 2020, albeit lower than that of 2019, was ahead of the expectations set earlier in the year against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Ports of Cork Company including Bantry Bay Port Company reported a total consolidated traffic throughput of 10.5 million tonnes in 2020 compared to 10.1 million in 2019.

These strong traffic volumes were due in part to the commencement of two new shipping services from Ringaskiddy, Cork in 2020, and an 81% increase to 1.3 million metric tonnes (2019: 0.73 million metric tonnes) at Bantry Bay Port Oil storage at the Zenith Energy Whiddy Island Storage facility, while Bantry Bay Port Oil Storage increased throughput at Whitegate Oil Refinery decreased slightly.

While traditional LOLO container volumes trended lower, the overall volumes of containers handled by the Port increased by 4% to a record 250,209 TEU (2019: 240,186 TEU’s). This growth which trended toward new shipping modes in response to Brexit and the commencement of a direct Con-Ro service from Ringaskiddy to the Belgian Port of Zeebrugge. The Port also reported that Dry bulk cargo, primarily Agri Products (animal feed, cereals & fertilizers), increased by 2.5% to 1.42 million tonnes (2019: 1.39 million tonnes) which was welcomed.

The overall volumes of containers handled by the Port of Cork increased by 4% Photo: Bob BatemanThe overall volumes of containers handled by the Port of Cork increased by 4% Photo: Bob Bateman

Port of Cork Company consolidated turnover for the year 2020 amounted to €33.7 million (2019: €37.7m), a decrease of 10.47% or €4m., the profit after taxation for the financial year amounted to €4.7m (2019: €6m).

Conor Mowlds, Chief Commercial Officer of the Port of CorkConor Mowlds, Chief Commercial Officer of the Port of Cork

Conor Mowlds, Chief Commercial Officer, Port of Cork said: “In this year of Brexit, the Port’s trade in 2020 reduced during the Covid 19 pandemic, with the areas most impacted being Cruise traffic and the reduced passenger ferry sailings. However, Container traffic, bulk trade, Whitegate Oil Refinery and Whiddy Oil Storage facility all continued to trade successfully in 2020, which was ahead of our expectations. From the beginning of the Covid 19 pandemic, the Port was designated an essential service and thanks to the work of our entire team we were able to keep imports and exports moving, without any delays in our operations”.

He continued: “The Covid 19 pandemic ensured that 2020 was a challenging year for the company, both financially and from an operational perspective. The Port of Cork Company turnover for 2020 was €33.7 million (2019: €37.7m), a decrease of €4m. The impact on the tourist industry worldwide was particularly stark, and in our case, it resulted in the loss of 98 Cruise Liner calls, a primary factor in our reduced turnover. In addition, Brittany Ferries Ro-Pax services were severely impacted due to Covid 19 passenger travel restrictions”.

While the immediate future remains challenging as Ireland slowly emerges from the pandemic, new routes established last year such as CLdN weekly Con-Ro Service direct to Zeebrugge and the unique ICL weekly direct transatlantic service to the US (East Coast), add to the Port’s capacity to carry export goods estimated to value in the region of €20 billion, and imports to the value of €10 billion, underpinning the importance of the Port’s contribution to the national recovery.

The Port of Cork Company is looking forward to the awaited completion of its newly developed Cork Container Terminal in Ringaskiddy, the continued growth of its presence in the Con-Ro space with the introduction of Grimaldi service to Belgium, and remain optimistic about the return of cruise to Cork sometime in 2022.

Published in Port of Cork
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On Thursday 15th July, Cobh and Harbour Chamber and the Port of Cork will jointly host an online cruise tourism workshop. The workshop is aimed at local tourist attractions and providers and is a great opportunity to hear about the global cruise industry as destinations and Ports emerge from the pandemic, and the planned return of cruises to Cork in 2022.

The workshop will host several key speakers including Conor Mowlds, Chief Commercial Officer Port of Cork, Niamh McCarthy MD of Excursions Ireland, Captain Michael McCarthy Chair of Cruise Europe, Jackie Coakley Cobh Tourism and Seamus Heaney Pure Cork/Visit Cork.

A Cruiser liner passes Crosshaven while exiting Cork HarbourA Cruiser liner passes Crosshaven while exiting Cork Harbour Photo: Bob Bateman

This workshop is a must for anyone in the tourism business that wants to get a synopsis of the cruise industry and how it will operate once it returns in 2022. It is also an opportunity for local businesses to explore ways of developing new shore excursions that can be sold to potential cruise passengers coming to Cobh and Cork.

President of Cobh & Harbour Chamber, Johanna Murphy said: ‘This cruise tourism workshop is such an exciting opportunity for local businesses and tourism attractions to hear first-hand from industry experts on the how we can all play our part in the resumption of cruise. Since the pandemic, Cobh has not had any visiting cruise ships and we are very eager to encourage their return as their economic contribution is valuable to the town of Cobh.’

The 75,000 tonne Norwegian Spirit is a Leo-class cruise ship operated by Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL)The 75,000 tonne Norwegian Spirit is a Leo-class cruise ship operated by Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL) Photo: Bob Bateman

While cruise bookings are strong for 2022, the Port of Cork is cautiously optimistic that a resumption can happen once all necessary return protocols are in place.

Conor Mowlds, Chief Commercial Officer said: ‘Cruise tourism took a massive hit during the pandemic both locally and globally. We are nonetheless optimistic that cruise will return to Cork in 2022. We must now focus on developing a return to cruise protocol that will satisfy the Dept of Transport, Port Health, Cruise Lines, Shore Excursion providers local business and communities. This really is a combined effort from all parties to ensure the safe return and this cruise workshop is the first step in working together.’

The Royal Princess alongside in Cobh in Cork Harbour Photo: Bob BatemanThe Royal Princess alongside in Cobh in Cork Harbour Photo: Bob Bateman

Cruise Liners in Cork Harbour Photo Gallery by Bob Bateman

Published in Cruise Liners

The Port of Cork and Independent Container Line (ICL) jointly celebrated the shipping services first year in operation, in what can be described as a record first year. The direct deep-sea route which operates between Cork and US (East Coast) is the only direct route out of Ireland connecting to the USA.

ICL reported that trade exporting from Ireland has increased five-fold in its first year, and imports have doubled. General commodities handled on this service include refrigerated cargo (Pharma, Foodstuffs), Beverages, Healthcare Products, Building Materials, Chemicals, Auto Parts, Paper and Packaging Products.

A fast weekly service, 10 days to Chester PA, 13 days to Wilmington NC, gives exporters unprecedented opportunities to develop business in the USA. A carrier focused on customized logistics solutions, ICL also set up a weekly “guaranteed” Less than Container Load (LCL) service, in both directions, with Container Freight Stations (CFS’s) in Dublin and Cork.

Independent Container Line (ICL) cargo ship Independent SpiritIndependent Container Line (ICL) cargo ship Independent Spirit

Paul Sanders, ICL General Manager UK & Ireland said: ‘We’ve been very pleased with how our first year, calling directly into Cork, has developed. It has been especially pleasing given this has been done during a pandemic, which meant we could not visit or hold face to face meetings, ahead of starting the service. It’s a testament to the great partnership we’ve developed with the Port of Cork, that we have been able to make this happen.’

Connecting Ireland and the USA with a direct service made complete sense to ICL, and as a specialist North Atlantic carrier, ICL were perfectly suited to do this.

Mr Sanders continued: ‘The last 12 months has demonstrated not only our commitment, but our industry-recognised schedule reliability, and we only see further growth. ICL’s export volumes from Ireland have grown 500% during our 1st year, with import volumes also hugely increased, and we are continuing to see expansion as the year progresses.’

Conor Mowlds, Port of Cork’s Chief Commercial Officer congratulated ICL on their first year in operation saying: ‘The Port of Cork are delighted with the success of this direct route to the US which greatly enhances our Port connectivity. With Cork Container Terminal in Ringaskiddy on the horizon, we have the potential to further support ICL and grow cargo volumes from and to Ireland. This is a fantastic strategic development for the Port of Cork as we look to develop Ringaskiddy as a modern logistics hub.’

Conor Mowlds, Port of Cork’s Chief Commercial OfficerConor Mowlds, Port of Cork’s Chief Commercial Officer

Speaking at the anniversary of the direct ICL shipping route from the Port of Cork to the USA, Paula Cogan, President of Cork Chamber commented: ‘The direct shipping route from the Port of Cork to the USA with ICL has been an excellent strategic enhancement to connectivity for our city region and country. The Port’s ongoing investment in the €80 million Cork Container Terminal in Ringaskiddy is proving visionary and best in class infrastructure builds confidence and attracts investment. It is important now that Government supports the demand for connectivity with border and customs inspection infrastructure at the Port of Cork to allow this growth trajectory to continue.’

Seamus Fives, Site Leader, Pfizer Pharmaceuticals (Cork) and Chair of AmCham’s Southern Region said: ‘As the voice of over 800 US companies in Ireland, representing key exporting sectors such as Pharmaceuticals, ICT and Medical Technologies, the American Chamber of Commerce Ireland congratulates Independent Container Line(s) and the Port of Cork on the first anniversary of their direct shipping services to the East Coast of the US.’

He continued: ‘The value and importance of Ireland in Global Supply Chains have been reinforced throughout the pandemic. Ireland ranks 5th in the world for global exports of Covid-19 related goods. The Cork Port route to the US has offered greater accessibility for the movement of goods and services, which further strengthens our position as a global location of choice for inward investment.’

ICL have a long-established relationship with agent, Johnson Stevens (with offices in Dublin and Belfast) who handle all ICL’s operations.

Martina Creamer, Joint MD of Johnson Stevens said: ‘We are hugely proud to be managing this ground-breaking Trans-Atlantic service for ICL and have been delighted with the support from the Irish shipping community. We look forward to the new Cork Container Terminal opening soon, and further developing this great service.’

Published in Port of Cork
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The Port of Cork is inviting vessels across Cork Harbour to sound their horns at midday on Friday, June 25th, to mark the international ‘Day of the Seafarer’.

The initiative aims to salute the approximately 1.6 million seafarers globally and raise awareness of the role of seafarers which often goes under appreciated within the maritime industry and by the public.

Seafarers are an essential component in world trade, keeping the economy moving and delivering the goods and fuels we use every day, into and out of our Ports.

As well as the sounding of the ship’s horns, the Port of Cork will reach out to each vessel in Cork harbour and offer a gift of appreciation to the captain and all his/her crew onboard.

Port of Cork Harbour Master, Captain Paul O’Regan, says; “On the ‘Day of the Seafarer’, the Port of Cork wishes to acknowledge the role of all seafarers in our Ports and Harbours, who go above and beyond in the delivery of services at sea and on land. Shipping has been vital to the stability in the supply chain during the recent pandemic and this small effort is to salute all those who are spending time away from their families and to acknowledge their incredible work.’

People living around Cork Harbour have been invited to participate by filming the effort and posting the videos to social media using #DayoftheSeafarer and #Keepingtheshowontheroad.

According to International Maritime Organisation (IMO) ships transport almost 90 percent of the world’s goods trade. Seafarers are not only responsible for the operations of such ships but are also responsible for the safe and smooth delivery of the cargo.

International Seafarers Day is an annual celebration organised by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) to recognise the contribution that seafarers make to our everyday lives.

Published in Port of Cork
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The Port of Cork is delighted to welcome a new container service from Southampton to Cork Harbour operated by Unifeeder. This new Lift on Lift off (LoLo) service will offer importers and exporters a reliable route to market with fixed weekday schedules from Cork.

Commenting on the new LoLo service, Conor Mowlds, Chief Commercial Officer, Port of Cork said: ‘We are delighted to see a new LoLo customer entering the Irish market. Unifeeder is a dynamic logistics company with one of the largest and best-connected feeder and shortsea networks in Europe.’

He continued: ‘This service is a very positive development for both exporters and importers, and we are delighted Unifeeder have chosen the Port of Cork as their southern gateway to the Irish market.’

Martin Gaard Christiansen, CCO, Global Feeder, Unifeeder said: ‘We are pleased that Unifeeder has launched a new service via the Hubport of Southampton to/from the Ports of Cork and Belfast. The new service to the Irish Sea is further expanding Unifeeder’s presence in Northern Europe and will allow us to offer our customers an even more extensive outport coverage. First sailings are already successfully completed and going forward, will run as a weekly fixed-weekday service and expect to include Dublin on the route soon.’

Published in Port of Cork
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Following recent large public gatherings at the City Quays, the Port of Cork has decided in the interest of public safety and to be able to accommodate the Port’s commercial shipping traffic in a safe and efficient manner, the Port will fence off sections of the city quays.

The Port of Cork will fence off the following areas:

  • Around any berthed commercial vessels.
  • Around plant or Port equipment generally stored on the quayside.
  • Around cargo stored on the quays.

Fencing will be erected this week, ahead of the June Bank Holiday Weekend and remain in place until further notice.

The Port of Cork say they would like to remind the public that the city quays are a 24/7 working Port area with commercial ships, plant and other equipment and HGV traffic in operation. The Port of Cork utilises the City Quays predominately for dry or break bulk cargo.

The Port of Cork operates 24/7 and commercial traffic can be scheduled or unscheduled. Irrespective, when a ship arrives into Cork, it is imperative the berth/quays are free and available to operate and facilitate that vessel.

No parking is permitted on the quayside and clamping is in operation.

There are health and safety risks associated with large public gatherings on the quays and the public are advised not to congregate in this area.

Published in Port of Cork
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The Port of Cork has issued a Cork Harbour Marine Notice to cover arrangements for this morning's Irish South and West Fish Producers Organisation Planned ‘Show and Tell’ at the Port of Cork

In a statement, the Port says "The Port of Cork have had proactive conversations with the Irish South and West Fish Producers Organisation regarding their planned ‘Show and Tell’. The Port of Cork has agreed to facilitate the fishing vessels at Cork City Quays". 

The ‘Show and Tell’ which is planned for Wednesday 26th May 2021 will not impact on the Port of Cork’s commercial traffic or Port operations, the Port says. The fishing vessels are expected to depart from the City Quays at approximately 3 pm.

Download the notice to mariners below

Published in Port of Cork
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Page 1 of 28

Ferry & Car Ferry News The ferry industry on the Irish Sea, is just like any other sector of the shipping industry, in that it is made up of a myriad of ship operators, owners, managers, charterers all contributing to providing a network of routes carried out by a variety of ships designed for different albeit similar purposes.

All this ferry activity involves conventional ferry tonnage, 'ro-pax', where the vessel's primary design is to carry more freight capacity rather than passengers. This is in some cases though, is in complete variance to the fast ferry craft where they carry many more passengers and charging a premium.

In reporting the ferry scene, we examine the constantly changing trends of this sector, as rival ferry operators are competing in an intensive environment, battling out for market share following the fallout of the economic crisis. All this has consequences some immediately felt, while at times, the effects can be drawn out over time, leading to the expense of others, through reduced competition or takeover or even face complete removal from the marketplace, as witnessed in recent years.

Arising from these challenging times, there are of course winners and losers, as exemplified in the trend to run high-speed ferry craft only during the peak-season summer months and on shorter distance routes. In addition, where fastcraft had once dominated the ferry scene, during the heady days from the mid-90's onwards, they have been replaced by recent newcomers in the form of the 'fast ferry' and with increased levels of luxury, yet seeming to form as a cost-effective alternative.

Irish Sea Ferry Routes

Irrespective of the type of vessel deployed on Irish Sea routes (between 2-9 hours), it is the ferry companies that keep the wheels of industry moving as freight vehicles literally (roll-on and roll-off) ships coupled with motoring tourists and the humble 'foot' passenger transported 363 days a year.

As such the exclusive freight-only operators provide important trading routes between Ireland and the UK, where the freight haulage customer is 'king' to generating year-round revenue to the ferry operator. However, custom built tonnage entering service in recent years has exceeded the level of capacity of the Irish Sea in certain quarters of the freight market.

A prime example of the necessity for trade in which we consumers often expect daily, though arguably question how it reached our shores, is the delivery of just in time perishable products to fill our supermarket shelves.

A visual manifestation of this is the arrival every morning and evening into our main ports, where a combination of ferries, ro-pax vessels and fast-craft all descend at the same time. In essence this a marine version to our road-based rush hour traffic going in and out along the commuter belts.

Across the Celtic Sea, the ferry scene coverage is also about those overnight direct ferry routes from Ireland connecting the north-western French ports in Brittany and Normandy.

Due to the seasonality of these routes to Europe, the ferry scene may be in the majority running between February to November, however by no means does this lessen operator competition.

Noting there have been plans over the years to run a direct Irish –Iberian ferry service, which would open up existing and develop new freight markets. Should a direct service open, it would bring new opportunities also for holidaymakers, where Spain is the most visited country in the EU visited by Irish holidaymakers ... heading for the sun!

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